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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 15, 2003
If you want to see an interminable message movie - the message is, revenge does not pay - Mystic River is for you. The director, Clint Eastwood, doesn't want anyone to miss the importance of his theme: He spells it out in block letters, repeatedly, then drops it on the audience's head. He stages scenes as if he were a schoolteacher going through his lessons with a pointer; early on he puts the corpse of a 19-year-old girl inside a circle, as if to say "X marks the spot." The score he wrote for the movie includes a mournful heavenly choir courtesy of the Tanglewood Festival Chorus.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
The 172-year-old whaler Charles W. Morgan, the nation's oldest surviving merchant vessel, will emerge Sunday from an almost five-year, multimillion-dollar restoration effort headed by a former Marylander. Like a proud papa, Quentin Snediker, shipyard director at historic Mystic Seaport in Connecticut where the work was completed, will no doubt be beaming as the National Historic Landmark is lowered into the Mystic River in a public ceremony on the anniversary of its original launch in New Bedford, Mass., in 1841.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2003
This week's question: What are you most looking forward to doing before the holidays? Cooking Having parties Nothing Relaxing Shopping Taking a vacation There's nothing to look forward to until January Last week's question Which movie do you think will fare best at the Oscars? 5.3 percent Cold Mountain (2 votes) 0 percent The Human Stain (0 votes) 0 percent The Last Samurai (0 votes) 7.9 percent Master and Commander (3 votes) 18.4 percent Mystic River (7 votes) 68.4 percent The Return of the King (26 votes)
FEATURES
By CHRIS HEWITT and CHRIS HEWITT,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 2, 2005
Even an actress as versatile as Laura Linney occasionally gets a "Don't call us, we'll call you." For instance, Linney is dying to reteam with Kinsey director Bill Condon on his next project. But it ain't happening. "I keep telling Bill to cast me in Dreamgirls, but he just isn't doing it," chuckles Linney, who would be a stretch for any role in the all-black musical about a group very much like the Supremes. But, in general, Linney says, "I haven't really found myself in a situation where I thought a role was forbidden to me. I have been asked to do some press things that were outside of my comfort zone, but, in terms of the acting stuff, I've never worried about that."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary McNamara and Mary McNamara,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 3, 2005
HOLLYWOOD -- A lot of actors say they choose their roles based on their gut or their heart or their need to "stretch creatively." A lot of actors say they don't think about the big paycheck or the marketing or the awards (even as their agents kill themselves procuring the big paycheck, the marketing and the awards). Kevin Bacon is more precise. He says he has taken three things off the list of his requirements for a role: the size of the role, the size of the movie and the size of the salary.
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By Chris Vognar and Chris Vognar,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 23, 2003
It wasn't long ago that Sean Penn publicly contemplated quitting acting, much as he quit smoking. Too much stress. Not enough fun. Too many mindless scripts crossing his desk. He got out of Los Angeles and moved his family north, to serene Marin County. Some thought he might actually walk away from performing and become a full-time director. Instead, he has taken his considerable combination of skill and raw power to a new plateau. His volcanic turn as a Boston tough guy mourning his slain daughter in Mystic River has left critics scrambling for Brando comparisons.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | January 26, 2004
Loosey goosey speeches - Mary Louise Parker thanking her newborn son for making her low-cut dress work - overdressed stars, prizes for The Lord of the Rings, Mystic River, Lost in Translation and Fox TV's 24 and HBO's Angels in America, for which Parker won her trophy. And a lot of plugs for the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. Welcome to the 2004 Golden Globes, the New Hampshire Primary of the movie awards season. Like New Hampshire, the Globes, awarded last night in Beverly Hills, Calif.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2003
BOSTON - In Mystic River, the celebrated new film directed by Clint Eastwood, the climactic scene occurs at the Black Emerald, a ramshackle bar on an abandoned waterfront. The dive - a place where thugs in leather jackets order whiskey by the bottle - exudes the grittiness of the working-class precincts of Boston that the film aspires to capture. Except for one thing: The bar doesn't actually exist. Unable to find a dive that suited their purposes, the filmmakers built the Black Emerald from scratch and then demolished it after filming, because a city inspector deemed it unfit to remain standing.
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 28, 2003
CANNES, France - Even Clint Eastwood had to shop around his latest movie, Mystic River, which earned a 15-minute ovation at its premiere at the recent Cannes Film Festival. One studio executive, for example, obsessed over a hand gesture that Kevin Bacon's Boston cop makes to a childhood friend, played by Sean Penn. Eastwood, who directed the film, eventually found partners in Warner Bros. and Village Roadshow. The $16 million drama about the shockwave effects of childhood trauma did not win any awards here, but it is poised to be an important release this fall.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 1, 2004
LOS ANGELES -- The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King journeyed to history last night, winning all 11 of the Academy Awards for which it was nominated -- a clean sweep that also ties the record for most wins by a single motion picture. So dominant was the film that other winners even joked about its performance. "We're so thankful that Lord of the Rings did not qualify in this category," producer Denise Robert said in accepting the best foreign language Oscar for Canada's The Barbarian Invasions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary McNamara and Mary McNamara,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 3, 2005
HOLLYWOOD -- A lot of actors say they choose their roles based on their gut or their heart or their need to "stretch creatively." A lot of actors say they don't think about the big paycheck or the marketing or the awards (even as their agents kill themselves procuring the big paycheck, the marketing and the awards). Kevin Bacon is more precise. He says he has taken three things off the list of his requirements for a role: the size of the role, the size of the movie and the size of the salary.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 1, 2004
Talent will out - that's the theme of the Oscars that will go down in history as The Lord of the Rings sweep. Despite its accumulating critical awards and guild honors and box-office returns, purveyors of inside-Hollywood dope kept insisting that older members didn't get the appeal of the trilogy and its intricate mythology. Gossip columnists and some handicappers warned that the long-held Academy prejudice against fantasy had never faded, and proponents of Mystic River campaigned on the tenet that their film had no special effects.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 1, 2004
LOS ANGELES -- The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King journeyed to history last night, winning all 11 of the Academy Awards for which it was nominated -- a clean sweep that also ties the record for most wins by a single motion picture. So dominant was the film that other winners even joked about its performance. "We're so thankful that Lord of the Rings did not qualify in this category," producer Denise Robert said in accepting the best foreign language Oscar for Canada's The Barbarian Invasions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 29, 2004
This year's Oscars offer hope that Hollywood may be crumbling -- in a good way, with barriers to creativity hurtling down as the tried-and-true models of class and commerce come apart. For most of Oscar history, overweight big-star epics, tasteful family-life tearjerkers, stultifying high-toned adaptations, and elephantine biopics or costume pictures have dominated nominees and winners. Last year signs of life emerged when Chicago, a sassy revival of the movie musical, and The Pianist, an unsparing depiction of World War II survival, split the major awards.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2004
Last week's question Which movie do you think will win the most Golden Globes? 40.4 percent The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (38 votes) 31.9 percent I don't care (30 votes) 9.6 percent Cold Mountain (9 votes) 5.3 percent Lost in Translation (5 votes) 5.3 percent Mystic River (5 votes) 5.3 percent What are the Golden Globes? (5 votes) 1.1 percent Monster (1 vote) 1.1 percent Other (1 vote) 94 total votes This week's question Who do you think will win Survivor: All-Stars?
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | January 26, 2004
Loosey goosey speeches - Mary Louise Parker thanking her newborn son for making her low-cut dress work - overdressed stars, prizes for The Lord of the Rings, Mystic River, Lost in Translation and Fox TV's 24 and HBO's Angels in America, for which Parker won her trophy. And a lot of plugs for the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. Welcome to the 2004 Golden Globes, the New Hampshire Primary of the movie awards season. Like New Hampshire, the Globes, awarded last night in Beverly Hills, Calif.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 1, 2004
Talent will out - that's the theme of the Oscars that will go down in history as The Lord of the Rings sweep. Despite its accumulating critical awards and guild honors and box-office returns, purveyors of inside-Hollywood dope kept insisting that older members didn't get the appeal of the trilogy and its intricate mythology. Gossip columnists and some handicappers warned that the long-held Academy prejudice against fantasy had never faded, and proponents of Mystic River campaigned on the tenet that their film had no special effects.
FEATURES
By Chris Vognar and Chris Vognar,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 23, 2003
It wasn't long ago that Sean Penn publicly contemplated quitting acting, much as he quit smoking. Too much stress. Not enough fun. Too many mindless scripts crossing his desk. He got out of Los Angeles and moved his family north, to serene Marin County. Some thought he might actually walk away from performing and become a full-time director. Instead, he has taken his considerable combination of skill and raw power to a new plateau. His volcanic turn as a Boston tough guy mourning his slain daughter in Mystic River has left critics scrambling for Brando comparisons.
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