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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
The 172-year-old whaler Charles W. Morgan, the nation's oldest surviving merchant vessel, will emerge Sunday from an almost five-year, multimillion-dollar restoration effort headed by a former Marylander. Like a proud papa, Quentin Snediker, shipyard director at historic Mystic Seaport in Connecticut where the work was completed, will no doubt be beaming as the National Historic Landmark is lowered into the Mystic River in a public ceremony on the anniversary of its original launch in New Bedford, Mass., in 1841.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
While researching a column about the venerable 172-year-old whaling vessel Charles W. Morgan that was recently relaunched at Mystic Seaport in Connecticut after a restoration, I came upon a 1979 article in a yellowing Baltimore Sun library clip written by Jim Holechek, a retired Baltimore public relations executive and author. Jim, who wrote the "Boating" column in The Sunday Sun for years, told the tale of Joseph Gordon, who later was director of health information for the city Health Department and earned a footnote in maritime history as the Morgan's last stowaway.
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TRAVEL
November 15, 2009
My husband and I spent the first night of our honeymoon in August 1971 at Mystic Seaport. This summer we returned to Mystic, Conn., to celebrate our 38th wedding anniversary. I took this picture from the shore of old downtown Mystic, looking at the seaport, shortly before sunset. We were on our way to eat at Mystic Pizza, setting for the film "Mystic Pizza." The Baltimore Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot." Photos should have been taken within the past year and be accompanied by a description along with your name, address and phone number.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
The 172-year-old whaler Charles W. Morgan, the nation's oldest surviving merchant vessel, will emerge Sunday from an almost five-year, multimillion-dollar restoration effort headed by a former Marylander. Like a proud papa, Quentin Snediker, shipyard director at historic Mystic Seaport in Connecticut where the work was completed, will no doubt be beaming as the National Historic Landmark is lowered into the Mystic River in a public ceremony on the anniversary of its original launch in New Bedford, Mass., in 1841.
NEWS
By Vicki Wellford and Vicki Wellford,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 1997
THE RESULTS are in from Arundel Middle School's fall pentathlon, which included the long jump, shot put, 60-yard dash, 100-yard dash and 880-yard run. Points were awarded for each of the five events with up to 200 points possible for or a 1,000-point maximum.The winners were sixth-graders James Agarsor, 940 points, and Randi Innis, 870 points; seventh-graders Terrance Brown, 860 points, and Ashley Gray, 840 points; eighth-graders Mike Abrams, 970 points, Alex Viera, 845 points, and Kayla Broznowicz, 845 points.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
While researching a column about the venerable 172-year-old whaling vessel Charles W. Morgan that was recently relaunched at Mystic Seaport in Connecticut after a restoration, I came upon a 1979 article in a yellowing Baltimore Sun library clip written by Jim Holechek, a retired Baltimore public relations executive and author. Jim, who wrote the "Boating" column in The Sunday Sun for years, told the tale of Joseph Gordon, who later was director of health information for the city Health Department and earned a footnote in maritime history as the Morgan's last stowaway.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 23, 2005
LONG BEACH, Miss. -- Standing about 70 feet tall, Bienville, an 800-year-old live oak tree, once commanded attention in the front yard of Dr. Charles and Sandra Lobrano's Mississippi home. But after wrangling with Hurricane Katrina and taking a beating in the process, Bienville doesn't look as good as it used to. The tree is split down the middle: half standing defiantly, the other half pummeled to the ground. The hawks, owls and quail that used to perch on the tree's octopus-like branches aren't around much anymore.
NEWS
October 20, 1995
John Gardner, 90, a nationally renowned boat builder and former associate curator at the Mystic Seaport Museum, died Wednesday in Haverhill, Mass. He wrote five books about small watercraft. His latest, "Wooden Boats to Build and Use," will be published in June.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | July 28, 1991
For those who prefer the back roads, T. J. Harvey of Southbury, Conn., arranges self-driving tours through the New England countryside, with overnight stops at country inns. He calls it shunpiking, a word that has its origins in the Colonial era, when travelers sometimes took lengthy detours to avoid paying tolls to property owners.According to the client's needs, Mr. Harvey devises an itinerary and writes a guidebook specifically for the trip, tailored to such interests as antiquing, outlet shopping or visiting historic sites.
NEWS
December 23, 2007
Morton Gibbons-Neff Jr., a world-class sailor who oversaw a successful cattle-feeding operation and grain farm on the Eastern Shore, died Dec. 17 of complications from old age at Chester River Hospital Center. The Chestertown resident was 94. Born in Philadelphia, he attended Montgomery School and grew up sailing sneak boxes and E-Scows along New Jersey's Barnegat Bay. He attended the University of Pennsylvania before entering the Navy at the beginning of World War II, commanding submarine chasers along the East Coast and the Hawaiian islands.
TRAVEL
November 15, 2009
My husband and I spent the first night of our honeymoon in August 1971 at Mystic Seaport. This summer we returned to Mystic, Conn., to celebrate our 38th wedding anniversary. I took this picture from the shore of old downtown Mystic, looking at the seaport, shortly before sunset. We were on our way to eat at Mystic Pizza, setting for the film "Mystic Pizza." The Baltimore Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot." Photos should have been taken within the past year and be accompanied by a description along with your name, address and phone number.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 23, 2005
LONG BEACH, Miss. -- Standing about 70 feet tall, Bienville, an 800-year-old live oak tree, once commanded attention in the front yard of Dr. Charles and Sandra Lobrano's Mississippi home. But after wrangling with Hurricane Katrina and taking a beating in the process, Bienville doesn't look as good as it used to. The tree is split down the middle: half standing defiantly, the other half pummeled to the ground. The hawks, owls and quail that used to perch on the tree's octopus-like branches aren't around much anymore.
NEWS
By Vicki Wellford and Vicki Wellford,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 1997
THE RESULTS are in from Arundel Middle School's fall pentathlon, which included the long jump, shot put, 60-yard dash, 100-yard dash and 880-yard run. Points were awarded for each of the five events with up to 200 points possible for or a 1,000-point maximum.The winners were sixth-graders James Agarsor, 940 points, and Randi Innis, 870 points; seventh-graders Terrance Brown, 860 points, and Ashley Gray, 840 points; eighth-graders Mike Abrams, 970 points, Alex Viera, 845 points, and Kayla Broznowicz, 845 points.
TRAVEL
June 4, 2000
Finger Lakes guide points the way With 650 miles of shoreline, 1,063 waterfalls, 11 lakes and summer temperatures in the mid-80s, New York's Finger Lakes region is a tempting vacation spot. But how do you narrow the sights when there are so many from which to choose? The "Finger Lakes Region Travel Guide" ($4) gives the skinny on area activities and accommodations so you can pick your favorites and save the rest for another trip. And to help get you to your destinations, turn to the road map on page 28. To order the guide, call 800-548-4386.
FEATURES
By Barbara Shea and Barbara Shea,Newsday | April 16, 1995
Back in 1637, Connecticut's Pequot Indians were virtually annihilated by the local Colonists around Mystic in a massacre that lasted just one hour.It took the patient Pequots more than three centuries to rebound, but there's little argument in the area today that the tribe now holds all the cards.Most tourists quickly realize this too, because they usually learn about the so-called Pequot Wars as I did: in the tiny museum outside the high-stakes poker room in Foxwoods Resort Casino -- the tribe's multimillion-dollar enterprise that is by far the Nutmeg State's No. 1 tourist attraction.
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