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By Genevieve Matanoski and Genevieve Matanoski,Medical Tribune News Service | March 1, 1994
Multiple sclerosis is a debilitating and tragic disease that attacks young adults. Women are twice as likely as men to develop MS, the most common cause of non-traumatic disability of young adults in the United States. About 300,000 Americans have this disease, which causes its victims to lose muscular function -- sometimes slowly, sometimes swiftly.Doctors know very little about what causes MS, and there is no cure. A new therapy called Betaseron has recently been introduced to the market, but supplies are very limited.
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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Sometimes, late at night, Glennae Williams is startled awake by a crash. "Are you ok, Ma?" she calls to her mother. Her mother, DaVeeda White, has fallen again. She gets up to use the bathroom and her legs collapse, just as they have been collapsing since Glennae was a little girl. "I'm on the floor," White calls back. She knows her daughter will come. These are not the kinds of nights one associates with the last exhausted, exuberant, anxious weeks of college. Williams stays up late cramming for finals and fretting about grades, then rushes off to work in the morning.
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NEWS
By Newsday | February 26, 1993
The first tentative signs of promise in treating multiple sclerosis with simple oral doses of a common protein have been reported by a research team in Boston.The treatment, aimed at stopping the patients' immune-system cells from attacking their nerve cells, was not dramatically effective, but was encouraging enough to warrant a bigger, more extensive study, the researchers said yesterday. The larger study, involving more than 200 patients, is planned to start this year.The hints of success suggest this approach, called oral tolerization, may eventually be useful in early treatment of other auto-immune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes and an eye disease called uveitis, said neuroimmunologist Howard Weiner.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2004
SAN DIEGO -- Scientists here said yesterday that they had used human stem cells to repair the damaged spinal cords of paralyzed rats and enable them to walk, an important advance that could result in human trials by 2006. This was the first time stem cells have been successfully used to treat such spinal cord injuries, and some scientists saw the results as a powerful rebuttal to the Bush administration view that stem cell research is a long way from offering human medical treatments. The research findings were announced at the annual conference of the Society for Neuroscience.
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By Jean Marbella | January 26, 1993
Adrenoleukodystrophy, or ALD, is a disorder resulting from an abnormal gene passed from mother to son. This genetic mutation causes substances called very long chain fatty acids to accumulate. That, in turn, damages the myelin, the material that coats nerve fibers in the brain much like the insulating material that protects telephone wire. The myelin damage -- which to date is irreversible -- is what causes the neurological system to break down.While there are various forms of ALD, the most prevalent is the childhood cerebral form portrayed in "Lorenzo's Oil."
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By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Medical Tribune News Service | November 22, 1994
Researchers have reported on two experimental drugs in recent weeks that represent potential major advances in treating multiple sclerosis.The reports follow on the heels of Food and Drug Administration approval last year of Betaseron, the first drug to show progress against the course of the disease.The reports should give hope to the estimated 300,000 people in the United States who suffer from MS -- the leading cause of non-traumatic disability among people between the ages of 15 and 45. Women should be especially heartened, because of the 10,000 cases diagnosed yearly, women represent twice as many as men.The two experimental drugs are copolymer-1 and interferon beta-1a.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | January 31, 1992
Stuck in a Baltimore County hospital bed just after New Year's while recovering from surgery, Carole Downing was dismayed to find that her inactivity was making her multiple sclerosis symptoms worse.The lower-body weakness and numbness she had been battling since 1984 threatened to leave her wheelchair-bound."She called and said, 'Get me out of here,' " said Dr. Kenneth P. Johnson, neurology chairman at the University of Maryland Medical System.Dr. Johnson did, and Ms. Downing, 48, of Pikesville, became the first patient at University's new multiple sclerosis rehabilitation unit at the Montebello Rehabilitation Hospital in northeast Baltimore.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 28, 2004
JUDI BARTNICKI, 53, had been an artist all her life. Then multiple sclerosis struck four years ago, doing its worst damage in her left hand, the one she needs for painting and drawing. "I kept trying to paint and I would drop everything," she said. Finally, her fiance, David Richardson, figured out a way to tape her paintbrush to her left hand. Painting is still painful, the Georgetown resident said, "but I am so happy to be able to do it. I am doing my best work." MS is a nasty, chronic disease in which the immune system attacks the myelin sheath that insulates nerves.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2004
SAN DIEGO -- Scientists here said yesterday that they had used human stem cells to repair the damaged spinal cords of paralyzed rats and enable them to walk, an important advance that could result in human trials by 2006. This was the first time stem cells have been successfully used to treat such spinal cord injuries, and some scientists saw the results as a powerful rebuttal to the Bush administration view that stem cell research is a long way from offering human medical treatments. The research findings were announced at the annual conference of the Society for Neuroscience.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Sometimes, late at night, Glennae Williams is startled awake by a crash. "Are you ok, Ma?" she calls to her mother. Her mother, DaVeeda White, has fallen again. She gets up to use the bathroom and her legs collapse, just as they have been collapsing since Glennae was a little girl. "I'm on the floor," White calls back. She knows her daughter will come. These are not the kinds of nights one associates with the last exhausted, exuberant, anxious weeks of college. Williams stays up late cramming for finals and fretting about grades, then rushes off to work in the morning.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 28, 2004
JUDI BARTNICKI, 53, had been an artist all her life. Then multiple sclerosis struck four years ago, doing its worst damage in her left hand, the one she needs for painting and drawing. "I kept trying to paint and I would drop everything," she said. Finally, her fiance, David Richardson, figured out a way to tape her paintbrush to her left hand. Painting is still painful, the Georgetown resident said, "but I am so happy to be able to do it. I am doing my best work." MS is a nasty, chronic disease in which the immune system attacks the myelin sheath that insulates nerves.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Medical Tribune News Service | November 22, 1994
Researchers have reported on two experimental drugs in recent weeks that represent potential major advances in treating multiple sclerosis.The reports follow on the heels of Food and Drug Administration approval last year of Betaseron, the first drug to show progress against the course of the disease.The reports should give hope to the estimated 300,000 people in the United States who suffer from MS -- the leading cause of non-traumatic disability among people between the ages of 15 and 45. Women should be especially heartened, because of the 10,000 cases diagnosed yearly, women represent twice as many as men.The two experimental drugs are copolymer-1 and interferon beta-1a.
FEATURES
By Genevieve Matanoski and Genevieve Matanoski,Medical Tribune News Service | March 1, 1994
Multiple sclerosis is a debilitating and tragic disease that attacks young adults. Women are twice as likely as men to develop MS, the most common cause of non-traumatic disability of young adults in the United States. About 300,000 Americans have this disease, which causes its victims to lose muscular function -- sometimes slowly, sometimes swiftly.Doctors know very little about what causes MS, and there is no cure. A new therapy called Betaseron has recently been introduced to the market, but supplies are very limited.
NEWS
By Newsday | February 26, 1993
The first tentative signs of promise in treating multiple sclerosis with simple oral doses of a common protein have been reported by a research team in Boston.The treatment, aimed at stopping the patients' immune-system cells from attacking their nerve cells, was not dramatically effective, but was encouraging enough to warrant a bigger, more extensive study, the researchers said yesterday. The larger study, involving more than 200 patients, is planned to start this year.The hints of success suggest this approach, called oral tolerization, may eventually be useful in early treatment of other auto-immune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes and an eye disease called uveitis, said neuroimmunologist Howard Weiner.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | January 26, 1993
Adrenoleukodystrophy, or ALD, is a disorder resulting from an abnormal gene passed from mother to son. This genetic mutation causes substances called very long chain fatty acids to accumulate. That, in turn, damages the myelin, the material that coats nerve fibers in the brain much like the insulating material that protects telephone wire. The myelin damage -- which to date is irreversible -- is what causes the neurological system to break down.While there are various forms of ALD, the most prevalent is the childhood cerebral form portrayed in "Lorenzo's Oil."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | January 31, 1992
Stuck in a Baltimore County hospital bed just after New Year's while recovering from surgery, Carole Downing was dismayed to find that her inactivity was making her multiple sclerosis symptoms worse.The lower-body weakness and numbness she had been battling since 1984 threatened to leave her wheelchair-bound."She called and said, 'Get me out of here,' " said Dr. Kenneth P. Johnson, neurology chairman at the University of Maryland Medical System.Dr. Johnson did, and Ms. Downing, 48, of Pikesville, became the first patient at University's new multiple sclerosis rehabilitation unit at the Montebello Rehabilitation Hospital in northeast Baltimore.
NEWS
July 11, 1997
In Monday's editions, the name of the family that established the Myelin Project to support research into the childhood disease adrenoleukodystrophy, or ALD, was misspelled.Augusto and Michaela Odone started the foundation. Their son, Lorenzo, has the nerve-wasting disease.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 7/11/97
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