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August 22, 2013
Harford County Government Public Information Officer Sherrie Johnson received the John H. Murphy Award for excellence in journalism. Johnson was honored Saturday during the 2013 NAACP Freedom Fighter Awards Breakfast. Johnson and several others received the awards for service and leadership in the community. The NAACP Baltimore branch recognized the award recipients for commitment to social and racial equality as the nation celebrates the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington.
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NEWS
August 1, 2013
Does anyone besides me get irritated at the hypocrisy and race-baiting that is made worse by articles like the one penned by Auset Marion Lewis ("A river of tears for all the Trayvons," July 16)? It belonged in a bad romance novel instead of a theoretically legitimate paper, except the subject was tragic and the interpretation absurd and spurious. I can see her just happen to be walking into a Starbucks that just happened to be playing refrains from Jimmy Cliff, which would make her cry as she reflected on the terrible plight of African-Americans in America at the same time she worries about her hoodied nephew.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown picked up an attractive addition to his glory wall Monday as he collected a leadership award from the national NAACP at its gathering in Orlando for his efforts at repealing the death penalty in Maryland. Brown played a supporting role in Gov. Martin O'Malley's succesful effort to aboiish capital punishment -- a drive the governor undertook under the persistent urging of NAACP national President Benjamin Jealous. Jealous pointedly noted that Brown is attempting to become the first black governor of a state south of the Mason-Dixon Line since Virginia's L. Douglas Wilder was elected in 1989.  Brown praised the NAACP's efforts to end executions in the United States, calling the death penalty unfair, immoral and racially biased.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2013
The Baltimore-based NAACP and the pastor of a city mega-church were among those calling Sunday for a federal civil rights case against George Zimmerman after the Florida man was acquitted in the shooting death of an unarmed black teenager. Meanwhile, a crowd numbering between 300 and 400 rallied at Baltimore's Inner Harbor to register frustration and dismay with the late Saturday verdict in the death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. "It was like it was my child," said Debora Evans, 57, of Baltimore, who attended the rally and choked up when she spoke about the verdict.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 21, 2013
Rand Paul did just fine at Howard University, thank you very much. Or at least, that's how he remembers it. Mr. Paul, GOP senator from Kentucky, told the Christian Science Monitor on Wednesday that his recent visit to Howard didn't go so bad at all. He said any perception to the contrary was created by -- all together now -- the "left-wing media. " Knowing what we do about the political right's capacity for self-deception, we may trust that he's telling it like it is -- or at least, telling it like he believes it to be. But reality-based Americans know it wasn't left-wing media that insulted students at the historically black school by acting as if a visit to their campus was like a visit with headhunters.
NEWS
By Justin George and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
Workers were ordered out of the Baltimore building that hosts the national headquarters of the NAACP , after authorities received reports of a "suspicious letter," but the letter was later determined to be harmless. The FBI confirmed that agents had joined city fire and police officials in the 4800 block of Mt. Hope Dr. after receiving a report of a suspicious letter. "It's not uncommon for us to respond to something like that,"  said FBI spokesman Richard Wolf. " At about 1:45 p.m., Wolf said authorities had determined that the letter was "a non-hazard, non-suspicious letter.
NEWS
By Justin George and Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
NAACP employees were going through the mail Thursday at national headquarters in Baltimore when they found a strange-looking envelope. It bore no return address and had a Memphis, Tenn., postmark - just like letters to President Barack Obama and a Republican senator this week that tested positive for the deadly poison ricin. Within minutes, the FBI ordered workers to evacuate, and emergency responders rushed to the scene. It turned out to be a false alarm; the letter was a request for assistance.
NEWS
February 14, 2013
As Maryland lawmakers debate whether to ban capital punishment in the state, The Sun will host prominent advocates on both sides of the issue for its first Newsmaker Forum of 2013. National NAACP President Benjamin Todd Jealous, who has helped marshal support for the repeal effort, and Baltimore County State's Attorney Scott Shellenberger, an opponent of repeal, will answer questions from Sun editors and members of the audience. The event will take place from 7-8 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 21 at The Sun building, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore.
NEWS
January 27, 2013
You know the beverage industry is running scared when it feels driven to mount an all-out campaign against a New York City law passed last year banning the sale of super-size sodas and sugary drinks. But it's beyond shameless when that effort includes arm-twisting support for its cause from a group representing the very people who would benefit most from the law. Yet that's what played out in a New York courtroom last week, when the city's NAACP branch took the industry's side by arguing that the ban on sugary drinks in containers larger than 16 ounces, which was strongly endorsed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg, would unfairly hurt residents in African-American communities.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
Maryland's highest court has ruled that the state police must give the NAACP access to internal affairs files on racial profiling complaints. The civil rights group had requested the documents under the Maryland Public Information Act but the police agency denied the request, saying the records were protected personnel files. The Maryland Court of Appeals rejected that argument, agreeing with a Baltimore County court that the information could be shared if identifying information is redacted.
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