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NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 15, 2002
STILLWATER, Minn. - In the growing annals of invasive species, the fingernail-size zebra mussel hardly seems as fearsome as others that have recently made headlines - the bighead carp that have been leaping onto fishing boats in the Mississippi River, the "Frankenfish" snakehead that ate a Maryland pond. But what the zebra mussel lacks in style, it makes up for in destructive ability: Tiny but prolific, they can quickly take over a body of water, clogging power plant intake pipes, stealing food and oxygen from other species and even suffocating the native mussels that they attach themselves to and eventually encrust.
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NEWS
By Rex Springston and Bill Godsil and Rex Springston and Bill Godsil,RICHMOND TIMES-DISPATCH | August 28, 2002
CLEVELAND, Va. - Snorkeling in the cool Clinch River, biologist Fred Huber pointed to an unusual creature resting on the bottom, a wavy-rayed lampmussel. The silver-dollar-size mollusk flaunted a thin, fleshy flap that extended from inside its shell. The flap resembled a minnow in its color, shape and fluttering motion. Huber pointed just inside the flap where baby mussels clung, ready to leave their mother. Hitching a ride Popping his head above water, Huber explained that baby mussels live part of their lives on the gills of fish.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2002
Zebra mussels, one of the most notorious aquatic pests in the nation, have been discovered in a small New York reservoir that feeds into the Susquehanna River, and top scientists are meeting today to outline a plan to prevent them from spreading in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The tiny mollusks, which are native to Europe and have no natural enemies here, have spread rapidly since they were brought to the Great Lakes in a ship's ballast water in the early 1980s. They grow so quickly that they can clog intake pipes at power plants, factories and municipal water plants, forcing them to shut down.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | March 20, 2002
Candy colors In yet another move toward globalization, the makers of M&M's candies are asking citizens from 75 countries to vote on a matter of utmost importance - a new M&M's color. Candidates in the running are pink, violet and aqua. One will be selected in June to join six existing colors. Fans can vote by logging on to gcv.mms.com or calling 877-MM-GLOBE before May 31. Mad for mussels You'll find no shortage of ideas on how to prepare mussels, thanks to a new Web site from the Great Eastern Mussel Farms, the largest mussel aquaculture grower in the United States.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | May 20, 2001
Like much of south Baltimore, Baltimore's venerable brew pub Sisson's has gotten gussied up. If the term fern bar didn't have a derogatory connotation, I could call it that. Not that there are ferns around; but the newly renovated Sisson's has that pretty blond wood, exposed brick look that will be anathema to people who hung out there in the '80s when it was still a neighborhood saloon. Sisson's has new owners, a new look and, above all, a new menu. Gone is the combination of pub grub, Cajun dishes and food cooked in beer.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 23, 2000
LAKE GEORGE, N.Y. -- A year and a half ago, it looked as if Lake George, a blue jewel in the green Adirondacks, had dodged a biological bullet -- the zebra mussel, an invasive European mollusk that is clogging pipes, crowding local aquatic life and turning beaches into toe-slicing shell heaps from Michigan to the Hudson River. Scientists had found microscopic mussel larvae in the water, probably imported in the bilges of boats. But lab tests showed that some quirk of Lake George chemistry -- probably a lack of calcium -- seemed to keep them from maturing and reproducing.
FEATURES
By Joe Stumpe and Joe Stumpe,KNIGHT RIDDER/ TRIBUNE | March 29, 2000
"Yum!" said the checkout woman scanning the bag of mussels. "I haven't had those in forever." Such is the enthusiasm of many people for mussels. Their distinctive sea-sweet flesh, ease of preparation and visually dramatic presentation are all ideal for the home cook. Lightly steamed with white wine and garlic, sitting atop a bowl of pasta or broiled a la oysters Rockefeller, mussels star in a variety of appetizer and main dishes. And yet, as the second part of the woman's statement shows, mussels aren't the first thing that springs to mind when most shoppers think seafood.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | March 8, 2000
When Seattle Chef Christine Keff cooks a piece of fish, it is rarely rare. "I cook it all the way through, so it flakes," she said. "You want doneness, but not dryness." There are a few exceptions. Salmon and tuna can be medium, she said, but not raw. Fish that is undercooked has the wrong texture, Keff said. In a word, it is "tough." Chefs who serve fish with cold midsections may be "trying to make a point," Keff said, but they aren't doing much for their customers' taste buds. Keff's opinions matter because she made her culinary reputation and garnered honors by cooking seafood.
NEWS
By Zerline A. Hughes and Zerline A. Hughes,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1999
A statewide civil rights group has filed lawsuits against two Baltimore restaurants accusing them of failing to accommodate people with disabilities as required by federal law.More than 40 people -- many of them in wheelchairs or on crutches -- gathered Wednesday in Fells Point to close a five-week statewide campaign by ACCESS Maryland to bring attention to the failure of businesses to provide access to the disabled.As part of the campaign, the nonprofit agency has filed 14 federal lawsuits against hotels, clothing stores, banks, and the restaurants.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | November 15, 1998
In the review of Legal Sea Foods in today's Home & Family section, the service should have received two stars, for fair or uneven.The Sun regrets the errors.The world is in a sorry state when this is the first thing on a restaurant's menu: "Our pristine shellfish comes from cold New England waters and is inspected for purity by state certified Registered Sanitarians in our own microbiology laboratory."OK, it's sad. But a few of Legal Sea Foods' fat, icy-cold, briny-sweet oysters slithering down your throat will cheer you right up. Follow them with several plump littleneck and cherrystone clams, accompanied by Legal's lime and chili salsa, and you won't be able to keep from smiling.
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