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SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,Sun Staff Writer | April 7, 1995
The Liberty girls lacrosse team has cranked out another scoring phenom.The newest version of instant offense for the Lions is senior midfielder Amie Rose, who has ripped apart four Howard County teams for 18 goals and four assists in four easy wins.Rose is off to such a torrid start that she might surpass Nathalie Skovron's county record of 76 goals in 18 games for Liberty, set in 1994.Skovron averaged 4.2 goals, and Rose is scoring 4.5 goals a game, putting her on pace to score 81 if Liberty makes it all the way to the state finals (18 games)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By SUN STAFF | October 2, 2003
On Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., the National Mall will be overrun by avid readers and more than 80 award-winning authors, illustrators and storytellers. The free National Book Festival is sponsored by the Library of Congress. First lady Laura Bush is the host. It features pavilions for many interests: Home and Family, Poetry, Teens and Children, Fiction and Imagination, Mysteries and Thrillers, History and Biography, Storytelling, Let's Read America and Pavilion of the States. Festival-goers can buy books or bring their own for authors to sign.
FEATURES
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 17, 1990
Washington You're at a swanky dinner party anywhere in the country -- go ahead, pick a state -- and the person to your right or your left claims to be a Close Personal Friend of the Bushes."
NEWS
April 11, 2004
HCC professor to sing in Nightingale service at National Cathedral Dee Jones, a Harford Community College visiting nursing professor, has been selected to sing in the Florence Nightingale Service at the Washington National Cathedral at 4 p.m. May 9. She will perform the title song from her debut CD, "Light Your World" to commemorate Florence Nightingale's contribution to nursing. Jones is a resident of Havre de Grace. She received a bachelor's degree in nursing from the University of Maryland, Baltimore.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 12, 2002
WASHINGTON - The nation's capital spent much of yesterday looking over its shoulder and scanning the skies overhead. In a city that escaped last Sept. 11 without the devastation that was perhaps intended for it, anxiety and caution abounded. Even as Washington carried on business as usual, any sudden move or unexpected sound jangled a multitude of nerves. James O'Neill flinched when the whine of a low-flying aircraft bounced off the walls of the Lincoln Memorial. "What's that?" asked O'Neill, a businessman from Appleton, Wis. "It's eerie," he said.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2004
Nancy Reagan was reported to have planned yesterday's national funeral service for her husband years in advance, down to the final details. It played out just about perfectly on television - as prettily as a movie - as Ronald Reagan was honored as a transformative president, the FDR of the second half of the 20th century. David Gergen, a former communications director in the Reagan White House, noted that Reagan brought ceremonial trappings of office back to the presidency after the informality of Jimmy Carter.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,Sun Staff Writer | April 30, 1995
Debbi Bourke makes lacrosse look so simple.She races past opponents down the field, catches the ball in full stride and instinctively whips a pass to a wide-open teammate or goes straight to the goal for a high-percentage shot.At times, it looks as if she could completely dominate any game.But the Liberty senior attacker doesn't believe in one-person shows."I don't like girls who take the ball through three people to score," said Bourke. "I prefer to pass."That is exactly what the 5-foot-2 Bourke has been doing a lot during her three years on the Liberty varsity team that is 39-3 with Bourke around.
FEATURES
March 10, 1996
The Washington National Cathedral will conduct Lenten and Easter services through Easter Day, April 7.To accommodate as many worshipers as the cathedral can safely hold, free advance passes for the 8 a.m. and the 11 a.m. Easter Day services will be available by mail order. To request passes, send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Easter 1996, Washington National Cathedral, Massachusetts and Wisconsin Aves. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20016--5098. Include your name, address and daytime phone number; specify the service you prefer and the number of passes needed no more than six per service.
NEWS
Scott Calvert and Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2011
A frightening earthquake jolted Baltimore and much of the East Coast on Tuesday, shaking buildings and rattling nerves. Thousands of people streamed from offices and homes into the afternoon sunshine, stunned by a phenomenon more commonly associated with seismic hot spots like California and Japan. Area officials reported that the quake caused only pockets of significant damage, and there were no known deaths or serious injuries, locally or nationwide. But the sense of alarm was widespread as mystified residents jammed phone networks trying to reach loved ones and officials scrambled to assess the fallout.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | May 27, 2004
Granite pillars stand for the 56 states and territories of the United States at midcentury. Arches represent the Atlantic and Pacific theaters of World War II. Gold stars mark the 400,000 American lives lost. These are a few of the elements that make the National World War II Memorial a sweeping exercise in architectural symbolism, a place where every piece of the composition is imbued with meaning. But the most powerful symbolism is rooted in the way the memorial has been placed on the National Mall in Washington, occupying a 7.4-acre tract halfway between the Lincoln Memorial and the Washington Monument.
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