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NEWS
December 6, 2009
The Howard County NAACP Youth Council will host a reception celebrating the 100th anniversary of the NAACP from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday at the Ridgelys Run Community Center, 8400 Mission Road in Jessup. Free event recognizes several Howard County individuals and organizations that have supported the youth council. Call 443-280-1935 for more information.
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NEWS
By Zoë Read, Baltimore Sun Media Group | August 22, 2014
Candles brightened the night Thursday as hundreds of people held up signs and chanted “Stop, don't shoot” outside a historic Glen Burnie church in remembrance of two young African-American men killed in shootings. The Anne Arundel County chapter of the NAACP led the rally at John Wesley United Methodist Church, saying it is seeking justice for Kendall Green of Glen Burnie and Michael Brown of Ferguson, Mo. The event was attended by about 200 people, including the Green family, local politicians and Anne Arundel County police.
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NEWS
March 29, 2012
Regarding the NAACP's recent rally for Trayvon Martin in Baltimore, I thought one of the goals of the organization was to improve race relations, not worsen them ("'We are Trayvon,' marchers proclaim," March 27). I am as outraged as anyone about the horrible fate that befell Trayvon, but how is the death of this young man any different than the hundreds of other innocent young black men slain every year In this country? The answer is: The race of the murderer. If the NAACP wanted to advance its goals, it would hold a rally every day, not just to shine a spotlight on mixed race-violence when the victim is black.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
The local branch of the NAACP spoke prematurely last week when it announced that the organization's 2016 national convention would be held in Baltimore, a spokeswoman from the national headquarters said Thursday. A panel is still in the process of evaluating four cities, including Baltimore, as potential sites for the event, said Michelle Nealy of the association's national office, and will not make its recommendation to a committee of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's national board of directors until October.
NEWS
August 16, 2010
It is always nice to win. That is our first reaction to the news late last week that the national headquarters of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People — and its 80 or so jobs are staying in Baltimore instead of moving to Washington. This was a bit of a surprise, because for some years now it looked as if the venerable civil-rights organization's one-time leaders, Julian Bond and Bruce S. Gordon, were intent on relocating the headquarters from Seton Business Park in Northwest Baltimore to the Washington area or another location outside the city.
NEWS
September 9, 2013
When Benjamin Jealous, at 35, became the youngest person ever to lead the NAACP in 2008, he took over an institution with a venerable name but whose greatest triumphs appeared to lie in the past. Mr. Jealous, who announced last week that he will step down from his post as president of the nation's oldest civil rights organization in January, quickly set about changing that, working to attract a younger generation of members with a more expansive vision of civil rights that addresses contemporary concerns.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | December 12, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley is set to meet with NAACP president Benjamin Jealous Thursday morning to discuss topics including repealing the death penalty, according to a spokeswoman for the governor. The meeting, planned for 9:30 a.m. at the state house, was granted at Jealous's request. "They are meeting," said O'Malley spokeswoman Raquel Guillory. "The death penalty will be a topic of discussion. " The NAACP will hold a news conference after the meeting. This year, the civil rights organization plans a major push for full repeal of the death penalty.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS Jr | September 4, 1994
Miami. -- The NAACP has, in perception and perhaps in actual fact, ceased to be of much relevance to black America's struggle. Consider: The venerable civil-rights organization is now generating more passion and excitement than it has in years -- not for some bold new initiative, but for sacking its scandal-tainted executive director, Benjamin F. Chavis.That says something.So does this: Some months ago, I was asked by Vibe, a national magazine for young blacks, to assess the NAACP's importance, if any, to its audience.
NEWS
July 9, 1991
Rarely in its history has the NAACP had a greater opportunity to exert a major influence than it has this week as the organization considers, at its Houston convention, whether to endorse the nomination of Clarence Thomas for the Supreme Court.If the NAACP endorses Thomas, few senators are likely to vote against one who was nominated by a conservative president and approved by the nation's preeminent civil rights organization. But if the NAACP should add its voice to those opposing Thomas, Senate approval would be anything but certain.
NEWS
February 13, 1995
In announcing her candidacy for the chairmanship of the troubled NAACP last week, Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of slain civil rights leader Medgar Evers, offered a ray of hope.Ms. Evers-Williams is a former corporate executive and commissioner of the Los Angeles Board of Public Works, where she oversaw a $1 billion budget and 7,000 employees. She is qualified to lead the nation's oldest civil rights group back to health. Whether that hope is realized depends on the willingness of the NAACP's fractious board to do the right thing when it meets Saturday.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Racial disparities in the restaurant labor force of BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport are hurting African-American employees and contributing to poverty in Baltimore, according to a study released Monday by the national labor organization Unite Here. Officials with AirMall USA, which subcontracts concessions operations at the airport for the Maryland Aviation Administration, rebutted the findings. The study, which Unite Here produced in collaboration with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, found African-American employees disproportionately work in low-wage positions at fast-food chains and in the back of airport restaurants as dishwashers and cooks, while white employees tend to fill higher-paying, front-of-house jobs as bartenders and servers.
NEWS
June 12, 2014
Sunday, June 15 Dixieland music The U.S. Air Force Heritage Ramblers Dixie Ensemble will perform at 3 p.m. at the Chesapeake Arts Center, 194 Hammonds Lane in Brooklyn Park. Free admission. Information: 410-636-6597 or heritageofamericaband.af.mil. Father's Day concert Congregation Kneseth Israel presents violinist Yosef Yankelev, baritone Shouvik Mondle and tenor Moshe Weisblum, accompanied by pianist Diane Kinsley, at 3 p.m. at 1125 Spa Road in Annapolis. The program will feature selections from Bach and Klezmer, and the Maryland premieres of Yankelev's arrangement of "My Yiddishe Mama" and Mondle's rendition of traditional Hindu semiclassical music.
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | May 25, 2014
While Cornell William Brooks may be a surprising choice to lead the NAACP, it takes neither an Einstein nor a soothsayer to know what challenges lie ahead for the clergyman-lawyer little known beyond his social justice network in New Jersey. Three words: money, membership, mission. The NAACP, headquartered in Baltimore, has always had difficulty financing the cause of freedom. The new chief has been tasked with increasing both fundraising and membership by 20 percent - a tall order for an organization that too many people look to only in times of personal peril.
NEWS
May 25, 2014
Thank goodness someone from the African-American community has spoken up about the leadership and the fading star of the NAACP ( "Jealous' legacy at the NAACP is far from laudable," May 21). Until there is new leadership and one who refuses to be a pawn of a political party, the NAACP will continue to become irrelevant for many of its constituents because of the obvious bias. I don't know new NAACP President Cornell Brooks, and that seems to be a problem that few do know him, but maybe he can provide necessary leadership and the media will not continue to go to Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson as spokesmen for the African-American community.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2014
He'd been leader of a New Jersey social justice organization since 2008, making inroads on housing and employment issues, when Cornell Brooks, a soft-spoken lawyer and minister, got an opportunity he didn't see coming. The NAACP, a national organization based in Northwest Baltimore, was looking for a new president. A search committee wanted to talk. He had to decide whether to seek the job as successor to the charming, sometimes controversial Ben Jealous.  A friend remembers telling the 53-year-old Brooks that it might be hard to handle the competing factions within the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, which has a famously unwieldy 64-person board, hundreds of local branches and periodic financial problems.
NEWS
May 21, 2014
I strongly disagree with your account on Ben Jealous' legacy as NAACP president, as well as with your reporter's poll of "civil rights leaders" called to vouch for the pick of Cornell William Brooks as Mr. Jealous' successor ( "Attorney Cornell Brooks to Lead NAACP," May 18). Mr. Jealous often embarrassed the NAACP; for example, in contravention of long standing NAACP policy, he backed deliberately separate, homogeneous homerooms for black boys and black girls at an otherwise integrated public high school in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
August 1, 1991
In confronting the difficult question of whether to endorse or oppose Clarence Thomas's nomination for the United States Supreme Court, the NAACP faced a painful choice between principle and pragmatism.On the issue of principle, there can be little doubt that were Thomas a white man with the same record he has compiled in his private and public life, the NAACP would be fighting the nomination tooth-and-nail.On the pragmatic side, there is the virtual certainty that if Thomas is defeated, the next nominee would be just as conservative as Thomas -- and not black.
NEWS
June 2, 2012
It is apparent that the NAACP has lost its moral compass because they feel they must stand with a black president and not their Christian roots when it comes to defining marriage and the rights and privileges associated with it ("Favoring equality," May 29). They have been losing credibility with many of us for years because they are often hypocritical and this one takes the cake. I hope those blacks who disagree with their position consider fleeing their membership and spending their energy and resources with their churches and communities.
NEWS
May 19, 2014
Cornell Brooks is inheriting the leadership of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People at a time when the nation's oldest civil rights organization is experiencing a resurgence of influence and membership in its long struggle for equal rights. Mr. Brooks, whose appointment as NAACP chief was announced Saturday, is a lawyer, minister and long-time civil rights activist who is well equipped to carry forward the new initiatives begun in 2008 by his predecessor, Benjamin Jealous.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
Cornell William Brooks, an attorney and minister from Northern Virginia, will lead the nation's oldest and largest civil rights organization at a time when the NAACP is experiencing a resurgence in influence and recruitment but struggling with budget issues. Brooks, whose appointment was announced Saturday, becomes the 18th person to oversee the Baltimore-based group, which includes more than 2,000 local units nationwide. As CEO, the 53-year-old Brooks follows Benjamin Jealous, whom many credit for helping to modernize the NAACP and return it to prominence.
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