Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMussels
IN THE NEWS

Mussels

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Throwing a party is no reason to panic ­ - or spend a fortune. One of Chef Nikki McGowan's go-to party dishes is a huge pot of mussels, which she loves because they are simple to prepare and inexpensive - but also delicious and fun to eat.  McGowan, who teaches cooking classes for kids and adults at CKCS Foods (ckcsweb.com), serves the mussels in big bowls with lots of bread for dipping. Kids love getting a little messy, and even the less-adventurous eaters can be coaxed into dipping a piece of crusty bread into the sauce.  For adults, the dish's exotic flavors are a hit. And for the host, mussels mean only a few minutes in the kitchen - and a small price tag, even when feeding a crowd.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Throwing a party is no reason to panic ­ - or spend a fortune. One of Chef Nikki McGowan's go-to party dishes is a huge pot of mussels, which she loves because they are simple to prepare and inexpensive - but also delicious and fun to eat.  McGowan, who teaches cooking classes for kids and adults at CKCS Foods (ckcsweb.com), serves the mussels in big bowls with lots of bread for dipping. Kids love getting a little messy, and even the less-adventurous eaters can be coaxed into dipping a piece of crusty bread into the sauce.  For adults, the dish's exotic flavors are a hit. And for the host, mussels mean only a few minutes in the kitchen - and a small price tag, even when feeding a crowd.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Mark Graham and Mark Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 3, 2005
Because I'm not a big fan of mussels, the shellfish rarely show up on my menu at home. But this garlicky dish is an exception. It's delicious and quick. It is always best to consume mussels the same day you purchase them. Small black mussels work best for this recipe, and you can substitute small clams if mussels are not your thing. Purge them quickly by immersing in cold water to expel any sand. Then, quickly scrub each mussel clean with a brush and cut off any beard (hairlike filaments attached to the shell)
SPORTS
By Eric Meany and The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
Although it has been more than 11 years since Memorial Stadium was demolished, much of the concrete that once made up the bygone home of the Orioles, Colts and Ravens continues to host a hotbed of activity nearly 18 miles southeast of its previous location. In 2002, approximately 10,000 cubic yards of rubble from the stadium was deposited over a 6-acre site on the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay, 3 miles west of Tolchester Beach in Kent County. Every year since then, the Perry Hall chapter of the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishing Association has organized the construction and placement of reef balls - hollow, flat-bottomed concrete blobs with holes - on a 1-acre section of the Memorial Stadium reef.
NEWS
By Rex Springston and Bill Godsil and Rex Springston and Bill Godsil,RICHMOND TIMES-DISPATCH | August 28, 2002
CLEVELAND, Va. - Snorkeling in the cool Clinch River, biologist Fred Huber pointed to an unusual creature resting on the bottom, a wavy-rayed lampmussel. The silver-dollar-size mollusk flaunted a thin, fleshy flap that extended from inside its shell. The flap resembled a minnow in its color, shape and fluttering motion. Huber pointed just inside the flap where baby mussels clung, ready to leave their mother. Hitching a ride Popping his head above water, Huber explained that baby mussels live part of their lives on the gills of fish.
NEWS
By Jim Robbins and Jim Robbins,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 8, 2002
This fall is turning out to be the deadliest yet for loons, ducks and other birds that encounter a natural outbreak of a rare form of the nerve toxin botulism in Lake Erie. Ward Stone, director of the New York Department of Environmental Conservation Pathology Laboratory in Delmar, N.Y., which studies the dead birds, said that over the last two weeks his staff had picked up more than 5,500 birds along the shores of Lake Erie in western New York, between Buffalo and Dunkirk, including 126 loons, 4,500 long-tailed ducks, geese, grebes, mergansers, scaups and many types of gulls.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2004
Over the centuries, mariners have wondered how mussels manage to stick so tightly to the sides of ships. Researchers at Purdue University say they might have figured out the mussels' secret: They extract iron from seawater to create their glue. The results could help scientists create new superglues and develop nontoxic paints to rid ship bottoms of barnacles and other pests. Their four-year study analyzed the adhesive created by 800 blue mussels collected off the Maine coast - the kind that grow about four inches long and are staples at many East Coast seafood restaurants.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2011
Driving around looking for a place to park can cut into a lunch hour, and Mama's on the Half Shell , at 2901 O'Donnell St. in Canton, happens to be in a neighborhood where parking is at a premium. Our recent visit required a five-block hike, and we felt lucky to get as close as we do without having to cruise the neighborhood watching lunch minutes tick by. It really helps that Mama's, a tavern for seafood lovers, is worth enduring that inevitable city-life hassle. 12:45 We enter a packed Mama's, jammed upstairs and down, and learn we're looking at a 20-minute wait for a table for two. We note a handful of tables up front and a long bar, every chair filled, and a few people standing along the wall behind the bar. We're later told that this is an exceptionally busy time of year for the tavern.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2011
The words "beer food" bring to mind items like pretzels, peanuts and pizza. But at Red Brick Station in White Marsh the term means mussels steamed in ale, fish dipped in a beery batter and meat marinated in stout. Here, the beer is often in the food. It works, in part because the beer is fresh. There is a brewery on the premises, between the bar and the dining room. It also works because the kitchen has a nice touch with spices. The concept here is to serve English-style ales and English pub fare.
SPORTS
By Eric Meany and The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
Although it has been more than 11 years since Memorial Stadium was demolished, much of the concrete that once made up the bygone home of the Orioles, Colts and Ravens continues to host a hotbed of activity nearly 18 miles southeast of its previous location. In 2002, approximately 10,000 cubic yards of rubble from the stadium was deposited over a 6-acre site on the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay, 3 miles west of Tolchester Beach in Kent County. Every year since then, the Perry Hall chapter of the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishing Association has organized the construction and placement of reef balls - hollow, flat-bottomed concrete blobs with holes - on a 1-acre section of the Memorial Stadium reef.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2012
Zebra mussels have finally made their way down the Susquehanna River to the Chesapeake Bay, though it's unclear what if any harm the invasive aquatic species might do there. This month, state biologists found 20 of the non-native shellfish attached to three channel marker buoys off Havre de Grace as they were removing the buoys from the water for the winter, the Department of Natural Resources reported. Native to the Caspian and other seas in eastern Europe, zebra mussels were first discovered in the United States in the Great Lakes region in the 1980s, likely transported there in the ballast water of ships.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
Portside Tavern in Canton has a new chef, Freddie Melgar. Melgar, who worked for Washington, D.C.'s Madhatter Group and the northern Virginia-based Great American Restaurants, has introduced a new Prince Island mussels menu. The newly released menu features six preparations including the "Mostard," with spicy bison sausage, leeks, Dijon and thyme broth; the "Jalfrezzi" with red pepper, onion, garlic, curry, tomato and coconut milk and the "Baltimore," with Old Bay, garlic, herbs and IPA beer broth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, Special To The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2011
For lovers of Asian flavors, organic and local food and, of course, noodles, the new Republic Noodle in Federal Hill hits a sweet spot. Owners David Lynch and Christopher Boylan — who live nearby — opened the Asian restaurant in September, hoping to make it a new neighborhood favorite. With Lynch and chef de cuisine Henry Hong, formerly of Suzie's Soba, working the wok, and a menu gathering flavors and cooking methods from across the continent (the name "Republic Noodle" is a nod to the pan-Asian approach)
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2011
Alonso's in Roland Park is an unpretentious restaurant in a pretentious part of the city. Since 1931, it's been serving modest food and good beer to much acclaim and many satisfied customers. It hasn't changed one bit over the years. Well over three-quarters full and bustling is how we found Alonso's on a Wednesday night. A relaxed crowd of older patrons, families and couples filled the seats and booths. The missing tiles in the ceiling suggested that Alonso's is renovating (it's not)
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2011
Dining adventures at Gateway Overlook begin in the parking lot. In true Columbia fashion, one doesn't so much drive through as wend around. With a big-box centerpiece, this mall also has satellite buildings, many filled with restaurants. Lots of cars, no grid. Pack your GPS. Mamma Lucia resides in the same section as the more easily spotted Trader Joe's. Like its neighbors, Mama Lucia is a chain, a regional one started in Rockville. Its owners advertise "down home Italian cooking" and hefty portions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2011
The words "beer food" bring to mind items like pretzels, peanuts and pizza. But at Red Brick Station in White Marsh the term means mussels steamed in ale, fish dipped in a beery batter and meat marinated in stout. Here, the beer is often in the food. It works, in part because the beer is fresh. There is a brewery on the premises, between the bar and the dining room. It also works because the kitchen has a nice touch with spices. The concept here is to serve English-style ales and English pub fare.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN REPORTER | April 19, 2006
Fish on a First-Name Basis By Rob DeBorde Simply Shellfish By Leslie Glover Pendleton William Morrow / 2006 / $24.95 This book features 125 easy shellfish recipes, most of which take less than 30 minutes to prepare. Oysters, shrimp, crab, clams, mussels, lobster and squid are the main ingredients of dishes with Latin, Asian and Italian accents. You'll also find advice on purchasing, cleaning, storing and serving sizes for various types of shellfish. liz.atwood@baltsun.com Iron-skillet mussels with coconut-carrot sauce Serves 4 COCONUT-CARROT SAUCE: 2 cups chicken stock 2 tablespoons peanut oil 1 tablespoon minced garlic 2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger 1 cup canned coconut milk 1 cup carrot juice 10 fresh basil leaves 5 fresh or frozen kaffir lime leaves 1 tablespoon palm sugar (available at Asian markets)
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 16, 2005
Dottie Crow and her husband of Pismo Beach, Calif., enjoyed a pasta dish with shrimp, mussels and chopped tomatoes that was served to them while they were visiting the Carmel Mission Inn. She was hoping someone would have a similar recipe that she could prepare at home. Carl Covington from Boonville, Mo., apparently did some Internet research and sent in several versions of shrimp and mussels over pasta. The recipe he submitted for Fettuccine Provencal With Mussels and Shrimp seemed to most closely resemble what the Crows are looking for. This seafood dish is grand enough to serve to company yet simple enough to prepare anytime, particularly in winter when fresh mussels from the Atlantic Ocean are at their peak of quality.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2011
Driving around looking for a place to park can cut into a lunch hour, and Mama's on the Half Shell , at 2901 O'Donnell St. in Canton, happens to be in a neighborhood where parking is at a premium. Our recent visit required a five-block hike, and we felt lucky to get as close as we do without having to cruise the neighborhood watching lunch minutes tick by. It really helps that Mama's, a tavern for seafood lovers, is worth enduring that inevitable city-life hassle. 12:45 We enter a packed Mama's, jammed upstairs and down, and learn we're looking at a 20-minute wait for a table for two. We note a handful of tables up front and a long bar, every chair filled, and a few people standing along the wall behind the bar. We're later told that this is an exceptionally busy time of year for the tavern.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | December 26, 2010
I would like to address a snarky letter from Mr. Robert L. Dunker Jr., of Catonsville. A Republican (and former Democrat), my dear Mr. Dunker expressed skepticism about the worthiness of a $4 million, taxpayer-funded project described in this space in late October, and he questioned my regard for facts. Instead of challenging him to a duel, I thought I'd just write a column in response. "I realize that as a columnist you have no obligation to check the facts," one of the many sentences in Mr. Dunker's letter began.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.