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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2010
There's new life in Back River — though not quite what folks had been hoping for. The eastern Baltimore County waterway, long degraded by sewage and development, has been humming the past few summers with hordes of midges, gnat-like insects that swarm over the water and along the shoreline. They don't bite, though they look like mosquitoes. But their mating swarms are bedeviling waterfront residents, boaters and marina operators because the bugs are drawn to lights and light-colored objects.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Allan Vought and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Durbar II has been shocking people for more than a century. When the 3-year-old, French-bred, American-owned Thoroughbred won England's prestigious Epsom Derby in 1914, despite going off as a 20-1 long shot, the genteel world of English horse-racing was turned upside-down. When he made it out of war-torn Paris in the early days of World War I, at a time when many horses were being pressed into military service, he again bucked the odds. And today, when people hear that this famed Thoroughbred is buried in Bel Air, on the grounds of Harford Community College - well, it's safe to say that's news to most Harford County residents.
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NEWS
June 28, 2012
Either you or Rep. C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger aren't telling the whole story about his decision leave the House Armed Services Committee, because the explanation given doesn't make any sense ("Ruppersberger steps down from Armed Services panel," June 27). Neither he nor your reporter answers the basic question: Why is a senior member of an important congressional committee stepping aside to make way for an incoming freshman? It should be the other way around. Sorry, but I must be missing something here.
HEALTH
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The tiny brass ring bearing the initials "CC" presents a mystery: Did it belong to Charles Calvert, the third Baron Baltimore? And can the St. Mary's College of Maryland archaeologists who unearthed it ever prove its origins? The archaeologists discovered the ring this summer at a dig at a Charles County site that was a refuge for Piscataway Indians who were pushed from their homelands by other tribes and the arrival of European settlers in the 1600s. The small ring, perhaps designed to be worn on a pinkie finger, might have been a signet ring used to seal documents, said Julia King, the St. Mary's professor who oversaw the dig. King believes the ring might have been used by a representative of Charles Calvert to conduct diplomatic relations with the Piscataway tribe.
NEWS
October 7, 2013
For more than a week I've watched the white U.S. Navy blimp circling over Baltimore ( "Baltimore blimp not affected by federal government shutdown," Oct. 3). But instead of hanging out on social media on the subject, I've contacted the mayor's office, the city council president and even the police. Apparently, no city officials were told about this beforehand. To me, that's a lapse in protocol. This lighter-than-air vehicle has been funded by contract, and therefore it's immune from the government shutdown.
EXPLORE
By Diane Pajak | September 6, 2012
Local author Sherban Young pens what he calls “mystery capers.” The 37-year-old Ellicott City resident got interested in solving puzzles and mysteries through CD-ROM interactive adventure games while at Loyola University, where he majored in English literature. Though in partnership with his father in a Columbia financial planning firm, Young has disciplined himself to devote time each morning to writing his mystery capers. “I love to solve puzzles,” he said, adding that his style of mystery writing enables “readers to enjoy themselves ... my writing is to be entertaining and intriguing.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
Bowie Community Theatre's presentation of "Dark Passages" marks the culmination of the company's 47th season. Under the guidance of President John Nunemaker, the lineup for this season has been a departure from past years in its concentration on largely undiscovered plays. "Dark Passages," a work by mother and daughter playwriting team Jan Henson Dow and Shannon Michal Dow, with Robert Schroeder, became available for production in 2012. Bowie's production has much to recommend it for adventurous theatergoers and mystery fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick,
The Baltimore Sun
| April 24, 2013
Beginning this Saturday, the Tremont Grand Historic Venue will host a murder mystery dinner on the last Saturday of every month. The interactive mysteries will be staged by Do or Die Mysteries, which has been producing murder mystery events for the past 20 years in the Baltimore-Washington area. The kick-off production is titled Art of Murder , and the story line will change at each event. Reservations are required. Admission includes dinner, the show and non-alcoholic beverages.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | October 15, 2010
Monica Marcum sat in the office of the Baltimore City Historical Society and held a document she discovered among her late father's papers. It was a check dated July 6, 1874, for $62.81 for plumbing materials at the "new City Hall. " She was giving the canceled check to the historical group because she thought it deserved a proper home. She wondered how her father came into possession of this financial document for Baltimore's City Hall, which was under construction during this period and opened for business in 1875.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 29, 2010
Well, that didn't take long. Less than 24 hours after The Baltimore Sun ran a story about the Babe Ruth Birthplace and Museum's year-long search for the owner of a rare and valuable baseball card, the owner has surfaced. A man identifying himself as Glenn Davis of Bethany Beach, Del., contacted the museum – and the newspaper -- to say he was the owner of the 1914 Baltimore News Babe Ruth rookie card. It's one of the most valuable cards on the market, with an estimated value of $500,000.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2014
William Smith's disease has grim milestones. At 2, the Gambrills triplet known as Mick couldn't walk or talk as well as his siblings. In kindergarten, he started losing language and motor skills. At 12, he needed a wheelchair and a feeding tube. Doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital dedicated to treating his symptoms said he had an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease. But a new test may provide something the family has long sought: a name. "The idea that there is something out there that can tell you [what's wrong]
NEWS
By Andy Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Decades of careful restoration and study have revealed a lot about the flag that flew over Fort McHenry after its defenders fought off a naval attack during the War of 1812: the swatches taken as mementos of the pivotal battle, the areas worn by time, perhaps even sections damaged by British mortar fire. But a gaping hole at the center of the original Star-Spangled Banner presents a question that no one has been able to answer: What happened to the missing star? "It's a major mystery," said Lonn Taylor, a retired historian who helped the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History reconstruct the story of the flag in the century after it left the fort and before it entered the museum's collection.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2014
Former Ravens safety Ed Reed stood in the middle of a makeshift softball diamond on a field he knows well and waved his arms as fans chanted his name. Reed, who played 11 seasons with the Ravens, has long said that Baltimore will always feel like home, even after his expected Hall of Fame playing career is over. When that will be, however, remains very much a mystery. Speaking at former teammate Lardarius Webb's charity softball game Sunday at M&T Bank Stadium, Reed said that he is preparing to play in the 2014 season.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 15, 2014
The mysterious die-off of honey bees continues, as beekepers across the nation lost more than one in three of their colonies since last spring, researchers reported Thursday.  The losses in Maryland were even more extreme, where nearly half were lost, according to the state's chief apiary inspector. The national survey of beekeepers found that they lost one in five honey bee colonies over the winter, fewer than the winter before. But they reported seeing substantial die-off in summer as well, pushing their year-round losses to more than a third.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 29, 2014
The fish kill affecting Baltimore Harbor and the Patapsco River appears to be over, according to a spokesman for the Maryland Department of the Environment . But state biologists are still unclear why an estimated 7,000 fish turned belly up so early in the year. Biologists went back out on Tuesday to check from the mouth of the river up to Fells Point and Fort McHenry, said Jay Apperson, MDE's deputy communications director.  While biologists revised upwards their original estimate that maybe 1,000 fish had died Monday, they did not see any newly dead or dying fish, he said.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
No suspense remains for Navy's hopes of qualifying for its first NCAA tournament since 2009. The team must win three games in the Patriot League tournament, beginning with Tuesday's quarterfinal at Lehigh. With a 4-8 record, the Midshipmen have no shot at an at-large bid, but coach Rick Sowell insisted that there is no talk about anything beyond Tuesday's game. “Right now, it's Lehigh,” he said Monday afternoon. “You win, you advance. You lose, you go home. At this point, any conversation about winning three games, that just hasn't come up. That's not our focus at this point in time.
NEWS
By Thomas Belton | June 16, 2002
HADDONFIELD, N.J. - Sometimes I think of myself as threads of my father, angles of light that come forward in time to illuminate the years since he passed away. On his famous marathon walks through the city, he taught me to read by mouthing words off overhead signs, window advertisements and billboards that plastered construction sites. Six-foot-four with a mop of orange hair, he'd act like a kid sometimes. He loved to gawk at skyscraper excavations, which opened up like the Grand Canyon as gargantuan machines rumbled down earthen ramps and tiny men rode elephantine tractors and giraffe-like cranes to raise steel scaffolding high into the noonday sun. Dad loved to share the mysteries of the world with us as kids, as if there were great secrets hiding behind every corner.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
Michael Phelps continued his global mystery tour this week with a trip to Sao Paulo, Brazil, to film his newest Subway commercial with soccer legend Pele. The mystery, of course, is whether Phelps will swim for more gold medals when Brazil hosts the 2016 Olympics. Phelps coyly evaded the speculation again in Sao Paulo, where he joked to a French news agency that his potential comeback is "the million-dollar question. " Phelps sent a strong signal that he's considering a comeback when he rejoined the international drug testing pool , meaning he could compete in 2014 if he chooses.
NEWS
March 21, 2014
The number of jobs in Maryland decreased by 9,800 in January. The statewide unemployment rate remains high at around 6 percent (compared to 3.6 percent at the start of 2008), and projected state tax revenues have recently been adjusted downward by $238 million. Balancing next year's budget has required some "creative" accounting in Annapolis, including dipping into money that was supposed to be set aside for state pensions. Under those circumstances, a tax break might even be in order, but surely lawmakers would want it focused on creating new jobs, particularly for communities like Baltimore or the lower Eastern Shore where the unemployment rates still hover near the double-digit mark.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
Bowie Community Theatre's presentation of "Dark Passages" marks the culmination of the company's 47th season. Under the guidance of President John Nunemaker, the lineup for this season has been a departure from past years in its concentration on largely undiscovered plays. "Dark Passages," a work by mother and daughter playwriting team Jan Henson Dow and Shannon Michal Dow, with Robert Schroeder, became available for production in 2012. Bowie's production has much to recommend it for adventurous theatergoers and mystery fans.
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