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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | September 16, 2001
Once again, I beg your indulgence. It falls to me to choose all books to be reviewed on the pages of this newspaper, and to decide who will review them. Books written by colleagues at The Sun are a particular challenge. These I chose to do myself. Whether you believe my clear-minded objectivity -- well, it's up to you. I have just finished reading, with delight, In a Strange City, by Laura Lippman (Morrow, 310 pages, $24) and Journeys to the Heart of Baltimore, by Michael Olesker (Johns Hopkins, 346 pages, $22.50)
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | January 9, 2013
By now, 60 long years after Agatha Christie's “The Mousetrap” opened in London, the whodunit is more of a fixture than a stage show. It apparently cannot ever be stopped on that side of The Pond, where it has surpassed the 25,000th performance mark and still holds firmly onto the record as the world's longest-running play. On our shores, the work never became such an institution, but it still continues to attract attention now and then, particularly from community theater groups.
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NEWS
By SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE QUEEN BESS: DAREDEVIL AVIATOR Doris L. Rich Smithsonian Institution Press 153 pages. $ 18.95 and SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE QUEEN BESS: DAREDEVIL AVIATOR Doris L. Rich Smithsonian Institution Press 153 pages. $ 18.95,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 26, 1993
TWICE IN A BLUE MOON Patricia Moyes Henry Holt 192 pages. $19.95. Patricia Moyes' series featuring Scotland Yard Superintendent Henry Tibbett and his wife, Emmy, is one of the longest-running in mystery fiction -- the first installment, "Dead Men Don't Ski," was published in 1959. But "Twice in a Blue Moon," Ms. Moyes' long-awaited new novel, is a rather bland affair, not the perfect puzzler fans have come to expect from this author.Instead of using her usual third-person voice, Ms. Moyes has innkeeper Susan Gardiner narrate the story.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
By now, 60 long years after Agatha Christie's “The Mousetrap” opened in London, the whodunit is more of a fixture than a stage show. It apparently cannot ever be stopped on that side of The Pond, where it has surpassed the 25,000th performance mark and still holds firmly onto the record as the world's longest-running play. On our shores, the work never became such an institution, but it still continues to attract attention now and then, particularly from community theater groups.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | January 9, 2013
By now, 60 long years after Agatha Christie's “The Mousetrap” opened in London, the whodunit is more of a fixture than a stage show. It apparently cannot ever be stopped on that side of The Pond, where it has surpassed the 25,000th performance mark and still holds firmly onto the record as the world's longest-running play. On our shores, the work never became such an institution, but it still continues to attract attention now and then, particularly from community theater groups.
NEWS
By Jonathan Alter | March 22, 1994
AFTER four months of steady stories, we still have no idea whether Whitewater is cancer or hemorrhoids.Either way, the dynamics of the press coverage are perfectly predictable. Regardless of the scale of wrongdoing, the arc of scandal moves from frenzy to boredom and back again.The media child naps, stirs, races around the room, loses attention, rests, then wakes in full cry. You can almost set your watch by it. The pattern goes like this:First comes the journalistic prophet, in this case Jeff Gerth of the New York Times, who in March 1992 broke the story of the Whitewater investment and the Clintons' connection to the owner of a failed savings and loan.
NEWS
By REBECCA LOGAN and REBECCA LOGAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 7, 2006
When life gets a little stressful, Cecilia Neumann reaches for a good mystery. "Reading is how I get away from it all," Neumann said. "And I don't want a cheap romance novel, either. Give me some bodies." The Bel Air widow is partial to British authors because their crime scenes "are not so sloppy." Still, a mystery is a mystery, and Neumann will take them as they come. So she recently joined members of a widows and divorcees support group at a murder mystery show at the Baker House, a bed and breakfast in Aberdeen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
By now, 60 long years after Agatha Christie's “The Mousetrap” opened in London, the whodunit is more of a fixture than a stage show. It apparently cannot ever be stopped on that side of The Pond, where it has surpassed the 25,000th performance mark and still holds firmly onto the record as the world's longest-running play. On our shores, the work never became such an institution, but it still continues to attract attention now and then, particularly from community theater groups.
NEWS
By Susanne Trowbridge | August 18, 1991
It's one of the longest-running debates in the world of mystery fiction -- which is the superior subgenre, cozy "traditional" mysteries or hard-boiled? It's rare indeed to find a fan who enjoys reading both; while cozy lovers devour novels by Charlotte MacLeod, Patricia Moyes, Simon Brett and Agatha Christie, hard-boiled addicts turn to Ross Macdonald, Sara Paretsky, Andrew Vachss and Raymond Chandler.Stepping into the fray is Carolyn G. Hart, whose latest book, "The Christie Caper" (Bantam, 336 pages, $18)
FEATURES
By Elsbeth Bothe and Elsbeth Bothe,Special to the sun | May 31, 1998
A review of summer fiction in Sunday's Arts & Society section referred incorrectly to an independent Baltimore bookstore that specializes in mystery titles. Its name is Mystery Loves Company.The Sun regrets the errors.Death seems to provide the minds of the Anglo-Saxon race with a greater fund of amusement than any other single subject," said English mystery writer Dorothy Sayers. She was mistaken only in confining the remark to those of British heritage. The entertaining purveyors of fictitious death, variously called crime novel, thriller, detective or murder mystery, now comprise the major fund of fun-reading in the whole world.
NEWS
By REBECCA LOGAN and REBECCA LOGAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 7, 2006
When life gets a little stressful, Cecilia Neumann reaches for a good mystery. "Reading is how I get away from it all," Neumann said. "And I don't want a cheap romance novel, either. Give me some bodies." The Bel Air widow is partial to British authors because their crime scenes "are not so sloppy." Still, a mystery is a mystery, and Neumann will take them as they come. So she recently joined members of a widows and divorcees support group at a murder mystery show at the Baker House, a bed and breakfast in Aberdeen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | September 16, 2001
Once again, I beg your indulgence. It falls to me to choose all books to be reviewed on the pages of this newspaper, and to decide who will review them. Books written by colleagues at The Sun are a particular challenge. These I chose to do myself. Whether you believe my clear-minded objectivity -- well, it's up to you. I have just finished reading, with delight, In a Strange City, by Laura Lippman (Morrow, 310 pages, $24) and Journeys to the Heart of Baltimore, by Michael Olesker (Johns Hopkins, 346 pages, $22.50)
FEATURES
By Elsbeth Bothe and Elsbeth Bothe,Special to the sun | May 31, 1998
A review of summer fiction in Sunday's Arts & Society section referred incorrectly to an independent Baltimore bookstore that specializes in mystery titles. Its name is Mystery Loves Company.The Sun regrets the errors.Death seems to provide the minds of the Anglo-Saxon race with a greater fund of amusement than any other single subject," said English mystery writer Dorothy Sayers. She was mistaken only in confining the remark to those of British heritage. The entertaining purveyors of fictitious death, variously called crime novel, thriller, detective or murder mystery, now comprise the major fund of fun-reading in the whole world.
NEWS
By Jonathan Alter | March 22, 1994
AFTER four months of steady stories, we still have no idea whether Whitewater is cancer or hemorrhoids.Either way, the dynamics of the press coverage are perfectly predictable. Regardless of the scale of wrongdoing, the arc of scandal moves from frenzy to boredom and back again.The media child naps, stirs, races around the room, loses attention, rests, then wakes in full cry. You can almost set your watch by it. The pattern goes like this:First comes the journalistic prophet, in this case Jeff Gerth of the New York Times, who in March 1992 broke the story of the Whitewater investment and the Clintons' connection to the owner of a failed savings and loan.
NEWS
By SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE QUEEN BESS: DAREDEVIL AVIATOR Doris L. Rich Smithsonian Institution Press 153 pages. $ 18.95 and SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE QUEEN BESS: DAREDEVIL AVIATOR Doris L. Rich Smithsonian Institution Press 153 pages. $ 18.95,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 26, 1993
TWICE IN A BLUE MOON Patricia Moyes Henry Holt 192 pages. $19.95. Patricia Moyes' series featuring Scotland Yard Superintendent Henry Tibbett and his wife, Emmy, is one of the longest-running in mystery fiction -- the first installment, "Dead Men Don't Ski," was published in 1959. But "Twice in a Blue Moon," Ms. Moyes' long-awaited new novel, is a rather bland affair, not the perfect puzzler fans have come to expect from this author.Instead of using her usual third-person voice, Ms. Moyes has innkeeper Susan Gardiner narrate the story.
NEWS
By Susanne Trowbridge | August 18, 1991
It's one of the longest-running debates in the world of mystery fiction -- which is the superior subgenre, cozy "traditional" mysteries or hard-boiled? It's rare indeed to find a fan who enjoys reading both; while cozy lovers devour novels by Charlotte MacLeod, Patricia Moyes, Simon Brett and Agatha Christie, hard-boiled addicts turn to Ross Macdonald, Sara Paretsky, Andrew Vachss and Raymond Chandler.Stepping into the fray is Carolyn G. Hart, whose latest book, "The Christie Caper" (Bantam, 336 pages, $18)
FEATURES
By Sun staff | October 6, 1998
Sun staff writer Laura Lippman has been named winner of a 1998 Shamus Award for mystery fiction.Lippman, who has published three Baltimore-based mysteries over the past two years, received the annual award from the Private Eye Writers of America at this past weekend's Bouchercon World Mystery Convention in Philadelphia.Lippman was nominated for two Shamus awards -- best first novel, for "Baltimore Blues," and best paperback original, for "Charm City," both from Avon. She won for "Charm City," which earlier this year won the Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America for best paperback original.
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