Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMute Swans
IN THE NEWS

Mute Swans

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 16, 2009
Mute swan no scapegoat for Chesapeake's ills In a recent op-ed ("Speaking Up for the Bay's Mute Swans," May 12) an animal rights advocate decries the killing of invasive mute swans as an unnecessary "slaughter" of a scapegoat for the Chesapeake Bay's myriad ills. The writer belittles the decades of science that formed the basis for the difficult decision to reduce the Chesapeake's feral mute swan population. There is in fact little real divergence of opinion among scientists and conservationists as to the danger that this non-native species poses to the Chesapeake and its wildlife.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 16, 2009
Mute swan no scapegoat for Chesapeake's ills In a recent op-ed ("Speaking Up for the Bay's Mute Swans," May 12) an animal rights advocate decries the killing of invasive mute swans as an unnecessary "slaughter" of a scapegoat for the Chesapeake Bay's myriad ills. The writer belittles the decades of science that formed the basis for the difficult decision to reduce the Chesapeake's feral mute swan population. There is in fact little real divergence of opinion among scientists and conservationists as to the danger that this non-native species poses to the Chesapeake and its wildlife.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Eleanor LeCain | May 12, 2009
Mute swans are among the most beautiful, graceful animals in the world, yet Maryland is brutally killing them. Where once 3,500 mute swans graced the Chesapeake Bay, systematic slaughter by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has reduced their numbers to about 500. Why would anyone kill these gorgeous animals? The DNR claims mute swans are an invasive species that upsets the local ecosystem of Chesapeake Bay by eating bay grasses. But these few swans have a negligible impact when compared to other factors affecting the bay. If DNR were really concerned about the health of the bay ecosystem, it would do more to stop the 500 million pounds of pollutants poured into the bay by factory farms, urban runoff and sewage treatment plants every year.
NEWS
By Eleanor LeCain | May 12, 2009
Mute swans are among the most beautiful, graceful animals in the world, yet Maryland is brutally killing them. Where once 3,500 mute swans graced the Chesapeake Bay, systematic slaughter by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has reduced their numbers to about 500. Why would anyone kill these gorgeous animals? The DNR claims mute swans are an invasive species that upsets the local ecosystem of Chesapeake Bay by eating bay grasses. But these few swans have a negligible impact when compared to other factors affecting the bay. If DNR were really concerned about the health of the bay ecosystem, it would do more to stop the 500 million pounds of pollutants poured into the bay by factory farms, urban runoff and sewage treatment plants every year.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2002
A federal appeals court has ruled that mute swans in Maryland and 12 other states must be protected under federal law, even though state biologists say the visitors from Asia have become a beautiful nuisance. The ruling has halted, at least temporarily, a long-planned state effort to control the swans' exploding population in Chesapeake Bay waters. The orange-beaked birds, natives of Asia by way of Europe, were imported for their beauty in the 1800s. But unlike the black-beaked tundra swans which visit the Chesapeake region for the winter, mute swans live here year-round, gobbling up the underwater grasses that sustain a variety of bay creatures and attacking the nests of rare native birds.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2002
A state plan for controlling beautiful but destructive mute swans calls for creating "exclusion zones" where the birds would be eliminated by several means, including lethal injection or shooting, officials said. The plan, due to be made public in about two weeks, does not call for getting rid of the birds entirely. It would keep them out of sensitive areas -- places where the swans are eating all the underwater grasses, behaving aggressively toward people, or trampling nests of increasingly rare native birds such as black ducks and least terns.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2001
SO YOU LOVE birds and beasts, and the great outdoors, and you want to become a wildlife manager. Here's a case to see whether you're up to the job. Your charges include about 4,000 of the biggest, most appealing and elegant birds on Earth, Maryland's population of mute swans. Your task is to decide how many should die. Let's start by learning not to say "kill." Say "cull." "Euthanize" is good, too. Don't dwell on "reducing the swan population." Better to say "manage swans more aggressively."
NEWS
By EIRIK A.T. BLOM | March 5, 1993
Bel Air. -- There comes a moment when a serious environmentalist has to suck it up and kill something.In England all mute swans belong to the queen, and anyone harming one is liable to penalty. Despite our unseemly fascination with the common behavior of the royal family, we are no longer a crown colony, so nothing except public opinion stands in the way of disposing of the mute swans that havepopulated the Chesapeake Bay. Public opinion mistakenly favors the swans, which are large, graceful, white birds that catch and hold the eye.Maryland's most obvious pair of mute swans spends most of the year in the small pond at the east end of the Bay Bridge, where they serve as nature's billboard, the first tangible proof that one is on the Eastern Shore.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | December 12, 1993
This spring it is likely that fishing with live aquatic bait again will be permitted in Liberty, Prettyboy and Loch Raven reservoirs, which had been closed to the use of live bait for fear that contaminated bait might lead to zebra mussel infestation in Baltimore's water supply.A proposed regulation has been approved and forwarded by the Department of Natural Resources for implementation on Feb. 14, following a public hearing and an open period for public comment on the regulation.In order for live bait to be used in the reservoirs, it must be purchased from a dealer whose source of supply and holding equipment has been certified free of zebra mussels by the DNR.The regulation was formulated with the cooperation of the Department of Public Works and the Maryland Aquatic Resources Coalition.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2003
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has given Maryland permission to shoot another 525 mute swans, an animal that officials blame for widespread damage to the fragile Chesapeake Bay. But the agency's decision to issue the shooting permit sparked an immediate legal challenge from a Washington-based environmental group that objects to the killings. Under the terms of the permit, which was issued Monday and will take effect Aug. 27, the state Department of Natural Resources would have authority to shoot the swans until Dec. 31, after which the state would receive a new permit.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Reporter | April 19, 2007
It starts with aerial photos then switches to hip boots on the ground and boats in the water. Little by little, state wildlife biologists are reclaiming the Chesapeake Bay from mute swans. Where two years ago, more than 3,600 of the graceful white birds filled the bay and tributaries, fewer than 1,500 remain. Just as there is no denying the beauty of the swans, there is no denying their destructiveness. The swans eat precious underwater plants that provide sanctuary for fish and crabs and food for wintering waterfowl, such as canvasback ducks.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2005
A federal judge cleared the way yesterday for Maryland wildlife officials to start killing mute swans, ending a two-year challenge from animal-rights groups to save the beautiful but destructive birds. U.S. District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan denied a petition from the Humane Society of the United States and the Fund for Animals to extend federal protections to the birds, which now number more than 3,600 in Maryland and are multiplying quickly. The non-native swans consume large amounts of Chesapeake Bay grasses, which provide food for migratory birds and crucial habitat for crabs and other bay life.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2005
An animal rights group sued in federal court yesterday to prevent Maryland wildlife biologists from shooting up to 2,000 swans over the next two years, a move state officials say is designed to preserve Chesapeake Bay. The Fund for Animals contends that the state's plans to shoot the mute swans will increase the likelihood that their Eastern Shore members will see "the killing of birds, or dead, wounded or dying animals." The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Washington, asks the judge to reverse an administrative decision allowing the state to shoot the birds by exempting the swans from protections granted other migratory birds.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2004
A last-minute addition to an omnibus federal spending bill has cleared the way for Maryland wildlife officials to resume killing mute swans that destroy Chesapeake Bay grasses. The language, approved Tuesday night, removes an ambiguity in the Migratory Bird Treaty Act that allowed a federal judge to halt a state plan to eradicate 525 adult swans last year. Those swans and as many as 94 other non-native species will no longer be protected by the act. President Bush signed the bill into law yesterday.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2003
A federal judge prohibited yesterday Maryland wildlife officials from killing hundreds of mute swans until a lawsuit filed by an animal protection group is resolved. U.S. District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan issued an injunction preventing the state Department of Natural Resources from killing 525 mute swans by the end of the year. The ruling extended an injunction Sullivan issued Aug. 19 to give him more time to consider the case. DNR planned to shoot and lethally inject the swans this fall as a first step toward trimming the state's mute swan population from 3,600 to about 500. State officials say the plan is necessary because the swan's numbers are increasing drastically.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2003
A federal judge will decide in the next few days whether state wildlife officials may begin shooting hundreds of mute swans this fall or must wait until a lawsuit to save the swans is resolved. U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan scheduled a hearing for Tuesday to announce his decision. But he also may issue a written ruling before then. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service issued a permit last month allowing the Maryland Department of Natural Resources to shoot up to 525 mute swans this year.
NEWS
April 25, 2003
Shooting swans is wrong way to save the bay As a birdwatcher for more than 40 years, I am appalled by the stupidity and cruelty of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources' plan to shoot 1,500 mute swans ("State to shoot 1,500 mute swans to help rid bay of nuisance," April 22). The state's case for this ill-advised plan of action apparently rests on two premises: First, that the birds are not native to North America. Second, that they consume millions of pounds of bay grasses. Both of these points can be easily answered.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1998
WHEN ASKED about Maryland's population, I used to say around 5 million people, and increasing rapidly -- as if humans held the only franchise on the place.Increasingly, we cannot ignore other claimants, such as the following:Black bears, 300 to 500; white-tailed deer, 300,000; tens of thousands of nutria; coyotes and beaver that have spread to every county; 3,000 mute swans and 70,000 non-migratory Canada geese.All are wild, large, visible and flourishing, and in the fifth most densely populated (with humans)
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 19, 2003
A federal judge in Washington has put on hold Maryland's plans to shoot hundreds of mute swans at least until Sept. 2. U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan issued an order Friday that prevents Maryland officials from shooting swans until he decides whether to grant an injunction sought by the Fund for Animals. Sullivan scheduled a hearing Sept. 2 to consider the injunction. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service issued a permit to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources Aug. 11 that allows the state to shoot up to 525 mute swans this year.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2003
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has given Maryland permission to shoot another 525 mute swans, an animal that officials blame for widespread damage to the fragile Chesapeake Bay. But the agency's decision to issue the shooting permit sparked an immediate legal challenge from a Washington-based environmental group that objects to the killings. Under the terms of the permit, which was issued Monday and will take effect Aug. 27, the state Department of Natural Resources would have authority to shoot the swans until Dec. 31, after which the state would receive a new permit.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.