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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
The NAACP is vowing to mount in Annapolis its largest-ever effort to abolish the death penalty in a state, saying Maryland's historic role in the civil rights movement makes it an appropriate place for the push. In an interview, NAACP President Ben Jealous said Maryland is the civil rights organization's top priority in its broader campaign to eliminate capital punishment from the American justice system. He said the group will spend more than it ever has in a state as it rallies citizens to pressure lawmakers for repeal.
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NEWS
By Justin George and Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
NAACP employees were going through the mail Thursday at national headquarters in Baltimore when they found a strange-looking envelope. It bore no return address and had a Memphis, Tenn., postmark - just like letters to President Barack Obama and a Republican senator this week that tested positive for the deadly poison ricin. Within minutes, the FBI ordered workers to evacuate, and emergency responders rushed to the scene. It turned out to be a false alarm; the letter was a request for assistance.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2014
He'd been leader of a New Jersey social justice organization since 2008, making inroads on housing and employment issues, when Cornell Brooks, a soft-spoken lawyer and minister, got an opportunity he didn't see coming. The NAACP, a national organization based in Northwest Baltimore, was looking for a new president. A search committee wanted to talk. He had to decide whether to seek the job as successor to the charming, sometimes controversial Ben Jealous.  A friend remembers telling the 53-year-old Brooks that it might be hard to handle the competing factions within the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, which has a famously unwieldy 64-person board, hundreds of local branches and periodic financial problems.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | October 24, 1994
The NAACP will not pay the Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., its recently fired executive director, any of the more than $300,000 in salary due on the balance of his three-year contract, according to a settlement agreement to be made public today.Sources close to parties on both sides of the agreement said the Baltimore-based civil rights group would pay only $7,400 to cover two mortgage payments on Dr. Chavis' Ellicott City home, as well as extend his family's medical benefits and his life insurance through April.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | June 24, 1994
Burdened by a $2.7 million financial deficit, the NAACP has dismissed 10 employees and expects to cut the staff at its Northwest Baltimore headquarters by another 10 over the summer.The Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., the civil rights group's executive director, said the moves were part of a major reorganization of the NAACP. He contended that the "financial situation did not trigger the reorganization."However, Dr. Chavis, who became the NAACP's chief executive in April 1993, said:* The organization's general fund was $900,000 in the red last year, adding to an existing deficit.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | February 10, 1995
Washington. -- I had recently decided that the NAACP was doomed; that a once-great social and political force was beyond salvation because of the greed, corruption, venality and egomaniacal ignorance of some of its leaders.I knew that there was no way to get enough donations to wipe out the NAACP's $4.5 million debt when previous supporters were saying ''No more money!'' or even filing lawsuits against the organization that was the essence of integrity and nation-changing influence in the days of Thurgood Marshall, Roy Wilkins, Walter White -- and, yes, a Mississippi leader named Medgar Evers.
NEWS
October 9, 1994
When the NAACP national board of directors ousted Executive Director Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. last August for secretly settling a sex discrimination suit with organization funds, we suspected Mr. Chavis' downfall might foreshadow the fate of his patron and mentor, NAACP Board Chairman William F. Gibson. Now it appears the other shoe may indeed be about to drop.Syndicated columnist Carl Rowan has quoted unnamed sources who accuse the board chairman of "double-dipping" thousands of dollars in expense reimbursements from the civil rights group and using an NAACP credit card to finance a pattern of lavish spending that has drained the group's coffers of well over $500,000 since 1986.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | June 21, 1995
Despite the need to pay off $3.8 million in debts, the NAACP has dismissed its longtime fund-raiser -- who is now one of the group's major creditors.Gilbert Jonas, who had worked under contract with the NAACP since 1965, said yesterday that the nation's oldest and largest civil rights group owes him more than $394,000. Mr. Jonas, who closed his New York office last week, said he would file suit to collect.Mr. Jonas charged that officials at the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People "spoon-fed" him token payments so he would continue to raise funds -- money he says was mismanaged.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | February 6, 1994
Drawing its tiny but committed membership from the 2 percent of Carroll's population that is black, the county chapter of the NAACP wants to solve the problems facing black residents of the county.But those black residents don't seem to want to take part in the struggle."Carroll County African-Americans have always been slow to motivate, to get into action," said the Rev. Mary D. Carter-Cross, the Carroll NAACP president."They are too complacent out here, knowing that there are problems and not wanting to do anything about it," she said.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | August 3, 1994
Washington. -- It is sickening to watch the death of the NAACP, a once-proud organization now being strangled by two incredibly arrogant leaders.This oldest and once most-feared, most-respected of all the nation's civil-rights groups will soon sink into pitiable irrelevance, bankruptcy and shame unless a majority of its board of directors can rescue it from its chairman, William F. Gibson, a South Carolina dentist, and its executive director, Benjamin F....
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