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Nancy Smith

NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Dana Hedgpeth contributed to this article | July 2, 1998
Though the chances of winning may be slim, a private foundation has filed a lawsuit to halt the sale of the 300-acre Smith farm, the last swath of rural land in Columbia.The suit, filed Monday in Howard Circuit Court, states that Elizabeth C. "Nancy" Smith, an eccentric who died in 1997, wanted to "preserve her land" forever and had no intention to sell the property to private developers or Howard County.County officials, who have been negotiating with Smith's heirs to buy the farm, have expressed interest in creating an athletic complex there.
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BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,Staff Writer | May 1, 1992
Primarily because of a strong performance by its mortgage company, Ryland Group Inc. reported yesterday that earnings for the first quarter rose to $2.6 million, in contrast to a loss of $4.4 million in the same period last year.But an analyst who tracks Ryland, the Columbia-based homebuilding and mortgage finance company, cautioned that the company can expect only slow improvement in the housing market.Michael Mead, an analyst at Legg Mason Wood Walker in Baltimore, contends that the aging of the baby-boom generation will keep a partial brake on housing demand, since there will be relatively fewer young people seeking first homes.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1997
The Columbia Association's governing board has formed j jTC small task force aimed at turning the coveted Smith farm in east Columbia into a large regional park.Made up of Wanda Hurt of Owen Brown village, Cecilia Januszkiewicz of Long Reach village and Alex Hekimian of Oakland Mills village, the task force will try to figure out how to turn the undeveloped tract into a park.The farm of Elizabeth C. "Nancy" Smith -- almost 300 acres in the middle of Columbia along Route 175 -- is worth almost $8 million, according to a recent appraisal.
NEWS
December 2, 2001
Ohio developers alarm residents of Oella The proposed plan to turn the historic and already vital Oella Mill in the quaint village of Oella across the river from old-town Ellicott City into 177 "luxury apartments" has engendered alarm and outrage among residents, rather than the mild "concerns" mentioned in your article ("Plan for Oella Mill raises concerns," Nov. 19). Your article also failed to mention a standing-room-only crowd at a special meeting of the Greater Oella Community Association on Nov. 14, where the developers presented their rose-colored calculations that 177 apartments renting for $1,400 to $3,000 would generate a maximum of 240 cars.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1998
Relatives of Elizabeth C. "Nancy" Smith are suing a Baltimore bank, alleging that someone forged almost $20,000 worth of checks drawn on her account.Baltimore attorney Frederick Steinmann filed the suit this week in Howard County Circuit Court on behalf of Smith's two heirs -- Jane P. Nes and Ruth B. McClees, both of Baltimore -- against First National Bank of Maryland.Smith died last February without a will, leaving the fate of her 300 acres in the middle of Columbia up in the air. The land is worth an estimated $8 million.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | April 23, 1995
Blandair seems a forgotten place.Vines curl around the old mansion's red bricks and its black-shuttered windows. Its once-proud white portico sags to one side on rotted timbers above a vine-choked front door.The home of 81-year-old recluse Elizabeth C. "Nancy" Smith -- on 300 acres of undeveloped land near the heart of Columbia -- is the subject of intense disagreement between county officials and preservationists about how best to protect the parcel from development.Suspicious of government and conservation groups alike, Miss Smith, who still lives at Blandair, adamantly refuses to make any public arrangements with either of them to preserve the land when she dies.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1998
Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker said yesterday the county is close to a deal to buy the 300-acre Smith farm, but it may cost more than the initial $8 million estimate."
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1998
For all practical purposes, Howard County has $8 million in hand to buy the 300-acre Smith Farm in Columbia. The problem is that no one knows how much the land is worth, or even if it is for sale.Yesterday, Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced the commitment of $4 million in state money to purchase the farm along Route 175. The state's money will come from program open space funds. The money will be matched by $4 million that County Executive Charles I. Ecker has said the county will pay for buying the land and turning it into a park.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1997
Eighty-two-year-old recluse Elizabeth C. "Nancy" Smith was buried last week without a will -- leaving the future of Columbia's largest tract of undeveloped land up for grabs.The bulk of Smith's multimillion-dollar estate is 300 acres of much-sought farmland straddling Route 175 adjacent to several east Columbia neighborhoods. The county planning chief, Joe Rutter, calls the land -- worth at least $15 million -- "the jewel in the middle of Columbia.""It's a hole in the middle of Columbia," Rutter said.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1997
In an article in Tuesday's Howard County edition of The Sun, Rupert Friday, a planner in the Maryland Office of Planning, was incorrectly quoted. In reference to the future of Elizabeth C. "Nancy" Smith's property in Columbia, he said: "I'm sure there are sharp land-use attorneys who are already knocking on the heirs' doors after the place."The Sun regrets the error.State and local officials launched a belated effort yesterday to protect from development 300 acres of farmland in the middle of east Columbia along Route 175.About a dozen state legislators, environmentalists, preservationists and officials from Howard County gathered in Annapolis for the first meeting of a hastily formed task force charged with finding options on how to keep commercial interests from getting the land.
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