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By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2005
Last week, the new owner of New York City's Plaza Hotel announced plans to convert the historic building into condominiums, retail space and a much smaller hotel. Inevitably, the news alarmed devotees of Eloise, the children's literary heroine who happens to have lived at the Plaza for five decades. How will she handle condo life? Not well, we suspect. We wouldn't be surprised if one day soon we saw a missive very much like this (with apologies to Kay Thompson): Iam Eloise I am fifty-six I am an urban lady I live in a condo Ooooooooooooooo I absolutely loathe the condo I had a temper fit when Bill the busboy left and when Johanna the day maid took early retirement I scuffed and slomped and made a really terrible racket Now I have simply nothing to do You can't just skidder around anymore If there is a door open you must knock on it anyway and you can't say charge it please if the neighbor gives you a cookie and you must not pour a pitcher of water in the mail slot or the neighbor will call the police Oh my Lord it's boring I'm getting addicted to C-SPAN Nanny says The Plaza's gone to pot pot pot My mother e-mailed from Paris and rawther agreed The new kitchen has put Nanny out of her head She sklonks with the pots and pans and there is smoke and a smell Enough is enough is enough she says Eloise we're ordering out Here's what I like Planked Medallion of Beef Tenderloin with Fresh Vegetables Maison Here's what I get Lo mein I miss Rene with Room...
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FEATURES
By BEVERLY MILLS | July 24, 1994
Child Life is a forum for parents to ask child-rearing questions and share tips with other parents. Call our answering machine with any advice or questions you have. Please check the end of the column for the toll-free number and today's question from a parent who needs your help.Q: I'm going back to work and will be interviewing sitters for my 6-month-old. I'm sure I've thought of the obvious things, but I'd like to hear about the not-so-obvious considerations. What do parents know now that they wish they'd known then?
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | April 2, 1996
NEW YORK -- Energy at last. After seven days of countless runway shows devoted to '70s retro, a new decade breaks the sameness. The '20s roared down Anna Sui's runway in the shape of supermodels Linda, Nadja, Naomi and Shalom, who have kept themselves scarce during the week of fall fashion collections here.New York's hip, downtown diva saw that the bin of thrift-shop chic ideas has been picked clean and she stepped up to an older vintage style.English eccentrics were her inspiration, and she mixed plaids, tweeds, laces and velvets with the abandon of a nanny on speed.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | January 10, 1992
"The Hand that Rocks the Cradle'' won't put you to sleep, but that isn't because the theme is a new one.The new film uses the old plot about a loony who invites herself into a household and threatens the lives of its members.Things go about the way you expect them to, but Curtis Hanson, who directed, manages to make it work.In this instance, the loony is the widow of a doctor who had been sued for sexual harassment. The doctor, his reputation ruined, commits suicide; his widow wants revenge, and her target is the woman who brought the suit.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Staff writer | January 16, 1991
One hundred years is a long time for a woman to wait for the right man to come along, but in "The Sleeping Beauty of Loreland," it turns out to be a worthwhile wait.The North Carroll High School Drama Club will present children's author Frances Homer's modern remake of Charles Perrault's classic "Sleeping Beauty" Friday and Saturday in the school auditorium."It's basically the same story as "Sleeping Beauty," with a few minor differences," explained drama teacher Roberta Rooney, the play'sdirector.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | February 23, 1993
A WASHINGTON lawyer friend of mine named Michael Spekter called me in the middle of the night and said excitedly, "What do you think of this? I've been reading up on the new attorney general appointee, Janet Reno, who maintains that she doesn't have a 'nanny' problem because she has no children."Listen to this. She's got guts, she has integrity and doesn't take any stuff from anybody. Furthermore, she was a great state's attorney, she's single, and she has a mind of her own."There's more.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | January 12, 1994
If you're interested in movies of mice and men -- or, to state it another way, if you're interested in movies "Of Mice and Men" -- the Showtime cable network has the evening's most intriguing offering. It's presenting back-to-back prime-time presentations of two film versions, made more than 50 years apart, of the classic John Steinbeck story.* "The Nanny" (8-8:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- If you've watched Cloris Leachman in any of Mel Brooks' productions, from "Young Frankenstein" to her Teutonic Ms. Frick on TV's short-lived "The Nutt House," you know what kind of nanny she can play -- and, on tonight's episode of "The Nanny," she does.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | September 17, 1997
A trio of season-ending repeats from last season can only mean one thing: premiere month is hard upon us, and new episodes can't be far beyond.Unfortunately, that's not true of NBC's "Wings" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11), which repeats May's season- and series-ending finale, as the gang goes on a wild hunt for riches after finding an old suitcase containing a cryptic note from the late father of Joe (Tim Daly) and Brian (Steven Weber).But both CBS' "The Nanny" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | January 24, 1993
In the 1 1/2 years she's been a single working mother, Christin Spain has been through three nannies. In her search, there have been women she couldn't afford to hire -- but not for the reason you might think.One woman who applied for the job wanted to be paid "under the table" because she lived in a subsidized housing complex and didn't want her rent to go up. But Ms. Spain, the manager of a Radio Shack store in York, Pa., needed to do everything by the book -- pay employment and Social Security taxes -- so that she could claim the year-end tax credit for child care that helps her make ends meet.
NEWS
October 24, 2002
An interview with Laura Wieder, a co-founder of the Sunday Readers book club. Are you the discussion leader for your club? We don't really have a discussion leader. ... It's sort of like a dinner thing. We have appetizers and, you know, a bottle of wine, and then we have dinner later and discuss the book. So we sort of don't have anything formal. What book are members reading this month? We're reading Prodigal Summer by Barbara Kingsolver. We read The Poisonwood Bible that she wrote. It was sort of a mixed group: Some people really liked it and some people didn't like it. They thought it was sort of depressing.
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