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By GREGORY KANE | May 10, 2006
Baltimore leaders, civic and political, are tripping over one another in the rush to pucker up and kiss the feet of NAACP board chairman Julian Bond in an attempt to keep the civil rights organization's national headquarters in Baltimore. A tip of the hat and my hearty gratitude to the politician or civic leader who will tell Bond, "Well, get to steppin', partner." The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People since Bond took the helm as chairman isn't your granddaddy's NAACP.
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NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | January 15, 2006
With his corporate background and lean civil rights credentials, Bruce S. Gordon raised eyebrows when he was named head of the nation's oldest civil rights group almost seven months ago. But what's been perhaps more surprising since Gordon took the helm at the Baltimore-based National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is the issue for which he's gained the most attention - his vocal, high-profile support of convicted killer Stanley "Tookie"...
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2005
As NAACP delegates gather this weekend in Milwaukee for the group's 96th convention, it will mark a year since Chairman Julian Bond's searing critique of the Bush administration, triggering an IRS audit that nearly cost the organization its tax-exempt status. Today, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and President Bush remain at odds. The civil rights group continues to fight the Internal Revenue Service investigation. And for the fifth year in a row, Bush has declined an invitation to speak at the convention.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
ATLANTA - Saying a dedication to civil rights activism is in his blood, former Verizon executive Bruce S. Gordon was elected as the NAACP's next president and chief executive officer yesterday. The board of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People unanimously selected Gordon in a four-hour closed meeting at the Atlanta Airport Marriott, NAACP Chairman Julian Bond said. The 59-year-old retired president of Verizon's Retail Markets Group was the sole finalist for the job. "To people who ask: Why did they chose this corporate guy, what does he have, what will he do?
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and JoAnna Daemmrich and Ivan Penn and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2004
Kweisi Mfume's abrupt departure as head of the NAACP left some observers wondering where he will go - and whether there's more to why he left. He said yesterday that he wanted a vacation after nearly nine years, and he might explore opportunities in television, business or politics. "Kweisi's capable of doing anything he wants to do, whenever he wants to do it," said Arthur Murphy, a longtime Baltimore political consultant. "He's an incredible American success story." But others wondered whether the entire story of his departure has yet to be told, particularly given long-standing tensions among the group's top leadership.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2004
PHILADELPHIA - Civil rights pioneer and NAACP Chairman Julian Bond continued to express the civil rights organization's frustration with President Bush yesterday, delivering a stinging criticism of his administration's policies from civil rights to the war in Iraq while lamenting the 2000 election debacle as an "outright theft of black votes." Bond's remarks follow the chiding of Bush by NAACP President Kweisi Mfume as the first sitting president since Herbert Hoover not to address the group.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and Michael Dresser and David L. Greene and Michael Dresser,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 10, 2004
YORK, Pa. - President Bush leveled an unusual attack on the NAACP's leadership yesterday, saying his relationship with those in charge of the Baltimore-based civil rights group has deteriorated to the point that it scarcely exists. Bush spoke in response to a reporter's question about why he has again chosen not to attend the NAACP's annual convention, which begins this weekend in Philadelphia. He is the first president in more than 70 years who has not attended a single NAACP convention, a fact that has angered the group's leaders.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2003
About 14,800 Maryland customers remained without electricity in their homes last night, one week after Tropical Storm Isabel struck, as NAACP President Kweisi Mfume joined a chorus of leaders calling for a formal explanation from providers. Mfume said yesterday that he was moved to write letters to Maryland lawmakers requesting hearings after talking to residents throughout the state. He questioned whether utility companies under deregulation have failed to invest enough in tree trimming, maintenance and staff to prepare for events such as occurred last week.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2001
Joseph Bond was elected president last night of the Harford County NAACP chapter, bringing to a close a year of turmoil for the civil rights organization. Bond won by a vote of 79 to 57 in the balloting, which took place at Union United Methodist Church in Aberdeen. He was immediately sworn in by William Penn, national administrator for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Bond said he wants to get the NAACP "back on target," focusing on school and civil rights issues, fair employment practices and recruitment of younger members.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2001
The president of the Anne Arundel County chapter of the NAACP heralded a new era of open communications between county officials and African-American communities after meeting yesterday with County Executive Janet S. Owens. "I always felt that [county officials] had that [anti-hate crimes] posture," said Gerald G. Stansbury, president of the local chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. "But there lacked communication between the county and the community.
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