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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
A Parkville musician was so filled with emotion following the shooting of a Perry Hall High School special education student that he wrote a song. Greg Wimmer posted his tribute, "Daniel, We Pray," online, and not only has it already been circulating widely through social media, the victim's pastor played it during a church service this weekend. Daniel Borowy, 17, a special education student, was shot last week on the first day of school. He's been hospitalized since in critical condition, though he is expected to survive.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Hilary Hahn and Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
When we talk about music, we tend to place our experiences into one of two categories: making the music and listening to it. Delineating the two seems practical and obvious. In reality, though, there are a lot of opportunities for overlap, and it doesn't matter how you get into the music as long as you connect with it. Here are some approaches to try. Immerse I love performing. The sounds coming at me are dynamic, colorful and multi-layered. The energy from the musicians around me and from the audience is a swirl of excitement.
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FEATURES
By Suzanna Stephens and Suzanna Stephens,Contributing Writer | February 8, 1995
As the world's only full-time, classical percussion-soloist, Scottish-born Evelyn Glennie bewitches audiences worldwide with her talent. And this weekend, as a featured soloist with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Ms. Glennie is expected to mesmerize Baltimore as well.Ms. Glennie is respected among some of the world's most heralded musicians as a percussionist of great skill. Yet what seems to fascinate those who first learn about her is that Ms. Glennie cannot hear. By age 10, she had lost all hearing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
The gunners at Fort McHenry readied the 3-ton cannon known as Messenger, heaving it into position behind a wooden wall with a block-and-rope pulley system and loading it with gunpowder and a substitute cannonball of peat moss. The call came: "Clear!" and the gunners stepped to the side, with one touching a slow match to the gunpowder inside the cannon. The boom rocked the air and echoed across Baltimore's harbor as a geyser of fire and smoke poured from the cannon's mouth. Park ranger Tyler Mink said the first time he set off a cannon, the experience was "a little nerve-racking.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1996
Albert Sigismondi, a musician who played in numerous local bands and was president of the local guild for area musicians for 10 years, died Thursday of kidney failure at Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center and Hospital. He was 75.Mr. Sigismondi of Pikesville once said that his beloved saxophone and clarinet were "all I need for my bread and butter." He played with area bands at weddings, parties and bar mitzvahs for nearly four decades."He was equally at home playing in a jazz group, show band and or a Dixieland band," said Jack Hook, a musician and long-time friend.
NEWS
November 15, 1990
Services for Irvin N. Dashiells, a musician and retired jewelry salesman, will be held at 11 a.m. today at the Leroy M. and Russell C. Witzke Funeral Home, 1630 Edmondson Ave., Catonsville.Mr. Dashiells, who was 78, died of cancer Monday at his home on Hartmont Road in the Catonsville area.He retired in 1974 after many years of selling jewelry, which he would take to customers' homes.He taught music, played saxophone and led bands after being certified as a saxophone teacher by the Kaspar School of Music while still in his teens.
NEWS
December 22, 1990
Services for Carroll M. Roby, a tenor soloist, drummer and band leader who operated a moving business before retiring about five years ago, will be held at 10 a.m. today at the McCully Funeral Home, Mountain and Tickneck roads in Pasadena.Mr. Roby, who was 85 and lived on Locust Road on the shore of Bodkin Creek, died Wednesday of heart failure at North Arundel Hospital.He once owned Roby Moving Co., which he started in 1928.A native of Baltimore and a graduate of Southern High School, he was a drummer and vocalist for other band leaders and led bands from the 1920s until a little more than five years ago.His bands played at social events in the Baltimore-Washington area and performed on the Old Bay Line ships and at nightclubs, including Miller's Supper Club.
NEWS
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | February 5, 2006
Vaughan Mason's personalized license plate displays his lifelong credo for success: "FAILURE." Before you raise a jaundiced eye, keep in mind that he's a musician who is still getting paid for work he did in the 1970s and '80s. And if you were part of the nightclub or roller-skating scene then, chances are you're familiar with one of his efforts: Bounce. Roccccccccccccccck. Skate. Rolllllllllllllllllllllll. Bounce. It's been almost 27 years since Mason recorded the pulsating ode to roller-skating, "Bounce, Rock, Skate, Roll," which took him from living on the sofa of a friend's brownstone apartment in Brooklyn (five houses down from Spike Lee, no less)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | August 19, 2009
William M. Reid, a former educator and musician, died of multiple organ failure Thursday at Sinai Hospital. The Columbia resident was 84. Mr.Reid was born and raised in Hampton, Va., where he graduated from George P. Phenix Elementary-High School. His college studies at Hampton Institute were interrupted when he was drafted into the Army in 1943. After serving for three years in the Army Band, he continued his college education at Hampton, where he earned a bachelor's degree in music in 1950.
NEWS
May 1, 2003
Marcia W. Smith, a homemaker and musician, died Monday of stroke complications at Oak Crest Village in Parkville. The former Towson resident was 87. Born in New Philadelphia, Ohio, Marcia W. Kaser attended New Philadelphia public schools. She moved to Baltimore in the early 1940s. She was a part-time food services cashier at what is now Towson University before her retirement in the late 1970s. She sang with the Towson University Glee Club. Family members said she was an advocate for mentally challenged children and adults.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Verna Mae Peacock Cann, a retired social worker and church musician, died of congestive heart failure Aug. 27 at Sinai Hospital. The Parkton resident was 81. Born Verna Mae Peacock in Durham, N.C., she was the daughter of James Otis Peacock and Christine Smith Peacock. She attended Durham public schools and the Mary Potter Academy, a boarding school, before she moved to Baltimore at age 16. She completed adult evening school at City College. She also had an associate of arts degree from Baltimore City Community College.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2014
When Shirlé Hale-Koslowski tells people what she does for a living, she is often greeted with a blank stare. She is the owner and sole employee of Four Corners Cuisine, a Baltimore-based private chef service Hale-Koslowski operates out of the kitchens of her 10 clients. People have heard of personal chefs for the rich and famous, she says, but she caters to the middle class, not the multimillionaire. Each meal - groceries and labor included - averages $10 to $12 and includes an entree and a side.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Musicians will sing and strum and play the harmonica Thursday night in Annapolis night to raise funds - and awareness - for Lyme disease. Headlining the Ticked Off Music Fest will be Les Stroud, a TV survivalist and musician from Canada. He'll be joined by two musicians who survived Lyme disease and a lawyer-singer-songwriter from Annapolis. "My hope is to bring awareness to Anne Arundel County about the dangers of tick-borne diseases," said Karen Owen, a fitness instructor and mother from the Broadneck community who is organizing the concert.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
A one-of-a-kind oboe belonging to a musician with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra was reportedly stolen outside a Montreal hotel Tuesday morning. With the BSO season starting in less than a month, she's anxious to get it back. “We all are very wedded to these instruments,” said Katherine Needleman, principal oboist for the BSO. “It's very special to me. It's the only one like it.” Needleman said the oboe was a prototype, made by Yamaha while she was working with the company in developing a new model.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Music's communicative power - "such sweet compulsion," Milton called it - has been known to change lives. Hearing the right piece at the right time can make a person start to think and feel differently, maybe start down a new path. In a thoroughly unscientific sampling, members of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and other classical musicians who perform regularly in the area were asked to talk about the first works that caught their ears and hearts and have continued to inspire them.
NEWS
July 22, 2014
I just read Susan Reimer 's wonderful column in The Baltimore Sun and it took me back through the past six months to relive the amazing experience my son Thomas and the boys have been through ("Collabro hits all the right notes," July 19). It has been one hell of a roller coaster ride, ups and downs, twists and turns and it's all still crazy and go, go, go for the boys. I can't tell you how proud I am of Thomas and I know all the other boys have tremendous support from their families.
NEWS
April 20, 2004
Jason Patrick Heeney, a chef and musician, died in an automobile accident Wednesday in Annapolis. The Glen Burnie resident was 22. Mr. Heeney was a passenger in a Honda that struck a telephone pole at Bay Ridge Avenue and Bank Street. Mr. Heeney and the driver, Ryan James Wiseley, 21, also of Annapolis, were pronounced dead at the scene. Born and raised in Annapolis, Mr. Heeney was a 2000 graduate of Annapolis High School. "He started out working as a door guard and waiter and later moved up to cooking at Riordan's in Annapolis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Four instruments fashioned from magnets and turntables and thick metal springs are conversing in a gallery of the Walters Art Museum . They pop and hum, plink like the teeth of a comb. One calls to mind an amplified heartbeat. Another sounds like someone far away brushing a drum head. Like drunken guests at a party, their tones blend, then break into discordant sounds. One bellows at unexpected intervals. "These are idiosyncratic machines," says their creator, artist and musician Neil Feather.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cassidy Sterling | May 13, 2014
At Sunday's Art Outside event, local artists and crafters will gather at Druid Hill Park in a revival of sorts of the city's free al-fresco community art festivals of the 1950s and 1960s. Among the artists will be 28-year-old Brian Behm, also a designer and musician, who returns for the second year to Art Outside (11 a.m.-5 p.m.; artoutsidemd.org ). Behm, who lives in Windsor Hills, said he will showcase some of his large-scale paintings at Art Outside, but will also have for sale some pieces he has been working on recently - sunset scenery and city skyline paintings (go to briancbehm.com for more information)
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