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By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2011
Kenny Files said he "knew I had something" when he felt more than a little tug on his fishing line April 14 in the flood-swollen Potomac River near Williamsport in Washington County. Files, who was 12 at the time and has been fishing since "I was 3 or 4" pulled in a 31.75-pound muskie after casting a large white plastic grub lure. It turned out to be the state record. Files' father, Ken, said he was a bit surprised at his son's big haul. He had been fishing the same waters across from their home Falling Waters, W.Va., and had not caught anything bigger than a 9 1/2- pound largemouth bass at their regular fishing spot.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2011
Kenny Files said he "knew I had something" when he felt more than a little tug on his fishing line April 14 in the flood-swollen Potomac River near Williamsport in Washington County. Files, who was 12 at the time and has been fishing since "I was 3 or 4" pulled in a 31.75-pound muskie after casting a large white plastic grub lure. It turned out to be the state record. Files' father, Ken, said he was a bit surprised at his son's big haul. He had been fishing the same waters across from their home Falling Waters, W.Va., and had not caught anything bigger than a 9 1/2- pound largemouth bass at their regular fishing spot.
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SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | March 8, 1998
The Potomac River above Great Falls long has been an excellent place to fish for bass in all seasons, especially for smallmouths, which many fishermen say outfight largemouths, pound for pound.But along the same stretch of river above the fall line, a relative newcomer, the tiger muskie, is making its mark in a fishery well known for its quality and quantity of black bass."Tiger muskie have a different, larger body type than bass," DNR fisheries biologist John Mullican said last week. "They make quick, ambush strikes and they put up a short but spectacular fight."
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2011
As Maryland lawmakers debated the gay marriage bill, and Del. Luke Clippinger came out to colleagues on the House floor, one of his fellow Baltimore Democrats was moved to tears. "My colleague Luke, I sit right next to him, enduring all these weeks of negativity, for him to finally speak out and say why he's in favor of it, what it means to him, it just got emotional," Del. Keiffer Mitchell told me. There's another reason the gay marriage debate hit home for Mitchell. His own marriage would have been illegal until 1967, the year he was born, because Mitchell is black and his wife is white.
SPORTS
By Lonny Weaver and Lonny Weaver,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 10, 1996
March is probably the best time for Carroll fishing fans to catch a tiger muskellunge from the nearby Potomac River. You will find them at the mouths of the larger feeder streams and rivers that flow into the Potomac as these sharp-toothed trophies feed on suckers.Maryland began stocking hybrid tiger muskies in the mid and upper Potomac in 1989 by crossing male northern pike with female true muskellunge. The result is an extremely aggressive fish of large size with little or no reproductive capacity.
SPORTS
By Bill Burton | June 25, 1991
OAKLAND -- A 5 1/2 -pound largemouth bass is nothing to sneeze at, but for Tom Meadows it wasn't the highlight of his fishing at 200-acre Broadford Lake the other morning. He was more excited about the one that got away.And, the "one" wasn't a bass. It was a tiger muskie, which he caught and promptly lost.After taking the 20 3/4-inch bass on a purple plastic worm with green flake, Meadows switched to a sppiner-bait, hooked the muskie-and it came stright toward him. Meadows yanked and the fish came ashore, he reeled wildly to get in the excess line, the fish threw the hook, and splashed back into Broadford.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | March 29, 1996
WASHINGTON -- For all of Sen. Edmund Muskie's considerable accomplishments, his death brought renewed reminiscences of his unsuccessful presidential bid in 1972 and the single incident to which its outcome was often attributed.News reports captured Mr. Muskie standing outside the Manchester Union Leader in a snowstorm during the 1972 New Hampshire primary and momentarily losing his composure over personal attacks in the newspaper on his wife, Jane. Debatable even today is whether, as many wrote, Mr. Muskie had wept, or whether it was melted snow rather than tears that trickled down his cheek as he spoke in mixed anger and sorrow.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | May 12, 1991
When it comes to the politics of vice presidential choices, I wrote the book. In fact I wrote two books. Well, make that one and a half.In 1968, I spent 10 weeks as a reporter for The Sun covering the campaign of Democratic vice presidential candidate Edmund Muskie. I took two short leaves from that assignment to cover the vice presidential campaign of the Republican candidate, Spiro T. Agnew, while The Sun man assigned to the Agnew campaign, Gene Oishi, came onto the Muskie plane.Subsequently I wrote biographies of both men. "Muskie," written in collaboration with Portland Press Herald political editor Don Hansen, came out in 1971.
NEWS
January 6, 1993
WARREN Christopher's selection as the next secretary o State sent us scurrying to our Carter administration bookshelf to see what his colleagues of the 1977-81 period had to say about him. He served throughout as deputy secretary, first under Cyrus Vance, then under Edmund Muskie.President Carter, in his memoirs, made the tantalizing comment that Mr. Christopher was "the best public servant I ever knew." Unfortunately, he did not elaborate.Zbigniew Brzezinski, who as national security adviser was constantly at war with Foggy Bottom, recalled that President Carter felt Mr. Vance was useful in reining in the "activists" in the White House.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1997
IT TURNS 25 this month, a most impressive offspring of the modern environmental age, yet nowhere near fulfilling its promise.Congress in 1972 passed the federal Clean Water Act over howls and threats from the industrial establishment, amid warnings from New York Gov. Nelson Rockefeller that it was a "$3 trillion mistake."Congress passed it again, handily, over President Richard Nixon's veto, and waited for the Supreme Court to strike down his impoundment of $18 billion in the act to help states treat sewage.
NEWS
December 18, 2010
The year was 1964 when a future Sun editorial writer stood outside Randle Highlands Elementary School in Southeast D.C. with tears streaming down his cheeks as if a leaky tap had been bolted to his head. The boy did not wish to cry. He didn't feel particularly sad or hurt, the normal reasons why a 5-year-old would be tearing up. But it was the first day of school, the first day entirely on his own without a parent nearby, and what is etched most deeply in his memory of the day is the embarrassment of being seen by his peers as a cry-baby.
TOPIC
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 14, 2002
A headline in The Sun on Tuesday -- "The right to say whatever the @%#&! you want" -- recalled for me two encounters with vulgarity back in the decade that the dirty speech movement began. In the summer of 1963, I was the Washington correspondent for the Atlanta Constitution. Washington was girding itself for the "March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom." That event was meant to pressure the federal government to pass civil rights legislation. It was where Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I have a dream" speech.
NEWS
By Lisa W. Foderaro and Lisa W. Foderaro,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 17, 2001
BUFFALO - Theories abound as to why skunks are suddenly sweet on Buffalo. The skunks arrived after being displaced from once-pastoral towns in the grip of a building boom at the city's border. They started pawing garbage cans when railroad tracks in the city were torn up to make way for housing - or was it when a former dog food plant was torn down? Others say it's the raccoons, arguing that a recent drop in the raccoon population paved the way for skunks. Frank L. Poincelot, the head pest control and wildlife officer for the city of Buffalo, who once had a pet skunk named Herbie, acknowledges all of the above.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | February 4, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The first order of business for Gov. George W. Bush in the next two Republican primaries -- in Delaware on Tuesday and in South Carolina on Feb. 19 -- is to restore the "inevitability" of his nomination so shaken by Sen. John McCain in New Hampshire. On paper, he has the stuff to do it -- a huge advantage in money and the party establishment leadership in both states. But he had both the bucks and the party bodies in the Granite State, and they weren't nearly enough to save him from the avalanche that buried him in the snowy north.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | October 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- It is a mistake to read too much into the endorsements politicians collect from other politicians. Most voters are not as impressed as the politicians might imagine.But Al Gore can draw some encouragement from the declaration of support he has received from Gov. Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire. She is a popular Democrat who has demonstrated a strong appeal to independents, a voting bloc that opinion polls show has been leaning strongly toward Bill Bradley.The timing of the endorsement suggests, however, that the Gore campaign is reacting defensively.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | November 16, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The surprising Republican loss of five House seats in the off-year congressional elections is having more ramifications than House Speaker Newt Gingrich's decision to jump before he was pushed out of his leadership post.On the Democratic side, advisers to House Minority Leader Richard Gephardt are reporting that the narrowed GOP majority of 12 seats in the House is causing Mr. Gephardt to give new thought to whether he really wants to challenge Vice President Al Gore for their party's presidential nomination in 2000.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | November 16, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The surprising Republican loss of five House seats in the off-year congressional elections is having more ramifications than House Speaker Newt Gingrich's decision to jump before he was pushed out of his leadership post.On the Democratic side, advisers to House Minority Leader Richard Gephardt are reporting that the narrowed GOP majority of 12 seats in the House is causing Mr. Gephardt to give new thought to whether he really wants to challenge Vice President Al Gore for their party's presidential nomination in 2000.
TOPIC
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 14, 2002
A headline in The Sun on Tuesday -- "The right to say whatever the @%#&! you want" -- recalled for me two encounters with vulgarity back in the decade that the dirty speech movement began. In the summer of 1963, I was the Washington correspondent for the Atlanta Constitution. Washington was girding itself for the "March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom." That event was meant to pressure the federal government to pass civil rights legislation. It was where Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I have a dream" speech.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | March 8, 1998
The Potomac River above Great Falls long has been an excellent place to fish for bass in all seasons, especially for smallmouths, which many fishermen say outfight largemouths, pound for pound.But along the same stretch of river above the fall line, a relative newcomer, the tiger muskie, is making its mark in a fishery well known for its quality and quantity of black bass."Tiger muskie have a different, larger body type than bass," DNR fisheries biologist John Mullican said last week. "They make quick, ambush strikes and they put up a short but spectacular fight."
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