Advertisement
HomeCollectionsNails
IN THE NEWS

Nails

SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY and DAN CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | October 27, 2005
HOUSTON -- The Chicago White Sox captured their first World Series title since 1917 last night, defeating the Houston Astros, 1-0, to complete a four-game sweep. Astros closer Brad Lidge allowed a two-out, run-scoring single to White Sox outfielder Jermaine Dye in the eighth inning for the game's only run. The White Sox swept the series, but it was not exactly in dominating fashion, as they earned three one-run victories after a two-run win in Game 1. Regardless, they joined the 1999 New York Yankees as the only teams to go through the postseason with one loss since the playoffs expanded in 1995.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By BRITTANY BAUHAUS | October 27, 2005
Trent Reznor and his Nine Inch Nails have clawed their way into the angst-ridden hearts of millions since the 1989 release of their first album, Down In It. Currently with a hefty 20 compilations under their belt, NIN will perform at MCI Center in Washington on Wednesday night. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., and the show starts at 7, with opening performances from Queens of the Stone Age and Death from Above 1979. MCI Center is at 601 F St. N.W. Tickets are $45 through ticketmaster.com or 410-547-SEAT.
SPORTS
By BRENT JONES and BRENT JONES,SUN REPORTER | October 5, 2005
The artificial turf at M&T Bank Stadium has been unkind to a number of Ravens over the past year. Team officials, though, have no plans to return the favor. Even though four key players have had toe problems at home since November, the Ravens are sticking with their Sportexe Momentum turf for the foreseeable future, attributing the injuries more to circumstance and footwear rather than surface. Deion Sanders was the first to go down when he hurt a toe against the Cleveland Browns midway through last season.
TRAVEL
By Knight Ridder / Tribune | September 25, 2005
No time to assemble the contents for your own travel tool kit? You can get one ready-made. Travel tool kits -- "a collection of approved products, services and information resources to prepare you for travel anywhere in the world," as the Web site etraveljournal.com explains it -- are handy to have. The suggestions below might not have all the contents you may want, but they represent a basic, good starter set for you to build on. Many such sites exist, and while we highly recommend a customized toolbox -- no one knows your travel choices better than you do -- visit these sites to see if they'll do the trick, at least for now. savvytraveler.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun fashion writer | August 21, 2005
Looking to nail down a place you can count on for a terrific manicure or pedicure? Here's a list of five we'd recommend around the Baltimore area. The prices and services vary, but each has something special to offer. About Faces Salon & Day Spa, 110 W. Timonium Road, Timonium A classic mani/pedi will run you $54, but for an additional $21, you can get the spa treatment, which includes a 10-minute massage and a refreshing cool mint mask. The hit: This is Kelly Ripken's manicure spot.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2005
My father used to say that you need the right tools to do the job right, but he was talking about screwdrivers. The same is true in the kitchen, where cookbook author and housewares consultant Jamee Ruth makes it her mission to get cooks comfortable with their tools. What exactly is a braiser? Or the difference between a saucepan and a saucier? Didn't the cast-iron skillet go out with washing clothes in the river? In her new book, The Cookware Cookbook (Chronicle Books, 2005, $18.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | May 5, 2005
SOME OF the new music I've enjoyed the most boasts lean, quirky productions -- uncluttered soundscapes with slick, undeniable hooks. I'm thinking about Gwen Stefani's "Hollaback Girl," which sits atop Billboard's Hot 100, and the Ying Yang Twins' "Wait (The Whisper Song)." It's not always about the lyrics, which, in pop especially, can be painfully trite -- even if they are catchy. (The Game and 50 Cent's "How We Do" and Brooke Valentine's "Girlfight" come to mind.) It's all about the production, really: the placement of guitar lines, the beat, the overall sound of the record that pulls us in. The production of the new releases on this week's playlist ranges from a bit familiar but adventurous to nauseatingly predictable with a few OK moments here and there: Nine Inch Nails, With Teeth: That jarring industrial rock sound spearheaded by NIN was hot in the mid-'90s, around the same time Nirvana blew up. Trent Reznor, the man who records as Nine Inch Nails, is back with an album that echoes The Downward Spiral, his hit 1994 set. With Teeth retains the lyrical bleakness and misery associated with the Ohio native's music.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2005
At first glance, the rambling old barn seems unremarkable in a countryside dotted with aging farm buildings. But the sturdy interior of this building at Coldsprings Farms in western Carroll County merits another look. Its log construction is an engineering feat that stands as a testament to 18th-century workmanship. Its 50-foot beams, made of chestnut logs sawed, hewn and set by hand, have weathered centuries of wind and storms. The logs were notched together to form the walls and ceiling and floor.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2005
KITCHENER, Ontario - Twenty-four hours after giving one of the worst performances of her career, Kimmie Meissner bounced back with a rock-solid routine last night at the Junior World Figure Skating Championships. Skating to Debussy's Reverie, the defending silver medalist executed everything on her eight-element short program, including the triple lutz that had vexed her, to finish in third place. "I wasn't as nervous as I was at qualifiers. I was excited," she said. "Everything felt really good."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2005
John P. "No Nails" Costello, a retired Bethlehem Steel Corp. carpenter and active church member, died of cancer Sunday at his home in Baltimore's Eastwood neighborhood. He was 84. Mr. Costello was born and raised in Mount Carmel, Pa., the son of Italian immigrant parents from Naples. After graduation from high school, he joined the Civilian Conservation Corps and was assigned to camps throughout the Northeast. During World War II, he enlisted in the Navy and was a cook aboard trains transporting naval personnel to the West Coast.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.