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NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2004
Ignoring pleas from members of the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee, the Baltimore County school board unanimously approved last night a 2005-2006 school year calendar that excludes two important Muslim holidays. Several board members who spoke before the vote said they realized the county's population is multicultural, but they would not vote to change the calendar. "More than usual, this year has been a great learning experience for this board," said member Jean M.H. Jung.
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EXPLORE
By AEGIS STAFF REPORT | August 30, 2011
Muslims in Harford County celebrated the end of the holy month of Ramadan with a prayer ceremony Tuesday morning at the Bel Air Reckord Armory. As more than a billion Muslims worldwide celebrated completion of the month of Ramadan, Harford's Muslims assembled at the armory on Main Street to offer traditional Eid Prayers. The Eid Prayers ceremony is a family event and is attended by men, women and children, explained Dr. Rehan Khan of Masjid Al-Falaah, Harford County's Muslim education center in Abingdon.
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NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2005
The Baltimore County school system has proposed a calendar for the 2006-2007 academic year that does not include days off for the two most religious Muslim holidays, despite more than a year of lobbying by the Muslim community. The proposed calendar, which does include a day off for the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur, will be presented to the school board tonight. The board is scheduled to vote on the proposal next month. Bash Pharoan, president of the Baltimore County Muslim Council, said he would continue fighting for the schools to close for Muslim holidays.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 21, 2007
BAGHDAD -- A suicide bomber edged into a crowd of Iraqi officials and U.S. forces gathered for a meeting north of Baghdad yesterday, killing as many as 12 people, including an American soldier. It was one of three attacks nationwide that shattered the peaceful start of the Muslim holiday Eid al-Adha, which began Wednesday for Sunni Muslims. Shiites begin celebrating the four-day holiday today. The violence underscored what a U.S. official called the "great security threats" still looming in Iraq, threats illustrated by two recent discoveries.
NEWS
January 28, 2005
TOWSON - Baltimore County schools Superintendent Joe A. Hairston said this week that he will appoint a task force to study how the school system creates its calendar. Hairston is responding to a request from school board member Michael P. Kennedy, who said at a board meeting Tuesday night that he wants to find common ground with the county's Muslim community. For the past year, the Muslim community has been lobbying the board to close school on its two most important holidays, Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha.
NEWS
May 15, 2005
MUSLIM PARENTS and community leaders have asked the Baltimore County school board to recognize two Muslim high holy days as countywide school holidays. With the backing of the Maryland State Board of Education, the school board has refused - at least during the next two school years. Given the premium on school instruction days and the fact that the system allows for excused absences when any student wishes to observe a religious holiday, the school board's position is reasonable. While about 44 percent of Baltimore County students are identified as racial minorities, school officials don't know the breakdown by religious affiliation.
EXPLORE
By AEGIS STAFF REPORT | August 30, 2011
Muslims in Harford County celebrated the end of the holy month of Ramadan with a prayer ceremony Tuesday morning at the Bel Air Reckord Armory. As more than a billion Muslims worldwide celebrated completion of the month of Ramadan, Harford's Muslims assembled at the armory on Main Street to offer traditional Eid Prayers. The Eid Prayers ceremony is a family event and is attended by men, women and children, explained Dr. Rehan Khan of Masjid Al-Falaah, Harford County's Muslim education center in Abingdon.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,sun reporter | April 25, 2007
Flanked by her two young daughters, Nazma Khan-Edwards sat in the front row during last night's Baltimore County school board meeting to support a years-long push to close schools for Muslim holidays. Her girls, 11-year-old Shazia and 6-year-old Elyse, needed to be there, she said, so that they could see fellow Muslims standing up for themselves. "We Muslims have to hold our heads high," said Khan-Edwards, whose family emigrated from Bangladesh in 1977. "It's important for my kids to be recognized for what they are. It's important for us to have the Muslim holidays off to celebrate with our families.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 21, 2007
BAGHDAD -- A suicide bomber edged into a crowd of Iraqi officials and U.S. forces gathered for a meeting north of Baghdad yesterday, killing as many as 12 people, including an American soldier. It was one of three attacks nationwide that shattered the peaceful start of the Muslim holiday Eid al-Adha, which began Wednesday for Sunni Muslims. Shiites begin celebrating the four-day holiday today. The violence underscored what a U.S. official called the "great security threats" still looming in Iraq, threats illustrated by two recent discoveries.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 3, 2004
EL-BIREH, West Bank - They came not in a procession but in a trickle, each family standing over the grave of a lost loved one, offering prayers and paying their respects. The families were in a cemetery yesterday where Palestinians in the Ramallah area who are killed fighting Israelis are laid to rest, and visiting their graves has become an important part of celebrating Eid al-Adha, the Feast of the Sacrifice. The three-day feast, which concludes today and coincides with the end of Muslims' hajj, or pilgrimage, to Mecca in Saudi Arabia, commemorates Abraham offering his son as a sacrifice to God, who upon seeing Abraham's commitment, spared the child.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,sun reporter | April 25, 2007
Flanked by her two young daughters, Nazma Khan-Edwards sat in the front row during last night's Baltimore County school board meeting to support a years-long push to close schools for Muslim holidays. Her girls, 11-year-old Shazia and 6-year-old Elyse, needed to be there, she said, so that they could see fellow Muslims standing up for themselves. "We Muslims have to hold our heads high," said Khan-Edwards, whose family emigrated from Bangladesh in 1977. "It's important for my kids to be recognized for what they are. It's important for us to have the Muslim holidays off to celebrate with our families.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,Sun Reporter | April 23, 2007
Bash Pharoan sees his long-running campaign to close Baltimore County's schools on Muslim holidays as a demand for fairness: If schools are shut down on Yom Kippur and Christmas Day, they also should be closed on Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha. He first advanced this idea a decade ago, and despite significant obstacles - including state law that prohibits schools from closing solely for religious reasons - he has not backed off. In his latest push, Pharoan e-mailed about 250 area Muslims to encourage them to attend tomorrow's county school board meeting.
NEWS
May 15, 2005
MUSLIM PARENTS and community leaders have asked the Baltimore County school board to recognize two Muslim high holy days as countywide school holidays. With the backing of the Maryland State Board of Education, the school board has refused - at least during the next two school years. Given the premium on school instruction days and the fact that the system allows for excused absences when any student wishes to observe a religious holiday, the school board's position is reasonable. While about 44 percent of Baltimore County students are identified as racial minorities, school officials don't know the breakdown by religious affiliation.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2005
The Baltimore County school system has proposed a calendar for the 2006-2007 academic year that does not include days off for the two most religious Muslim holidays, despite more than a year of lobbying by the Muslim community. The proposed calendar, which does include a day off for the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur, will be presented to the school board tonight. The board is scheduled to vote on the proposal next month. Bash Pharoan, president of the Baltimore County Muslim Council, said he would continue fighting for the schools to close for Muslim holidays.
NEWS
January 28, 2005
TOWSON - Baltimore County schools Superintendent Joe A. Hairston said this week that he will appoint a task force to study how the school system creates its calendar. Hairston is responding to a request from school board member Michael P. Kennedy, who said at a board meeting Tuesday night that he wants to find common ground with the county's Muslim community. For the past year, the Muslim community has been lobbying the board to close school on its two most important holidays, Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2004
Ignoring pleas from members of the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee, the Baltimore County school board unanimously approved last night a 2005-2006 school year calendar that excludes two important Muslim holidays. Several board members who spoke before the vote said they realized the county's population is multicultural, but they would not vote to change the calendar. "More than usual, this year has been a great learning experience for this board," said member Jean M.H. Jung.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1996
Sumanayah El-Sheikh stood yesterday on a hill overlooking her mosque in Catonsville and stared down at the 2,000 people who had gathered there for one of the most important Muslim holidays of the year.Smiling, she pointed out clusters of Egyptians hugging Sudanese and Pakistanis kissing African-Americans on the cheek.It is that show of unity, she explains that marks the Eid-Ul-Adha, the holiday of sacrifice. It is one of the most significant Muslim holidays of the year and Ms. El-Sheikh's favorite.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,Sun Reporter | April 23, 2007
Bash Pharoan sees his long-running campaign to close Baltimore County's schools on Muslim holidays as a demand for fairness: If schools are shut down on Yom Kippur and Christmas Day, they also should be closed on Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha. He first advanced this idea a decade ago, and despite significant obstacles - including state law that prohibits schools from closing solely for religious reasons - he has not backed off. In his latest push, Pharoan e-mailed about 250 area Muslims to encourage them to attend tomorrow's county school board meeting.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 3, 2004
EL-BIREH, West Bank - They came not in a procession but in a trickle, each family standing over the grave of a lost loved one, offering prayers and paying their respects. The families were in a cemetery yesterday where Palestinians in the Ramallah area who are killed fighting Israelis are laid to rest, and visiting their graves has become an important part of celebrating Eid al-Adha, the Feast of the Sacrifice. The three-day feast, which concludes today and coincides with the end of Muslims' hajj, or pilgrimage, to Mecca in Saudi Arabia, commemorates Abraham offering his son as a sacrifice to God, who upon seeing Abraham's commitment, spared the child.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1996
Sumanayah El-Sheikh stood yesterday on a hill overlooking her mosque in Catonsville and stared down at the 2,000 people who had gathered there for one of the most important Muslim holidays of the year.Smiling, she pointed out clusters of Egyptians hugging Sudanese and Pakistanis kissing African-Americans on the cheek.It is that show of unity, she explains that marks the Eid-Ul-Adha, the holiday of sacrifice. It is one of the most significant Muslim holidays of the year and Ms. El-Sheikh's favorite.
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