Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMystery Writers
IN THE NEWS

Mystery Writers

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By dave rosenthal and nancy Johnston and dave rosenthal and nancy Johnston,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com and nancy.johnston@baltsun.com | October 5, 2008
If you're a mystery fan, Baltimore is the place to be this week. Beginning Thursday, the international Bouchercon conference, Charmed to Death, will bring about 1,500 mystery writers and mystery lovers here for a four-day celebration of the genre. Among them: Lawrence Block, whose works span more than five decades, and Baltimore's own Laura Lippman. Lippman, whose new short-story collection, Hardly Knew Her, just hit stores, will be the conference's American guest of honor. She's also in the running for two Anthony awards: best novel for What the Dead Know and best short story for "Hardly Knew Her."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2013
For acclaimed mystery novelist Martha Grimes, the witches' caldron that nearly proved her undoing didn't contain the usual eye of newt and toe of frog. Instead, it held 10 parts gin or sometimes vodka, a splash of vermouth, lemon peel, olive and onion. Grimes was an alcoholic so high-functioning that the people who knew her best never suspected that dry martinis were her intoxicant of choice. Since 1981, the writer, now 82, has published at least one book each year, including 22 of the best-selling Richard Jury mysteries.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | December 22, 1991
For some people, cooking is murder.From the leg of lamb used as a murder weapon to the traces of arsenic in the elderberry wine, food has often played a role in literary mayhem. So when a group of mystery writers collaborates on a cookbook, you'd better believe their prose has little in common with Betty Crocker's.Poring through "Cooking With Malice Domestic," a cookbook devised by Jean and Ron McMillen, owners of Mystery Bookshop: Bethesda, readers will come across such evocative directions as "beat to death," "flay and dismember half a small chicken" and "crack those eggs -- show no mercy."
NEWS
By Tribune Newspapers | February 16, 2010
DICK FRANCIS , 89 Best-selling British mystery writer Dick Francis, a champion steeplechase jockey who became a best-selling British mystery writer, died of natural causes Sunday at his home in the Cayman Islands. He wrote 42 novels, many featuring racing as a theme, after retiring from racing in 1957. "I haven't suffered the same injuries as my characters, but I have suffered pain and I know it," he told the Los Angeles Times during a visit to Southern California in 1981.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | March 8, 1993
Washington--Even scrambled eggs have a certain flair when you're Breakfasting With the Baroness. The morning coffee goes down strong and flavorful, and wheat toast takes on an almost palpable je ne sais quoi."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 14, 2000
What does a "night of mystery" suggest to you? A Gothic mansion creaking and groaning in eerie moonlight as a lone, menacing figure approaches from across the moors? A midnight search for clues to a grisly murder along a chilly, fog-shrouded river? How about a night at the bookstore? At 7:30 this evening, at Barnes and Noble Booksellers in Annapolis Harbour Center, a "Night of Mystery," featuring five female Maryland mystery writers, will be presented. The panelists are Sujata Massey, Chassis West, Judy Fitzwater, Barbara Lee and Marcia Talley, prolific, successful authors with multiple published works in the genre.
NEWS
January 3, 2009
DONALD WESTLAKE, 75 Mystery writer Donald Westlake, a prolific author considered one of the most successful and versatile mystery writers in the United States, died on New Year's Eve after suffering an apparent heart attack while vacationing in Mexico, his wife, Abigail, told The New York Times. In a lengthy career that spanned a half-century, Mr. Westlake won three Edgar Awards, an Academy Award nomination for his screenplay The Grifters and the title of Grand Master from the Mystery Writers of America in 1993.
FEATURES
May 2, 1998
Laura Lippman, a Sun features writer, has won a 1998 Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America for her Baltimore-based 1997 mystery, "Charm City."Lippman's was among more than a dozen awards handed out Thursday evening by the mystery writers group, a 53-year-old organization dedicated to promoting the mystery as a literary genre. The Edgar is named for mystery pioneer Edgar Allan Poe. Her book "Charm City" (Avon), featuring a Baltimore newspaper reporter-turned-sleuth, was named best paperback original of 1997.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | January 23, 2000
"The Oxford Companion to Crime & Mystery Writing" edited by Rosemary Herbert (Oxford University Press, 535 pages, $49.95) From the excellent utilitarian introduction by Rosemary Herbert to the last entry, a succinct biography of Israel Zangwill (1864-1926), this is a splendid reader's crutch for the mystery-afflicted. Its largest staple is concise biographical entries on mystery writers and classic figures in the genre's canon. But there are often charming, sometimes challenging entries on abstractions ("heroism," "suspicion")
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2009
Former screenwriters Michael Sutton and Anthony Fingleton created Over My Dead Body in 1984 as a play to salute classic mystery writers like Arthur Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie. Their play features a trio of once-famous mystery writers whose elegant works have been replaced by sleazy, too-realistic current bestsellers. These writer-friends are the founders of a club for mystery writers - the Murder League in London, where they meet and decide to craft and commit the perfect murder to restore the mystery novel's rightful importance (despite the probability that they will be caught)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly , Jacques.Kelly@baltsun.com | December 5, 2009
A Maryland murder mystery writer came to mind the other afternoon as darkness was coming over Lafayette Avenue in Bolton Hill. It was an atmospheric old Baltimore scene on a dreary early December day: worn granite curbs, moss in the sidewalk cracks, wet brick on the 1870s rowhouses. I glanced inside some windows and spotted some Hepplewhite chairs. A few minutes later, I passed the clock tower at Mount Royal Station. It seemed to say, "It's getting on to 5: Go home and read a good book."
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2009
Former screenwriters Michael Sutton and Anthony Fingleton created Over My Dead Body in 1984 as a play to salute classic mystery writers like Arthur Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie. Their play features a trio of once-famous mystery writers whose elegant works have been replaced by sleazy, too-realistic current bestsellers. These writer-friends are the founders of a club for mystery writers - the Murder League in London, where they meet and decide to craft and commit the perfect murder to restore the mystery novel's rightful importance (despite the probability that they will be caught)
NEWS
January 3, 2009
DONALD WESTLAKE, 75 Mystery writer Donald Westlake, a prolific author considered one of the most successful and versatile mystery writers in the United States, died on New Year's Eve after suffering an apparent heart attack while vacationing in Mexico, his wife, Abigail, told The New York Times. In a lengthy career that spanned a half-century, Mr. Westlake won three Edgar Awards, an Academy Award nomination for his screenplay The Grifters and the title of Grand Master from the Mystery Writers of America in 1993.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2008
OTHER PICKS Mystery Writers The Anthony Boucher Memorial Mystery Convention, or Bouchercon, offers a place for mystery writers and fans to gather. Hundreds of writers, including local writer and guest of honor Laura Lippman, Lawrence Block, Peter Robinson, Carolyn Hart and Andrew Gross, will be in attendance. There will be whodunit workshops and awards. The convention starts today and runs through Sunday at the Sheraton Baltimore City Center Hotel, 101 W. Fayette St. Go to charmedtodeath.
ENTERTAINMENT
By dave rosenthal and nancy Johnston and dave rosenthal and nancy Johnston,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com and nancy.johnston@baltsun.com | October 5, 2008
If you're a mystery fan, Baltimore is the place to be this week. Beginning Thursday, the international Bouchercon conference, Charmed to Death, will bring about 1,500 mystery writers and mystery lovers here for a four-day celebration of the genre. Among them: Lawrence Block, whose works span more than five decades, and Baltimore's own Laura Lippman. Lippman, whose new short-story collection, Hardly Knew Her, just hit stores, will be the conference's American guest of honor. She's also in the running for two Anthony awards: best novel for What the Dead Know and best short story for "Hardly Knew Her."
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2004
The most appealing thing about mysteries is how transporting they can be. The clues are intriguing to discern and the ending is fun to guess. But what I love best about mysteries is their sense of place. In author Tony Hillerman's Navajo mysteries, it is the arid desert of Arizona and New Mexico, the color of the mountains and the power of the changing weather. In the English mysteries of Martha Grimes, it is the bleak weather of England as seen through the leaded-glass windows of the cozy neighborhood pub. And in the gruesome murder mysteries of Patricia Cornwell, it is the aromatic Italian kitchen of coroner Kay Scarpetta.
NEWS
By Tribune Newspapers | February 16, 2010
DICK FRANCIS , 89 Best-selling British mystery writer Dick Francis, a champion steeplechase jockey who became a best-selling British mystery writer, died of natural causes Sunday at his home in the Cayman Islands. He wrote 42 novels, many featuring racing as a theme, after retiring from racing in 1957. "I haven't suffered the same injuries as my characters, but I have suffered pain and I know it," he told the Los Angeles Times during a visit to Southern California in 1981.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2008
OTHER PICKS Mystery Writers The Anthony Boucher Memorial Mystery Convention, or Bouchercon, offers a place for mystery writers and fans to gather. Hundreds of writers, including local writer and guest of honor Laura Lippman, Lawrence Block, Peter Robinson, Carolyn Hart and Andrew Gross, will be in attendance. There will be whodunit workshops and awards. The convention starts today and runs through Sunday at the Sheraton Baltimore City Center Hotel, 101 W. Fayette St. Go to charmedtodeath.
NEWS
By Kimbra Cutlip and Kimbra Cutlip,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 2002
NOW THAT we've finally had some chilly weather, people are starting to come indoors to cuddle up on the couch with a cup of latte and a cozy book. For mystery fans, plenty of tales of murder and mayhem are set right in our back yard. And some of them have made it to the bookshelves with the help of Annapolis Mystery Writers, a group of nine local writers who meet once a month to hone their craft. Their stories feature a variety of characters and settings, but many of them take place around town.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.