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By Liz Lufkin and Liz Lufkin,San Francisco Chronicle | September 14, 1990
WHEN CARDIOLOGIST Dr. Dominick Curatola opened hi own office in Los Altos, Calif., a few months ago, he knew exactly what he wanted. Muzak.Not just any old Muzak, though. At 37, Curatola is a self-described "Dead Head" who grew up listening to the Grateful Dead, Motown and Grand Funk Railroad.Now Curatola has acts like Crosby, Stills & Nash, Santana, Rod Stewart and Janet Jackson beamed directly into his office, via a program on Muzak's direct satellite-broadcast system called Foreground Music One, nicknamed FM One.These are not syrupy string renditions of pop hits that used to have rock fans climbing the elevator walls back in the '60s.
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NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2009
I like music. But I tend to like the music I have picked out and purchased. What's more, I only like to listen to certain music at certain times. For example, I'll put on a particular group of artists when I'm feeling introspective, an entirely different group when I'm angry, another when I'm ecstatic and yet another when I'm nostalgic. As a result, all sorts of weird memories have attached themselves to songs in the repertoire of my life. To this day, I can't listen to Barry Manilow's "Mandy" without wanting to sit down and write a weepy, yearning love letter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | February 15, 2009
There was a news item in the paper the other day and, after reading it, I slumped in my chair and thought: That's it, now there can be no hope. The news was this: In a final, savage blow to the economy, Muzak, the company that makes elevator music, had filed for bankruptcy. Oh, you go ahead and worry about the Detroit automakers and the greedy banks and shyster mortgage lenders if you want. But if you can't make money producing gooey orchestral arrangements of pop songs anymore, then there is no money to be made, period, and the economy is doomed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | February 15, 2009
There was a news item in the paper the other day and, after reading it, I slumped in my chair and thought: That's it, now there can be no hope. The news was this: In a final, savage blow to the economy, Muzak, the company that makes elevator music, had filed for bankruptcy. Oh, you go ahead and worry about the Detroit automakers and the greedy banks and shyster mortgage lenders if you want. But if you can't make money producing gooey orchestral arrangements of pop songs anymore, then there is no money to be made, period, and the economy is doomed.
NEWS
By Larry Atkins | December 6, 2002
PHILADELPHIA -- Even though I'm only 41 years old, there are many signs that I'm starting to get old. My knees ache from arthritis and I limp like Walter Brennan after I try to play basketball. My eyesight and hearing are diminishing, as is my hairline. But perhaps one of the clearest signs that I'm getting older is that the music I grew up listening to has evolved into elevator music. During the past year, while eating at various fast-food restaurants, I've heard Muzak versions of Eric Clapton's "Let It Rain," Jethro Tull's "Bungle in the Jungle" and Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Evening Sun Staff | December 15, 1990
It's the season to be shopping and merry music fills the air. But did you know the melodies you hear in stores and shopping malls are also a sales pitch?In stores from groceries to specialty clothing outlets, what was once benign background music is becoming increasingly targeted to specific audiences, like the varied sounds of radio stations. Sometimes the music is even interrupted by "deejays" pitching ads or public service announcements.You still hear "elevator music" (actually called "Environmental Music" by the pioneering Muzak firm)
NEWS
By SHEILA HIMMEL and SHEILA HIMMEL,SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | January 15, 2006
Now you hear it, now you hear it again. That used to be the rule for restaurants' background music. Through the late 1990s and into this millennium, you could go from trattoria to pizza parlor across the nation and hear Rosemary Clooney belting "Mambo Italiano." Fancy steakhouses have forever offered Frank Sinatra on a continuous loop, while at Rosa's Rosticeria in Santa Cruz, Calif., even some margarita drinkers got a little tired of Bob Marley's lilting reggae Legend album. No connection, but Rosa's has since closed.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 17, 1996
In the music department at the Wal-Mart on U.S. 40 near Rolling Road, I ask Russ Rewling for something really vulgar and blasphemous to play in my car, to soothe the savage beast in my vulgar and blasphemous heart."
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2009
I like music. But I tend to like the music I have picked out and purchased. What's more, I only like to listen to certain music at certain times. For example, I'll put on a particular group of artists when I'm feeling introspective, an entirely different group when I'm angry, another when I'm ecstatic and yet another when I'm nostalgic. As a result, all sorts of weird memories have attached themselves to songs in the repertoire of my life. To this day, I can't listen to Barry Manilow's "Mandy" without wanting to sit down and write a weepy, yearning love letter.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1998
That Muzak piped into your local mall or neighborhood grocery store might not sound much like elevator music. It might, in fact, be original Latino pop or Caribbean calypso, B.B. King or Foo Fighters, Whitney Houston or Nirvana. Today's Muzak, unlike the original single channel of re-recorded, instrumental pop songs, offers dozens of diverse channels, programming flexibility -- and, possibly, a chance to influence the shopping environment. The ability to tailor programs to suit specific store departments or times of day is appealing to more and more area retailers, said Barry L. Freedman, vice president of Baltimore-based Audio Communications Inc., a subsidiary of Audio Communications Network Inc. in Orlando, Fla. The network, a publicly traded affiliate of Muzak with $17.5 million in sales last year, operates through Muzak franchises in Maryland, California, Florida, Georgia and Missouri.
NEWS
By SHEILA HIMMEL and SHEILA HIMMEL,SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | January 15, 2006
Now you hear it, now you hear it again. That used to be the rule for restaurants' background music. Through the late 1990s and into this millennium, you could go from trattoria to pizza parlor across the nation and hear Rosemary Clooney belting "Mambo Italiano." Fancy steakhouses have forever offered Frank Sinatra on a continuous loop, while at Rosa's Rosticeria in Santa Cruz, Calif., even some margarita drinkers got a little tired of Bob Marley's lilting reggae Legend album. No connection, but Rosa's has since closed.
NEWS
By Larry Atkins | December 6, 2002
PHILADELPHIA -- Even though I'm only 41 years old, there are many signs that I'm starting to get old. My knees ache from arthritis and I limp like Walter Brennan after I try to play basketball. My eyesight and hearing are diminishing, as is my hairline. But perhaps one of the clearest signs that I'm getting older is that the music I grew up listening to has evolved into elevator music. During the past year, while eating at various fast-food restaurants, I've heard Muzak versions of Eric Clapton's "Let It Rain," Jethro Tull's "Bungle in the Jungle" and Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven."
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2001
"Even as a child, young Marshall exhibited a unique storytelling style." - Sarah Giles, Marshall Mathers' third-grade teacher Immediately after having the future rap star Eminem in her Detroit classroom, Sarah Giles retired from teaching. Officially, she cited "burnout" as the reason for her retirement at the age of 22. But recently released school records indicate Ms. Giles was "troubled" by the first songwriting efforts of young Marshall Mathers. Responding to media requests, school administrators have agreed to release some of Mathers' schoolwork - which, since 1980, has been the property of the FBI's Behavioral Sciences Unit.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1998
That Muzak piped into your local mall or neighborhood grocery store might not sound much like elevator music. It might, in fact, be original Latino pop or Caribbean calypso, B.B. King or Foo Fighters, Whitney Houston or Nirvana. Today's Muzak, unlike the original single channel of re-recorded, instrumental pop songs, offers dozens of diverse channels, programming flexibility -- and, possibly, a chance to influence the shopping environment. The ability to tailor programs to suit specific store departments or times of day is appealing to more and more area retailers, said Barry L. Freedman, vice president of Baltimore-based Audio Communications Inc., a subsidiary of Audio Communications Network Inc. in Orlando, Fla. The network, a publicly traded affiliate of Muzak with $17.5 million in sales last year, operates through Muzak franchises in Maryland, California, Florida, Georgia and Missouri.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 17, 1996
In the music department at the Wal-Mart on U.S. 40 near Rolling Road, I ask Russ Rewling for something really vulgar and blasphemous to play in my car, to soothe the savage beast in my vulgar and blasphemous heart."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Evening Sun Staff | December 15, 1990
It's the season to be shopping and merry music fills the air. But did you know the melodies you hear in stores and shopping malls are also a sales pitch?In stores from groceries to specialty clothing outlets, what was once benign background music is becoming increasingly targeted to specific audiences, like the varied sounds of radio stations. Sometimes the music is even interrupted by "deejays" pitching ads or public service announcements.You still hear "elevator music" (actually called "Environmental Music" by the pioneering Muzak firm)
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2001
"Even as a child, young Marshall exhibited a unique storytelling style." - Sarah Giles, Marshall Mathers' third-grade teacher Immediately after having the future rap star Eminem in her Detroit classroom, Sarah Giles retired from teaching. Officially, she cited "burnout" as the reason for her retirement at the age of 22. But recently released school records indicate Ms. Giles was "troubled" by the first songwriting efforts of young Marshall Mathers. Responding to media requests, school administrators have agreed to release some of Mathers' schoolwork - which, since 1980, has been the property of the FBI's Behavioral Sciences Unit.
NEWS
By W. H. Stevens | April 23, 1996
Down southeast BaltimoreWe went through the motionsof public education.Hungry stereotypic kidsbatting landslide minds-already-made-up opinion.''You hoodlums!'' screechedMrs. Mu-Zak. Claimedher minister husbandcould save us from alife of Dundalk Damnation.''To hell with you!''sneered the fat chemistryteacher. ''I get paidanyway,'' he slobbered,guzzling Pepsi in theSeptember cinder block heat.Shared torn lab books,notes scribbled with yellow nubs.Perched on three-legged chairs,we snickered knowinglyat dusty, empty blackboards.
FEATURES
By Liz Lufkin and Liz Lufkin,San Francisco Chronicle | September 14, 1990
WHEN CARDIOLOGIST Dr. Dominick Curatola opened hi own office in Los Altos, Calif., a few months ago, he knew exactly what he wanted. Muzak.Not just any old Muzak, though. At 37, Curatola is a self-described "Dead Head" who grew up listening to the Grateful Dead, Motown and Grand Funk Railroad.Now Curatola has acts like Crosby, Stills & Nash, Santana, Rod Stewart and Janet Jackson beamed directly into his office, via a program on Muzak's direct satellite-broadcast system called Foreground Music One, nicknamed FM One.These are not syrupy string renditions of pop hits that used to have rock fans climbing the elevator walls back in the '60s.
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