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Musical Theater

FEATURES
By Karin Remesch | April 24, 2000
National Theatre. "Rent." Open auditions for the Broadway production and all its touring companies. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday at the theater, 1321 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington. Needed are men and women of all ethnicities in their early to mid-20s. Take photo and resume. Prepare 16 bars of up-beat pop/rock/gospel music to sing without piano (no musical theater or country music songs). Call 212-479-0833. Open Space Arts. "Giant Puppet Pageant." Needed are actors, puppeteers, stage hands.
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NEWS
By Cheryl Clemens | June 10, 2014
Forget popsicle-stick art and freeze tag. So many of today's summer camps are unique, a camper could spend every week of the summer at a new one and never repeat an activity. Over the next three months, Howard County Recreation and Parks will hold more than 300 camps for toddlers to teenagers ranging in themes from rock climbing, chess and musical theater to skate boarding, robotics and cooking. More than 13,000 campers are expected to register this year, more than a third of the county's camps already had waiting lists by early May. “It can be hard to keep up with the demand,” said Dawn Thomas, the county's adventure, nature and outdoor recreation manager.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | March 26, 2013
There was plenty to celebrate when the Howard County Arts Council held its 16th annual Celebration of the Arts. Besides the awards handed out in various categories, there was an announcement that wasn't on the scheduled program for this festive event held Saturday, March 23 at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. Addressing the well-dressed crowd of arts advocates, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman said: "It's time to have a wonderful, state of the art, 21st-century arts center here in Howard County.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | March 17, 2005
Musical theater results from a mysterious stage alchemy in which the finished product somehow is greater than the sum of its parts. You'll find more beautiful music in a symphony or your favorite band; a more engrossing story in a middling novel; and more elegant dancing in any ballet troupe. Somehow, it doesn't matter. We still flock in droves to musicals like Oklahoma! (currently at the Hippodrome Theatre for a two-week run) and pay dearly for the privilege. The secret appeal of musical theater may be its emotional transparency and immediacy - a quality that alternately entrances and embarrasses theatergoers, depending on their individual predilections.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | October 19, 2003
They are people who play roles for a living. So, in a very real sense, they're actors. Their job is to draw people in and put something over on them. Sometimes they even sing for their suppers. No wonder con artists are such popular subjects for musicals. Think of The Music Man's "Professor" Harold Hill convincing the citizens of a small Iowa town that he can turn their miscreant sons into a melodious boys' band. Or The Producers' Max Bialystock and Leo Bloom hoodwinking scores of lovestruck little old ladies into investing in what the producers are convinced will be a surefire Broadway flop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2012
She isn't quite 5 feet tall, but Kristin Chenoweth has achieved uncommon stature in show business, thanks to consistently sizzling performances on Broadway, including an indelible portrayal of Glinda in "Wicked"that earned her a Tony nomination, and several television shows. With just the slightest touch of hyperbole, "Glee"actor Chris Colfer neatly expressed Chenoweth's appeal after her guest appearance on that series, telling the Los Angeles Times that "working with Kristin is what I can imagine what a priest would go through if he worked with Jesus.
NEWS
July 20, 2012
Musical workshop for teens The Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre is accepting applications for its teen workshop. It explores drama and vocal skills, monologues, cold readings, audition techniques and various styles of dance. Through theater games, scene work, movement, improvisation and imagination, participants will gain a better understanding of the art of musical theater. The session runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 6-10 with a final rehearsal 5 p.m.-10 p.m. Aug. 13. The workshop culminates in a Broadway-style musical revue with final performances at 8:30 p.m. Aug. 14-15.
NEWS
February 22, 2009
Community gardening plots available in spring The Howard County Economic Development Authority's Agricultural Marketing Program has announced that the Howard County Conservancy will break ground for a community garden this spring. The conservancy's 63 garden plots are available to rent for $40. The plots are 20 feet by 25 feet. A pollinator garden will attract beneficial insects and wildlife. Deer fencing, water and compost bins will be provided. Gardens are to be pesticide-free, and Bay Wise gardening techniques will be encouraged.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | June 20, 1991
Stephens Hall, the impressive Victorian building facing York Road on the Towson State University campus, and its theater have undergone a complete renovation making the 75-year-old building a state-of-the-art facility.Polished birch wood accents the original turn-of-the-century stylthe remodeled theater. A gala featuring an invitation-only performance of TSU's Maryland Arts Festival production of "West Side Story," directed by Ken Urmston, will be held in the theater Saturday evening. The occasion also commemorates the anniversary of Towson State University.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | November 23, 1990
"Motown 30: What's Going On" is much, much more than a celebration of the three-plus decades of this record label -- it is at once a variety show as old-fashioned as Ed Sullivan, and on the cutting edge as much as Keenan Ivory Wayans.But more importantly, producers Suzanne DePasse and Don Mischer have built this show around a theme -- the demonstration of how, during the last four decades, African-American contributions to the arts moved from the marginal to the mainstream, from the street corners of the do-wop singers to the Top 40 charts, from the 15-minute show Nat King Cole briefly had in 1957 to the hit that "In Living Color" has become in 1990.
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