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NEWS
December 6, 2009
The Howard County NAACP Youth Council will host a reception celebrating the 100th anniversary of the NAACP from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday at the Ridgelys Run Community Center, 8400 Mission Road in Jessup. Free event recognizes several Howard County individuals and organizations that have supported the youth council. Call 443-280-1935 for more information.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
A national black firefighters association and African-American leaders in Anne Arundel County are criticizing state officials for allowing an all-white class of firefighter recruits at BWI Marshall Airport. The new class of firefighters, which started on the job last month, is composed of nine white men, airport spokesman Jonathan Dean confirmed. With their arrival, the Maryland Aviation Administration's 89-person fire and rescue department became 26 percent minority and women, and 13 percent African-American, he said.
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NEWS
March 29, 2012
Regarding the NAACP's recent rally for Trayvon Martin in Baltimore, I thought one of the goals of the organization was to improve race relations, not worsen them ("'We are Trayvon,' marchers proclaim," March 27). I am as outraged as anyone about the horrible fate that befell Trayvon, but how is the death of this young man any different than the hundreds of other innocent young black men slain every year In this country? The answer is: The race of the murderer. If the NAACP wanted to advance its goals, it would hold a rally every day, not just to shine a spotlight on mixed race-violence when the victim is black.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
Former NAACP President and CEO Benjamin Jealous, who stepped down in December, is joining a West Coast venture capital firm specializing in startups that diversify the tech industry and aim to have a positive social impact. Jealous, who will continue to reside in Silver Spring, will become a partner in the Kapor Center for Social Impact, joining entrepreneurs and center co-founders Mitchell Kapor and Freada Kapor Klein, the center said Tuesday. Kapor, which backs firms through its investment arm, Kapor Capital, works to close gaps in access, opportunity, wealth and participation.
NEWS
August 16, 2010
It is always nice to win. That is our first reaction to the news late last week that the national headquarters of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People — and its 80 or so jobs are staying in Baltimore instead of moving to Washington. This was a bit of a surprise, because for some years now it looked as if the venerable civil-rights organization's one-time leaders, Julian Bond and Bruce S. Gordon, were intent on relocating the headquarters from Seton Business Park in Northwest Baltimore to the Washington area or another location outside the city.
NEWS
September 9, 2013
When Benjamin Jealous, at 35, became the youngest person ever to lead the NAACP in 2008, he took over an institution with a venerable name but whose greatest triumphs appeared to lie in the past. Mr. Jealous, who announced last week that he will step down from his post as president of the nation's oldest civil rights organization in January, quickly set about changing that, working to attract a younger generation of members with a more expansive vision of civil rights that addresses contemporary concerns.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | December 12, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley is set to meet with NAACP president Benjamin Jealous Thursday morning to discuss topics including repealing the death penalty, according to a spokeswoman for the governor. The meeting, planned for 9:30 a.m. at the state house, was granted at Jealous's request. "They are meeting," said O'Malley spokeswoman Raquel Guillory. "The death penalty will be a topic of discussion. " The NAACP will hold a news conference after the meeting. This year, the civil rights organization plans a major push for full repeal of the death penalty.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS Jr | September 4, 1994
Miami. -- The NAACP has, in perception and perhaps in actual fact, ceased to be of much relevance to black America's struggle. Consider: The venerable civil-rights organization is now generating more passion and excitement than it has in years -- not for some bold new initiative, but for sacking its scandal-tainted executive director, Benjamin F. Chavis.That says something.So does this: Some months ago, I was asked by Vibe, a national magazine for young blacks, to assess the NAACP's importance, if any, to its audience.
NEWS
February 13, 1995
In announcing her candidacy for the chairmanship of the troubled NAACP last week, Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of slain civil rights leader Medgar Evers, offered a ray of hope.Ms. Evers-Williams is a former corporate executive and commissioner of the Los Angeles Board of Public Works, where she oversaw a $1 billion budget and 7,000 employees. She is qualified to lead the nation's oldest civil rights group back to health. Whether that hope is realized depends on the willingness of the NAACP's fractious board to do the right thing when it meets Saturday.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | October 7, 1994
Washington. -- Some Americans thought that when the NAACP board fired its executive director, Benjamin Chavis, after he used NAACP funds as ''hush money'' paid to a woman who charged him with sexual improprieties, the organization would quickly climb back to fiscal good health and national power.Not so. A crisis situation continues at the nation's oldest and once most-important civil-rights organization -- and not just because of a membership decline and a reluctance of big foundations and corporations to give money to it.Serious abuses of the meager funds of the NAACP have taken place for years, with Chairman William F. Gibson cited by some board members as the leading offender.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Magic Johnson may have survived for more than 20 years with HIV and is in apparent good health, but don't let the basketball legend's success story fool you. HIV and AIDS remain scourges in the African-American community, where experts say infection rates are higher than in any other demographic group — and rising fast. On Thursday, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People kicked off a campaign to enlist local pastors and ministers in spreading the word that the HIV-AIDs crisis in their communities is more severe than many realize, and that plenty can be done to help.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
Civil rights groups are pressing lawmakers in Annapolis to impose a six-month moratorium on home foreclosures, as the number of cases has surged in Maryland. But a banker's group and the O'Malley administration contend that there's already plenty of help available for struggling homeowners, and that the housing market can't fully rebound until delinquent mortgages are dealt with. Maryland had the third-highest foreclosure rate in the country last month, according to RealtyTrac, a firm that monitors such activity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2014
Author and Baltimore teacher Sheri Booker has won the NAACP Image Award for outstanding literary work by a debut author. Booker, a teacher at Baltimore Leadership School for Young Women and a graduate of both Notre Dame of Maryland University and Goucher College, won the award for her Baltimore-based memoir "Nine Years Under: Coming of Age in an Inner City Funeral Home," which recounts the nine years she spent working at the Wylie Funeral Home...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2014
Young buck. Buck wild. Make a buck. Buck the system. The buck stops here. "Buck" stops here. In his office at Morgan State University, MK Asante, the youngest professor ever to receive tenure at the school, is reflecting upon his teen years in the city he calls "Killadelphia, Pistolvania," and that are chronicled in his acclaimed recent memoir, "Buck. " "Buck" never was his nickname. Asante chose the title because he lived through nearly every variation of that "short but loaded" word and acted them out in roughly the order they're presented above.
NEWS
February 5, 2014
The State Board of Education passed a new school discipline policy that will have far-reaching effects on every subdivision in Maryland. Your editorial in support of the new policy was both predictable and disheartening ( "Keep them in class," Jan. 29). The new policy was favored by the Open Society Institute, Advocates for Children & Youth, the NAACP and the ACLU. It was opposed by teachers, principals, administrators, superintendents and most local boards of education. Gov. Martin O'Malley, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder also favor the new policy.
NEWS
January 2, 2014
Baltimore's NAACP president said the city's gun violence affects a wide range of residents, even if the victims themselves tend to be involved in the drug trade.  On Monday, Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts said gun violence was "localized" and "not throughout the city as a whole. " He said "80 to 85 percent" of the victims are black men involved in the drug trade, and said "everyday citizens" saw crime, such as burglary and car break-ins, drop in 2013.  Through a spokesman, Batts has declined to clarify or elaborate on the comment.
NEWS
June 2, 2012
It is apparent that the NAACP has lost its moral compass because they feel they must stand with a black president and not their Christian roots when it comes to defining marriage and the rights and privileges associated with it ("Favoring equality," May 29). They have been losing credibility with many of us for years because they are often hypocritical and this one takes the cake. I hope those blacks who disagree with their position consider fleeing their membership and spending their energy and resources with their churches and communities.
NEWS
December 29, 2013
In the spring of 2008, as the prospect that America would elect its first black president became more and more likely, the organization that did as much as any to make that watershed possible had fallen on hard times. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, America's oldest and best known civil rights group, was in disarray. It's last president and CEO had abruptly quit, and it had laid off half of its staff to balance the books. Its membership and relevance in what many were heralding as a post-racial America seemed destined to wane, and one of the defining institutions of the 20th century had no sure place in the 21st.
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