Advertisement
HomeCollectionsNaacp
IN THE NEWS

Naacp

NEWS
February 21, 1992
When Benjamin L. Hooks became executive director of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1977, Jimmy Carter was in the White House and civil rights organizations had a generally sympathetic reception in the White House and Washington.But most of Mr. Hooks' tenure as one of the nation's most prominent advocates for the African-American community has been consumed by problems he could not have anticipated. The advent of the Reagan and Bush administrations, the increasingly conservative tone of the Supreme Court and the heightened importance of economic issues changed the nature of the game and the demands on black leaders.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Charles G. Tildon Jr | July 14, 2000
A CAREFUL examination of the history of African-Americans reveals a strong, determined, compassionate, resilient, faithful people. In our efforts to survive while reaching for the "American dream," we have demonstrated a genetic strength, a spiritual dominance and ability to defy the odds as we experienced one of the most unique forms of oppression and human degradation the world has ever known. Despite constant shifts in positions and changes in the rules designed to maintain this oppression by those in power, many African-Americans have succeeded in approaching some participation in the way of life enjoyed by the majority population.
NEWS
By Derrick Bell | August 30, 1994
NEW YORK -- GIVEN THE events of recent months, advocates of racial equality may be forgiven for thinking -- to paraphrase Shakespeare -- that this is the summer of our discontent. The publicly displayed disarray in the NAACP -- the oldest and most respected of the nation's civil-rights organizations -- is the latest in a steady parade of falls from grace by blacks who had become icons of success. Each of these developments receive maximum media exposure, as the depictions of our distress become grist for society's diversion.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2012
When an African-American was accused of raping a white woman and another of murdering a white locomotive engineer, Springfield, Ill., exploded into a race riot on the evening of Aug. 14, 1908. The mob grew furious when they learned that the two men had been spirited away to Bloomington, Ill., by the sheriff. Sensing trouble, Gov. Charles S. Deneen sent the National Guard to the city to restore order, but the rioters were not to be stopped. After destroying a small black business district, the mob turned its fury on Badlands, a black neighborhood, where they burned some 40 homes while a crowd of 5,000 spectators looked on. An African-American barber who had tried to defend his shop was lynched.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | October 24, 1994
The NAACP will not pay the Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., its recently fired executive director, any of the more than $300,000 in salary due on the balance of his three-year contract, according to a settlement agreement to be made public today.Sources close to parties on both sides of the agreement said the Baltimore-based civil rights group would pay only $7,400 to cover two mortgage payments on Dr. Chavis' Ellicott City home, as well as extend his family's medical benefits and his life insurance through April.
NEWS
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | October 18, 1991
The Baltimore County branch of the NAACP resoundly rejected the redistricting plan approved by the county House delegation and presented its own plan last night."
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | June 24, 1994
Burdened by a $2.7 million financial deficit, the NAACP has dismissed 10 employees and expects to cut the staff at its Northwest Baltimore headquarters by another 10 over the summer.The Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., the civil rights group's executive director, said the moves were part of a major reorganization of the NAACP. He contended that the "financial situation did not trigger the reorganization."However, Dr. Chavis, who became the NAACP's chief executive in April 1993, said:* The organization's general fund was $900,000 in the red last year, adding to an existing deficit.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | February 10, 1995
Washington. -- I had recently decided that the NAACP was doomed; that a once-great social and political force was beyond salvation because of the greed, corruption, venality and egomaniacal ignorance of some of its leaders.I knew that there was no way to get enough donations to wipe out the NAACP's $4.5 million debt when previous supporters were saying ''No more money!'' or even filing lawsuits against the organization that was the essence of integrity and nation-changing influence in the days of Thurgood Marshall, Roy Wilkins, Walter White -- and, yes, a Mississippi leader named Medgar Evers.
NEWS
October 9, 1994
When the NAACP national board of directors ousted Executive Director Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. last August for secretly settling a sex discrimination suit with organization funds, we suspected Mr. Chavis' downfall might foreshadow the fate of his patron and mentor, NAACP Board Chairman William F. Gibson. Now it appears the other shoe may indeed be about to drop.Syndicated columnist Carl Rowan has quoted unnamed sources who accuse the board chairman of "double-dipping" thousands of dollars in expense reimbursements from the civil rights group and using an NAACP credit card to finance a pattern of lavish spending that has drained the group's coffers of well over $500,000 since 1986.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | June 21, 1995
Despite the need to pay off $3.8 million in debts, the NAACP has dismissed its longtime fund-raiser -- who is now one of the group's major creditors.Gilbert Jonas, who had worked under contract with the NAACP since 1965, said yesterday that the nation's oldest and largest civil rights group owes him more than $394,000. Mr. Jonas, who closed his New York office last week, said he would file suit to collect.Mr. Jonas charged that officials at the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People "spoon-fed" him token payments so he would continue to raise funds -- money he says was mismanaged.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.