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By Kelly Brewington and David L. Greene and Kelly Brewington and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2004
After four years of refusing to meet with the nation's oldest and largest civil rights group, President Bush sat down at the White House yesterday with NAACP President Kweisi Mfume. Mfume called it a "very frank, open meeting" that he hoped would mark the end of a rocky relationship between the president and the leadership of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Bush spoke to the group while campaigning in 2000 but did not accept invitations thereafter. The estrangement came to a head when Bush refused to speak at the NAACP's annual convention in Philadelphia this summer, blaming rhetoric and name-calling from its leaders.
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By Greg Barrett and Greg Barrett,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2004
It's not the large shoes of former NAACP President Kweisi Mfume that drives interim President Dennis C. Hayes to work 16-hour days. Rather, a trail of boot prints left in his home 40 years ago by a white city worker pushes him to single-mindedly track acts of racial injustice. Asked recently to reflect on his decision to devote a life to fighting for civil rights, Hayes, 53 and single, returned to an incident in his childhood in segregated Indianapolis. He was 13, one of nine children raised by his mother, Nadine Hayes, in a three-bedroom, one-bathroom house.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2004
NAACP Chairman Julian Bond named a nine-member search committee yesterday to replace Kweisi Mfume, who announced last week his resignation as president of the Baltimore-based civil rights group. The committee includes members and staff of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, as well as people from outside the organization. In addition to Bond, they are NAACP Vice Chairwoman Roslyn Brock; NAACP board member Rupert Richardson; Jack Kemp, a former Republican congressman from New York and former secretary of Housing and Urban Development; Hugh B. Price, former president of the National Urban League; NAACP board member Alice Huffman; Philip Murphy, managing director of the investment management division at Goldman Sachs & Co. and board member of the NAACP Special Contribution Fund; Coleman Peterson, president of Hollis Enterprises LLC and board member of the NAACP Special Contribution Fund; and Nicholas Wiggins, a member of the NAACP youth board.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2004
Kweisi Mfume, a former Baltimore City councilman and U.S. congressman who has led the NAACP for the past nine years, is expected to announce his resignation from the civil rights organization today. A source with knowledge of the announcement said last night that Mfume is leaving voluntarily to explore opportunities including television, business or politics. Mfume, 56, has said he would like time off to spend with his six sons, the youngest of whom is 14. He also reportedly is looking forward to a break from the punishing schedule of leading the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the nation's oldest and largest civil rights group.
NEWS
July 13, 2004
FOUR YEARS ago, George W. Bush approached the NAACP convention in Baltimore with charming aplomb. The Republican presidential candidate knew he wasn't likely to pick up many votes from the overwhelmingly black organization, which differed sharply with him and his party on a wide range of issues. But he went in armed with self-deprecating humor, and the admonition that "our nation is harmed when we let our differences separate us and divide us." President Bush proved to be prophetic about that, and nowhere is it more evident than in his refusal to speak to this year's NAACP convention, now under way in Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2003
The city's top public safety officials -- Police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark, State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy and Mayor Martin O'Malley -- met privately yesterday to discuss a prominent civil rights organization's concerns that political infighting has hampered coordinated crime fighting. G.I. Johnson, president of Baltimore's National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, invited the officials to his West 26th Street office to express his group's concerns about improving public safety.
NEWS
By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 1, 2003
The NAACP will be able to fly its civil rights banner on a worldwide stage if a United Nations committee approves its application to become a "non-governmental organization." The NGO application for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is in the final stages of approval and should be completed no later than July, a U.N. spokesman said yesterday. The NAACP is seeking consultative status with the U.N. Economic and Social Council; 2,234 NGOs work with the council in areas such as human rights and international health, economic and social problems.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 11, 2001
NEW ORLEANS - NAACP President Kweisi Mfume urged sanctions yesterday against the paint industry and states and cities that don't follow federal regulations to cut exposure to lead paint. "We call today on this president and on this Congress to take federal action by withholding dollars to states that are not complying [with] basic requirements of the Medicaid bill and Medicaid funding that they get," Mfume said. "We believe that funding ought to end." He said he and President Bush need to work together on lead paint and other racially sensitive issues.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2001
KWEISI MFUME for governor? Or senator? Not likely for now, but possible - someday. As part of a wide-ranging interview with The Sun, the NAACP president cautiously expressed an interest in both offices. But the former Baltimore congressman quickly sought to discourage a "draft movement," saying he hasn't finished what he started as head of the civil rights organization. No matter how cautious and tentative, his words could bring hope to that small band of pundits and political insiders who are desperately seeking an alternative to Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend's genteel juggernaut toward the Democratic nomination and the State House.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 9, 2001
WASHINGTON - House Majority Leader Dick Armey and NAACP President Kweisi Mfume discussed everything from proposed tax cuts to racial profiling yesterday during a meeting in Armey's Capitol office that followed weeks of heated accusations from both sides. The hourlong meeting was closed to the news media, but the two men held a news conference shortly afterward, with the Texas Republican declaring that "Kweisi Mfume and I just had a wonderful visit." Armey, standing next to Mfume at a podium outside the Capitol, said education, economics, hate crimes and racial profiling were among the issues discussed.
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