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By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1999
The leader of one of the nation's largest Muslim groups will speak about moral leadership and urban renewal tomorrow at the Baltimore Convention Center.Wallace D. Mohammed is expected to discuss his attempts to establish Muslim communities across the country, including one in West Baltimore, and his group's use of such model communities to revive decaying inner-city neighborhoods.The speech begins at 2 p.m. Admission is free.Mohammed, the head of the Muslim American Society and son of the late Nation of Islam founder Elijah Mohammed, succeeded his father in 1975, but disbanded the Nation of Islam organization, which had become known for preaching black nationalism.
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2000
For years, Roman Catholic leaders have forged warm and friendly ties with Imam W. Deen Mohammed, leader of the Chicago-based Muslim American Society, the nation's largest body of African-American Muslims. Mohammed has become a friend of Baltimore Cardinal William H. Keeler, who in 1996 escorted the son of the late Nation of Islam leader Elijah Muhammad to Rome to meet Pope John Paul II. The next year, Mohammed invited Chiara Lubich, founder of Focolare, a worldwide lay spiritual movement of 2 million Catholics, to speak at Harlem's Malcolm Shabazz Mosque.
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NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 13, 1999
A branch of one of the country's largest Muslim factions plans to establish a religious community in Baltimore -- and has selected the Walbrook neighborhood as its new home.Imam E. Abdulmalik Mohammed, leader of the Muslim American Society of Baltimore, part of the Muslim American Society, said he envisions part of Walbrook becoming a majority Muslim community in five to 10 years."We want to influence the social and cultural life in the community," Mohammed said. "We hope to influence the area with language so people see a better picture of their lives."
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1999
The leader of the nation's largest Islamic body outlined a vision yesterday of self-sufficient Muslim community centers that would improve life in U.S. cities as their residents reach out to people of other races and faiths."
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1999
The leader of the nation's largest Islamic body outlined a vision yesterday of self-sufficient Muslim community centers that would improve life in U.S. cities as their residents reach out to people of other races and faiths."
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1998
Wallace D. Mohammed, leader of the Muslim American Society and son of the late Elijah Muhammad, said yesterday it is the duty of Muslims not only to respect their Christian and Jewish brothers and sisters, but to defend them, if necessary.In a speech to about 50 religious and civic leaders, Mohammed spoke of the racial and religious reconciliation he has emphasized repeatedly since he succeeded his father in 1975 and moved the denomination toward orthodox Sunni Islam."We are to respect religion and to respect the sacredness and the sacred things of religion, and even be ourselves committed to protect these things with our own hands and our own lives," he said in the address at the Baltimore Rowing Club in Cherry Hill.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2000
For years, Roman Catholic leaders have forged warm and friendly ties with Imam W. Deen Mohammed, leader of the Chicago-based Muslim American Society, the nation's largest body of African-American Muslims. Mohammed has become a friend of Baltimore Cardinal William H. Keeler, who in 1996 escorted the son of the late Nation of Islam leader Elijah Muhammad to Rome to meet Pope John Paul II. The next year, Mohammed invited Chiara Lubich, founder of Focolare, a worldwide lay spiritual movement of 2 million Catholics, to speak at Harlem's Malcolm Shabazz Mosque.
NEWS
By From staff reports | March 13, 1999
In Baltimore City Keeler, Muslim leader urge U.S. to sign anti-mine pact Cardinal William H. Keeler joined Imam E. Abdulmalik Mohammed, leader of the Muslim American Society of Baltimore, yesterday in calling on the United States to sign the Ottawa Convention, which bans the production, use and export of anti-personnel mines. Keeler appeared at a news conference at the Muslim Community Culture Center in Walbrook. The treaty has been signed by 133 countries, but several major users, including the United States, Russia and China, have refused.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1997
In his first news conference as leader of one of Baltimore's largest Muslim communities, Imam E. Abdul-malik Mohammed said yesterday that he wants to develop strong ties with all of the city's religious leaders while building a thriving Islamic community."
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 6, 2000
IMAM E. Abdulmalik Mohammed, the young leader of the Muslim American Society in Baltimore, noticed something missing in the large gathering of Muslims inside Chicago's United Center last week. There were no pictures of Elijah Muhammad, the founder of the Nation of Islam, and none of the "black god," W.D. Farad. Black-and-white images of those men were always standard at the Nation of Islam's most important annual meeting, Saviour's Day. But not this Saviour's Day. Abdulmalik noticed something else.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1999
The leader of one of the nation's largest Muslim groups will speak about moral leadership and urban renewal tomorrow at the Baltimore Convention Center.Wallace D. Mohammed is expected to discuss his attempts to establish Muslim communities across the country, including one in West Baltimore, and his group's use of such model communities to revive decaying inner-city neighborhoods.The speech begins at 2 p.m. Admission is free.Mohammed, the head of the Muslim American Society and son of the late Nation of Islam founder Elijah Mohammed, succeeded his father in 1975, but disbanded the Nation of Islam organization, which had become known for preaching black nationalism.
NEWS
By From staff reports | March 13, 1999
In Baltimore City Keeler, Muslim leader urge U.S. to sign anti-mine pact Cardinal William H. Keeler joined Imam E. Abdulmalik Mohammed, leader of the Muslim American Society of Baltimore, yesterday in calling on the United States to sign the Ottawa Convention, which bans the production, use and export of anti-personnel mines. Keeler appeared at a news conference at the Muslim Community Culture Center in Walbrook. The treaty has been signed by 133 countries, but several major users, including the United States, Russia and China, have refused.
NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 13, 1999
A branch of one of the country's largest Muslim factions plans to establish a religious community in Baltimore -- and has selected the Walbrook neighborhood as its new home.Imam E. Abdulmalik Mohammed, leader of the Muslim American Society of Baltimore, part of the Muslim American Society, said he envisions part of Walbrook becoming a majority Muslim community in five to 10 years."We want to influence the social and cultural life in the community," Mohammed said. "We hope to influence the area with language so people see a better picture of their lives."
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1998
Wallace D. Mohammed, leader of the Muslim American Society and son of the late Elijah Muhammad, said yesterday it is the duty of Muslims not only to respect their Christian and Jewish brothers and sisters, but to defend them, if necessary.In a speech to about 50 religious and civic leaders, Mohammed spoke of the racial and religious reconciliation he has emphasized repeatedly since he succeeded his father in 1975 and moved the denomination toward orthodox Sunni Islam."We are to respect religion and to respect the sacredness and the sacred things of religion, and even be ourselves committed to protect these things with our own hands and our own lives," he said in the address at the Baltimore Rowing Club in Cherry Hill.
NEWS
April 17, 2002
THE ELDERLY woman stood in the parking lot of the post office on Dolfield Avenue, looking across the way at the throng of people entering, leaving and standing outside the March Funeral Home. The numbers must have been in the hundreds. March's parking lot had long ago been filled, leaving those who wanted to attend the services the option of parking along Wabash Avenue. Some swung around to Dolfield, prompting a minor traffic jam on this unusually warm April afternoon along this usually low-traffic street.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2002
Eric El-Amin, a religious activist, community leader and former policy adviser in the Baltimore City Health Department, died Friday of a liver ailment at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Woodlawn resident was 47 Mr. El-Amin was a devoted member of the Muslim American Society, and worked for many years on the public relations staff of Imam W. Deen Muhammed, leader of the religious group. In recent years, he traveled with Muslim-American delegations that met with Pope John Paul II, Patriarch Bartholomew I of the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Grand Mufti of Syria.
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