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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
The gang at the Corner BYOB is getting ready for its second Gastronaut Society dinner, scheduled for Tuesday, Jan. 17. On the menu this time -- python, razor clams, muskrat, duck tongue, wreckfish and antelope fillet stuffed with foie gras. The Jan. 17 Gastronaut Society dinner is $125 and $95 for Gastronaut Society members. Members get first notice of the dinners, which Cecile Fenix over at Corner BYOB tells me fill up pretty fast. For information about joining the Gastronaut Society, send an email to meetme@cornerbyob.com.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick,
The Baltimore Sun
| April 24, 2013
If you caught the "Bizarre Foods" episode on Baltimore and the Chesapeake Bay, you'll remember Andrew Zimmern 's meeting muskrat-skinning champion Rhonda Aaron. Aaron was also featured in Amy Nicholson's 2005 documentary "Muskrat Lovely," which takes an inside look at the National Outdoor Show in Golden Hill, Dorchester County, where contestants compete in a muskrat-skinning competition. Local high school girls also compete to become "Miss Outdoors," the queen of the National Outdoor Show.
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NEWS
By David Zucchino and David Zucchino,Los Angeles Times | March 2, 2009
Golden Hill -How do you skin a muskrat? Let's ask an expert. Here's Dakota Abbott, 17, the only woman to win a muskrat-skinning contest and the Miss Outdoors Pageant. Her father and uncle, both former muskrat-skinning champs, taught her to skin her first muskrat when she was 14. "The first cut is crucial. You have to pinch the fur at the hind legs and cut straight into that meaty area there. You slice down and out real quick and just push your rat inside out," Abbott was saying Friday night as she watched three male cousins skin muskrats.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
The gang at the Corner BYOB is getting ready for its second Gastronaut Society dinner, scheduled for Tuesday, Jan. 17. On the menu this time -- python, razor clams, muskrat, duck tongue, wreckfish and antelope fillet stuffed with foie gras. The Jan. 17 Gastronaut Society dinner is $125 and $95 for Gastronaut Society members. Members get first notice of the dinners, which Cecile Fenix over at Corner BYOB tells me fill up pretty fast. For information about joining the Gastronaut Society, send an email to meetme@cornerbyob.com.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Special to The Sun | February 25, 1991
GOLDEN HILL -- It took two minutes and 25 bloody carcasses to enthrone Ted Abbott as king -- king of the muskrat skinners.This time it wasn't Wylie Abbott Sr. or Wiley Abbott Jr., who have been handing the big trophy back and forth since 1977. It was their cousin, Ted Abbott, a weekend trapper who claimed the honor by skinning five muskrats in a minute, 25 1/2 seconds at the 46th annual National Outdoor Show in Golden Hill on Saturday night.Ted Abbott, a home-renovation contractor from Fishing Creek in Dorchester County, had just come off a 10-year hiatus from the skinning wars.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | March 28, 1994
My calendar lists Passover, Palm Sunday, Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Easter all as falling within the space of eight days.These times of religious observance coincide neatly with the week when seasonal rebirth seems to crash through the doldrums of a long, cold and wet Baltimore winter.Look outside. Even in the pouring rains, a blush of yellow forsythia has burst forth in Preston Gardens downtown.Let the temperature rise above 48 and it seems that half the population under 20 is attired in Bermuda shorts.
NEWS
By Joe Forsthoffer and Joe Forsthoffer,Contributing Writer | February 15, 1993
BIVALVE -- "More rat!" comes the request."More rat coming up!" answers a voice from the kitchen, and a moment later a steaming bowl of muskrat joins the turkey and stuffing, sweet potatoes, greens, corn bread and steamed tomatoes making their way through the community hall of the Westside Volunteer Fire Department here.By 11:30 yesterday morning, a half-hour before the dinner was to start, folks were lined up and waiting for muskrat. By 5 p.m., an estimated crowd of 800 people had consumed 550 muskrats, 35 turkeys and vegetables by the bushel.
NEWS
By Vicki McClure and Vicki McClure,Knight Ridder/Tribune | March 19, 2000
LOWER ALLOWAYS CREEK, N.J. -- The attic of Harry Beal's fur barn stands mostly empty. About 400 muskrat skins hang from thin wooden slats built to hold 3,500. When he constructed the barn five years ago, he had hopes that New Jersey's flagging trapping industry would bounce back, and he could once again earn a living in a trade passed down to him from his father and grandfather. The 61-year-old trapper has now resigned himself to making what was once his livelihood into a hobby. And he has watched his friends make similar decisions.
NEWS
By Debbie Price and Debbie Price,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1997
VIENNA -- Donald Webster took the dead muskrat in his hands, pinched the fur above its hind legs, drew a quick slit with his pocketknife and set about rolling the pelt over the animal's head."
FEATURES
By Tracy Sahler and Tracy Sahler,Special to the Sun | February 24, 1999
Time is running out for those gourmets who have not yet tucked into a plate of tender, spicy muskrat this winter.Of course, that may not be high on most folks' list of things to do. While the dark-fleshed emu is the exotic darling of the decade, and some people can't seem to bite into enough bison, the meat of the muskrat, a semiaquatic rodent at home in the swamps and marshes of the Eastern Shore, just hasn't caught on.It doesn't help that those who have...
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2011
New York City has its descending ball. Miami Beach has its giant orange. And Princess Anne has its stuffed muskrat. At midnight Saturday, the town of 2,400 people in Somerset County will become the latest in a line of Maryland communities — and scores of towns across the country — to embrace a growing tradition: dropping a locally significant if less than elegant object from a great height as a way of welcoming the new year. "The muskrat is a part of our heritage, and we wanted to drop something relevant to us," said Ben Adler, director of the Princess Anne Main Street Partnership, one of the brains behind the plan.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2011
Sydney Wilner of Anne Arundel County asks: We have a mystery with no plausible solution: Who or what is stealing the bait from our crab traps? Not just mine, but my neighbors' and, we hear, all the way from South River to Mill Creek. Neighbors first suspected a human, but that's not possible considering the extent of the thievery. My next-door neighbor is convinced it's an otter or muskrat, but have you ever heard of a muskrat that can not only open the bait door, but also neatly close and strap the bungee cord back on?
NEWS
By David Zucchino and David Zucchino,Los Angeles Times | March 2, 2009
Golden Hill -How do you skin a muskrat? Let's ask an expert. Here's Dakota Abbott, 17, the only woman to win a muskrat-skinning contest and the Miss Outdoors Pageant. Her father and uncle, both former muskrat-skinning champs, taught her to skin her first muskrat when she was 14. "The first cut is crucial. You have to pinch the fur at the hind legs and cut straight into that meaty area there. You slice down and out real quick and just push your rat inside out," Abbott was saying Friday night as she watched three male cousins skin muskrats.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | February 10, 2009
Nobody asked me, but I'm pretty sure I saw raccoon for sale at Faidley's in Lexington Market the other day. I checked back with Bill Devine, the owner of the famous seafood stand, and he verified it: Raccoons are $19.98 each, and the marsh rabbit - muskrat - is selling for $7 each. It's the season for such victuals, and Devine still has customers for it, though not as many as he used to. "People who grew up eatin' it on the Eastern Shore," he says, describing the market for raccoon. "Or people who grew up in the Carolinas or Virginia."
NEWS
June 15, 2008
Sullivan Cove threatened by pier My family moved to Old County Road in Severna Park in 1958 and moved away in 1976. Each of my three brothers can probably tell a tale or two of some adventure that took place in or around the swamp near Sullivan Cove - muskrat hunting, losing shoes in the muck, seeing my first blue heron, ice skating on a connecting marshland. We would never have even considered building a pier across the swamp (The Sun, June 8). As kids, we would haul and dump logs to move from one pad of grass to another, but the damage to the swamp wrought by the construction of a pier can never be rectified.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | January 26, 2008
Late January might be high muskrat season, but don't ask me to touch one. In truth, I don't even like their skinned bodies when displayed on a bed of ice at the Lexington Market. I encountered this critter, which normally thrives in the Chesapeake's marshes, often on Saturdays in my childhood, when my mother rounded up her children and led us across 29th Street to Greenmount Avenue to board a No. 8 streetcar.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1996
Some say the Eastern Shore muskrat's meat tastes like liver. Others suggest the dark meat of turkey. Some insist it has a pot roast flavor. There also is a faction that claims it resembles venison. Others say terrapin.But nobody says it tastes like chicken.David Duvall, a 22-year-old Hurlock resident, has his own verdict: "To me, muskrat tastes like muskrat."Last weekend, the Eastern Shore Society of Baltimore -- 146 strong -- filed into the Tall Cedars of Lebanon Hall on Putty Hill Avenue in Parkville for a stag oyster roast.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2002
CAMBRIDGE - Got a taste for muskrat, a hankering for nutria, maybe a craving for raccoon? Then Roger Webster is your man. The third-generation grocer and his family have been making a living since 1939 catering to customers in the Dorchester County seat who like things done the old-fashioned way. And for many of Webster's regulars, this is the time of year when the mounds of deli meats, hamburger, chops and chicken that fill his meat case just won't...
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,sun reporter | February 24, 2007
BLACKWATER NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE -- This splendid stretch of mucky marshland along the Blackwater River is Ted Abbott's winter domain, a remote sanctuary that never fails to deliver a dose of frigid solitude that is his idea of a vacation. Abbott, a muskrat trapper for most of his 67 years, revels in the stillness he shares with his prey - an unseen army of furry nocturnal rodents that paw through a maze of flooded tunnels, pausing to raise their heads to breathe amid Blackwater's brackish rivulets.
NEWS
July 27, 2006
From Dogtown, Ala., to Camel Hump, Wyo., the United States is filled with place names that are neither lofty nor swanky. Some communities wear their gritty sobriquets with pride, refusing to hide their bare-knuckled origins behind scented veils of gentrification. Others, afraid that outsiders will mock them, surrender to trendy pretension. For example, the little Eastern Shore town of St. Michaels - lately a weekend getaway for the Cheneys and the Rumsfelds - declared that a patch of public waterfront property should be named Church Cove Park.
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