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FEATURES
By DAN RODRICKS and DAN RODRICKS,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1999
Sometimes mourners forget it's coming. They're distracted, of course, not really thinking about the fine points of ceremony. The 24 haunting notes are familiar: They've heard them countless times at funerals for soldiers and police officers, during Memorial Day services, in the nationally televised burials of presidents, and in the movies. Yet nothing really prepares them for the moment.A man or a woman in uniform and white gloves raises a horn, then sounds the nation's official farewell to the honored dead.
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NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1998
He was born in the back seat of a car in West Baltimore, on his way to the only hospital in town that would deliver blackinfants.For Louis H. Hopson Jr., life's lessons in discipline and courage began early. The son of an Army master sergeant -- a man of uncommon valor, with medals on his chest and shrapnel in his head to prove it -- Hopson also inherited no small measure of tenacity."My husband insisted on doing things one way, the right way," said Ruth Hopson, 70. "And once he decided what was right, you could not change his mind.
NEWS
December 17, 1998
Thomas Paul Banz Sr., a Baltimore native and retired salesman, died Friday of complications of a brain tumor at a Cleveland hospice. He was 52 and lived in Westlake, Ohio.Mr. Banz worked for over 30 years in sales and marketing and retired last year for health reasons.The Gardenville native was a 1964 graduate of Mount St. Joseph High School and attended Loyola College. He enlisted in the Army in 1968 and served with the infantry in Vietnam. He was discharged in 1972 with the rank of lieutenant and his decorations included the Bronze Star and two Purple Hearts.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1998
Calm fell. From heaven distilled a clemency;There was peace on earth, and silence in the sky;Some could, some could not, shake off misery:The Sinister Spirit sneered: 'It had to be!'And again the Spirit of Pity whispered, 'Why?'-- Thomas HardyBy the time the guns fell silent along the Western Front at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, more than 9 million soldiers, sailors and airmen had been killed.Another 5 million noncombatants perished in World War I. Included in these casualty figures are 1,721 Marylanders who fell in battle or later died of wounds.
NEWS
By Geoffrey C. Upton and Geoffrey C. Upton,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 1, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Officer Jacob J. Chestnut, an 18-year veteran of the Capitol Police, was buried yesterday afternoon at Arlington National Cemetery, one week after he and another officer were slain at the Capitol.Chestnut, who served in Vietnam during a 20-year Air Force career, was given full military honors as he was laid to rest under a cherry tree, with his family and hundreds of police officers from around the nation looking on. For the second straight day, thousands of mourners took to the streets and highways in and around the District of Columbia to pay their respects to a slain Capitol police officer.
NEWS
By Kirsten Scharnberg and Kirsten Scharnberg,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1998
The caption for maps in yesterday's editions pinpointing the locations of Annapolis and Loudon Park national cemeteries incorrectly stated that they are the only two in Maryland of the 14 original national cemeteries established in 1862. There is a third -- Antietam National Cemetery in Sharpsburg.The Sun regrets the errorsBeyond the wrought-iron gate, headstones are decaying with age, epitaphs scarcely legible. Simple words, carved in stone, are poignant: "Here lies a soldier." Endless rows of white grave markers form perfect columns on the rolling hills.
FEATURES
By KEN FUSON and KEN FUSON,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1998
Two soldiers.Both loved their country.Both loved to fly.And 26 years ago today, in one of the last major battles of theVietnam War, both crashed and died on the same afternoon within three miles of each other. Their inscribed names nearly touch on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.Army Capt. Rodney Strobridge was 30.Air Force 1st Lt. Michael Blassie was 24.Their bodies were never recovered. Grieving family members held memorial services, but there was nothing to bury.Until now.Pentagon officials believe six bones -- four ribs, part of a pelvis and upper right arm -- buried in the Vietnam section of the Tomb the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery belong either to Strobridge or Blassie.
NEWS
November 26, 1997
SHAME. SHAME. SHAME! That's what Republicans in Congress and their co-conspirators on talk radio angrily shouted at the Clinton administration last week. Why, the dastardly cads in the White House had been selling hard-to-come-by burial plots at Arlington National Cemetery -- a military shrine -- to campaign donors!Shame, indeed. But not on President Clinton or Army Secretary Togo D. West, who had done nothing wrong. The shame belongs to those very Republicans who had wrapped themselves in ersatz patriotism to whip up veterans groups against the White House.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Caitlin Francke contributed to this article | March 28, 1997
The father of Marine Cpl. Andre D. Boone -- who will be buried with honors Monday afternoon at Arlington National Cemetery -- believes that Howard County police might have been able to prevent his son's slaying.Boone, 23, was shot to death last Friday at the Columbia home of his stepfather, James Milton Harding Jr., an hour after another man called police to complain that he had been threatened by Harding.That man, Sean Mease, told police that Harding had a gun in his house. Harding, a former Maryland state trooper and a former Howard County police recruit, has been charged in Boone's slaying.
FEATURES
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | September 15, 1995
Arlington, Va. -- The mournful notes of taps and the crackle of rifle volleys were on the wind. The flag, folded into a crisp triangle, was passed to the family. Salutes were exchanged and the military honors ended.Then the Arlington Lady stepped forward. Murmuring to Regina Shinners, widow of Cmdr. John E. Shinners Sr. of Towson, she delivered a personal note and condolence cards from the chief of naval operations and the commandant of the Washington Naval District.Part comforter, part record-keeper, part referee, the Arlington Lady keeps alive a military tradition begun nearly 50 years ago -- ensuring that no one is buried alone at Arlington National Cemetery, which sees about 100 funerals each week.
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