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By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Dan Fesperman contributed to this article | March 7, 1995
An international fugitive sought for shipping 90 tons of mustard gas ingredients from Baltimore to Iran has again eluded U.S. justice -- this time by winning release from a Croatian prison.In a phone interview yesterday from the Far Trade shipping company in his native Germany, a jovial Peter Walaschek had a message for U.S. authorities: Better luck next time."Tell Dennis Bass to give me a call," Walaschek said from Bonn, referring to the Baltimore-based U.S. Customs investigator who built the case against him in 1989.
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NEWS
September 9, 2011
Even as Libya's rebels prepare to attack the last remaining strongholds of former dictator Muammar Gadhafi, disturbing reports have surfaced of widespread looting at weapons caches abandoned by his retreating forces. The regime's stockpiles included thousands of portable surface-to-air missiles that terrorists could use to shoot down civilian airliners, as well as chemical warheads containing lethal mustard gas. There's no immediate way of knowing exactly how many weapons have gone missing or where they are now, but it's urgent that the new transitional government and its NATO allies move quickly to secure as many of them as possible before they fall into the wrong hands.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 6, 2004
In a formal declaration yesterday, Libya disclosed that it had produced and stored 20 tons of deadly mustard gas, according to an international disarmament body that monitors the ban on chemical weapons. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, the group based in The Hague, Netherlands, charged with ridding the world of chemical weapons, said that a Libyan official had turned over to the organization more than a dozen folders containing details of the illicit chemical weapons program.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 6, 2004
In a formal declaration yesterday, Libya disclosed that it had produced and stored 20 tons of deadly mustard gas, according to an international disarmament body that monitors the ban on chemical weapons. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, the group based in The Hague, Netherlands, charged with ridding the world of chemical weapons, said that a Libyan official had turned over to the organization more than a dozen folders containing details of the illicit chemical weapons program.
NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | August 11, 1991
It takes an incinerator heated to more than 700 degrees Fahrenheit to burn mustard gas.That's just about how hot things can get for Charlie Baronian, technical director of the Army's chemical weapons disposal program, headquartered at Aberdeen Proving Ground.As deputy manager, he presides over plans to build a huge furnace to burn tons of mustard gas stored at APG.Opponents worry that incinerator malfunctions at APG or any of seven other sites planned across the country would rain down an invisible cloud of poison in a heavily populated areas.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | December 21, 2003
WASHINGTON - By unraveling Libya's program for weapons of mass destruction, U.S. spy agencies and international arms control authorities are hoping to unlock some of the mysteries in the world of illicit trade in nuclear, chemical and biological materials, senior U.S. intelligence officials said yesterday. In agreeing to give up its weapons programs, Libya told U.S. and British spy agencies that it possesses tons of mustard gas and other chemical weapons materials, facilities that could manufacture germ weapons, Scud missiles and a more advanced nuclear weapons program than previously known, the officials said.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | January 17, 1991
Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, D-Md, says she is convinced the Baltimore VA Medical Center's plan to handle Persian Gulf casualties "is fit for duty."Wounded men and women could begin to arrive at the Loch Raven Boulevard hospital, where physicians have been trained to treat chemical and biological warfare exposure, within five days after American casualties are reported, hospital officials said."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 10, 2001
WASHINGTON - Federal agents are planning to fan out across the country this week in an effort to recruit U.S. businesses in the war on terror, urging companies to notify the government of suspicious customers. Robert C. Bonner, commissioner of the Customs Service, said he had developed a list of about 100 items that authorities believe terrorists want to buy in the United States. Starting today, Bonner said, federal agents will visit the manufacturers, emphasize the need for vigilance and encourage them to inform the Customs Service at once if they are approached by anyone trying to buy these items for possibly illegal shipment abroad.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 8, 2003
V CORPS HEADQUARTERS, in northern Kuwait -- U.S. soldiers searching an empty military training camp in the Karbala area have found several drums that, according to preliminary tests, may contain deadly nerve agents and mustard gas. Officials here promptly notified the Defense Department about the discovery, which was made Sunday. "We're treating it as real. We're reporting it as real," said Col. Tim Madere, the top chemical warfare officer in the V Corps of the Army. But additional tests must be conducted before the possibility of a false reading can be excluded.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- There were no congratulations on Capitol Hill yesterday, no accolades when U.S. Customs Agent Dennis J. Bass finished describing the inventive investigation in 1988 that had linked a Baltimore chemical company with the suspected manufacture of deadly mustard gas in Iran and Iraq.Instead, irritated congressmen greeted Agent Bass' testimony with questions -- some of them verging on the hostile.What had taken Customs so long to expose Alcolac International's shipments of the chemicals to the Persian Gulf, the congressmen wanted to know.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | December 21, 2003
WASHINGTON - By unraveling Libya's program for weapons of mass destruction, U.S. spy agencies and international arms control authorities are hoping to unlock some of the mysteries in the world of illicit trade in nuclear, chemical and biological materials, senior U.S. intelligence officials said yesterday. In agreeing to give up its weapons programs, Libya told U.S. and British spy agencies that it possesses tons of mustard gas and other chemical weapons materials, facilities that could manufacture germ weapons, Scud missiles and a more advanced nuclear weapons program than previously known, the officials said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 8, 2003
V CORPS HEADQUARTERS, in northern Kuwait -- U.S. soldiers searching an empty military training camp in the Karbala area have found several drums that, according to preliminary tests, may contain deadly nerve agents and mustard gas. Officials here promptly notified the Defense Department about the discovery, which was made Sunday. "We're treating it as real. We're reporting it as real," said Col. Tim Madere, the top chemical warfare officer in the V Corps of the Army. But additional tests must be conducted before the possibility of a false reading can be excluded.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 10, 2001
WASHINGTON - Federal agents are planning to fan out across the country this week in an effort to recruit U.S. businesses in the war on terror, urging companies to notify the government of suspicious customers. Robert C. Bonner, commissioner of the Customs Service, said he had developed a list of about 100 items that authorities believe terrorists want to buy in the United States. Starting today, Bonner said, federal agents will visit the manufacturers, emphasize the need for vigilance and encourage them to inform the Customs Service at once if they are approached by anyone trying to buy these items for possibly illegal shipment abroad.
NEWS
October 10, 1996
THE NUMBER OF people willing to accept as truth a disputed allegation that the CIA helped sponsor the drug dealers who introduced crack cocaine into America's ghettoes shouldn't be surprising. The CIA has been caught so many times either covering up or skirting the truth that many citizens are convinced government agencies are capable of anything.This environment of mistrust is reinforced by the Defense Department's acknowledged mishandling of a years-long investigation of what caused thousands of GIs to come home from the Persian Gulf war with ailments ranging from hair loss to abdominal pains.
NEWS
By SHELDON TROMBERG | May 3, 1995
San Francisco -- "Good afternoon listeners, I'm Jack Sprat, captain of the airwaves. Join me daily, Monday through Friday on KMAD, your favorite California station for the Right Kind of Talk. Hello, you're on KMAD.''''I'm Johnny Jones, conservative Caucasian male, pro-life, pro-gun, pro-family, anti-affirmative action, middle-class, lawn-mowing car-washing suburbanite. Former county police officer, now self-employed as a sometimes chauffeur and part-time mace instructor. I'm also a first-time caller.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Dan Fesperman contributed to this article | March 7, 1995
An international fugitive sought for shipping 90 tons of mustard gas ingredients from Baltimore to Iran has again eluded U.S. justice -- this time by winning release from a Croatian prison.In a phone interview yesterday from the Far Trade shipping company in his native Germany, a jovial Peter Walaschek had a message for U.S. authorities: Better luck next time."Tell Dennis Bass to give me a call," Walaschek said from Bonn, referring to the Baltimore-based U.S. Customs investigator who built the case against him in 1989.
NEWS
October 10, 1996
THE NUMBER OF people willing to accept as truth a disputed allegation that the CIA helped sponsor the drug dealers who introduced crack cocaine into America's ghettoes shouldn't be surprising. The CIA has been caught so many times either covering up or skirting the truth that many citizens are convinced government agencies are capable of anything.This environment of mistrust is reinforced by the Defense Department's acknowledged mishandling of a years-long investigation of what caused thousands of GIs to come home from the Persian Gulf war with ailments ranging from hair loss to abdominal pains.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | January 18, 1991
Nerve gas is highly toxic and has more potential to kill than other rarely used chemicals that could be unleashed during the Persian Gulf conflict, says a Baltimore Veterans Administration Medical Center specialist.Nerve gas attacks the entire nervous system, making breathing and movement difficult and possibly causing the victim's heart to stop beating, Dr. Sandra T. Marshall, an internist, said yesterday.Like mustard gas, another debilitating chemical that causes blisters on the surface of the body and respiratory and intestinal burns, nerve gas can be delivered by shell, rocket, missile or by spray from an aircraft.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1995
It took federal agents six years to locate German exporter Peter Walaschek, wanted as an international fugitive for illegally shipping 90 tons of mustard gas ingredients from Baltimore to Iran in the late 1980s.And now that he's finally in custody, the long arm of American law may not reach him.Walaschek, whose 1988 conviction in Baltimore came shortly after thousands died from chemical warfare in the Iran-Iraq war, has been in a Croatian jail for more than three months as authorities try to sort out a myriad of problems surrounding extradition.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 7, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In often-poignant testimony, veterans -- from World War II as well as Desert Storm -- told Congress yesterday of being unwitting medical subjects for a military they said has since abandoned them.Speaking before the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee, they described numerous illnesses and other health problems that they blamed on secret experiments, preventive drugs or vaccines they were given, or exposure to environmental chemicals or other possible hazards.Moreover, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)
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