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NEWS
February 22, 2009
Community gardening plots available in spring The Howard County Economic Development Authority's Agricultural Marketing Program has announced that the Howard County Conservancy will break ground for a community garden this spring. The conservancy's 63 garden plots are available to rent for $40. The plots are 20 feet by 25 feet. A pollinator garden will attract beneficial insects and wildlife. Deer fencing, water and compost bins will be provided. Gardens are to be pesticide-free, and Bay Wise gardening techniques will be encouraged.
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FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | June 20, 1991
Stephens Hall, the impressive Victorian building facing York Road on the Towson State University campus, and its theater have undergone a complete renovation making the 75-year-old building a state-of-the-art facility.Polished birch wood accents the original turn-of-the-century stylthe remodeled theater. A gala featuring an invitation-only performance of TSU's Maryland Arts Festival production of "West Side Story," directed by Ken Urmston, will be held in the theater Saturday evening. The occasion also commemorates the anniversary of Towson State University.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | November 23, 1990
"Motown 30: What's Going On" is much, much more than a celebration of the three-plus decades of this record label -- it is at once a variety show as old-fashioned as Ed Sullivan, and on the cutting edge as much as Keenan Ivory Wayans.But more importantly, producers Suzanne DePasse and Don Mischer have built this show around a theme -- the demonstration of how, during the last four decades, African-American contributions to the arts moved from the marginal to the mainstream, from the street corners of the do-wop singers to the Top 40 charts, from the 15-minute show Nat King Cole briefly had in 1957 to the hit that "In Living Color" has become in 1990.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2013
An ambitious bookworm in my youth, I once started Victor Hugo's Les Miserables . It was on a recommended-reading list. I ground to a halt a few pages in and discarded the recommended-reading list. I have never seen the musical and have never consciously listened to any of the tunes. And now, as you are already surmising, I intend to give the movie a miss.  I've had a warning from TheMattWalshBlog : "  I cried tears of blissful joy when Russell Crowe threw himself off a bridge at the end because it meant he'd finally stop singing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2005
When a lavish new production of the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical The King and I arrives at the Hippodrome next week -- its third stop on an 11-month national tour -- theater fans will have a chance to see the work of one of America's more prodigious actresses. Millions know Stefanie Powers as the glamorous, crime-stopping star of such TV series as The Girl From U.N.C.L.E. (1967-68) and Hart to Hart (1979-84), but in a five-decade career that began in Hollywood at the age of 15, she has also starred in multiple motion pictures (The Interns, McClintock!
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | September 3, 2011
This time of year, cast members and organizers of the September Song community theater group are usually bustling about, getting ready for the opening of the troupe's annual musical theater production. This year, that familiar cast of characters is bustling again. But this time, they're working on a one-night only fundraising performance aimed at keeping the lights from being dimmed on Carroll County's own touch of Broadway. "There's No Business Like Show Business," a musical revue highlighting songs from past September Song productions and popular Broadway shows, will be presented on Saturday, Sept.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 19, 2004
You can have great successes that go around the world, but in the musical theater, that hit needs to also be a hit on Broadway." It's indicative of the strength of the Broadway brand that these are the words of a British producer, who also happens to be one of the most successful musical theater producers of all time. Cameron Mackintosh makes this statement in Broadway: The American Musical, the monumental six-part PBS series that airs at 9 p.m. today through Thursday on MPT (Channels 22 and 67)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 24, 2000
Audra McDonald How Glory Goes (Nonesuch 79580) What a pathetic thing the musical theater has become. It isn't just that the shows themselves are lacking, replacing the luxuriant melodies of George Gershwin, Cole Porter and Richard Rodgers with the second-hand hooks of Andrew Lloyd Webber; the singers, too, seem scaled down, relying on amplification and inflection to achieve what real vocal power and tone used to accomplish. Thank God for Audra McDonald. Not since Barbara Cook and Barbra Streisand has there been a singer who so completely conveys what musical theater is about.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 21, 2005
It's back in Baltimore - where it belongs. "It" is Audrey II, the carnivorous plant at the center of the fun-with-Faust musical Little Shop of Horrors, and it's in residence at the Hippodrome Theatre for two weeks. The reasons it belongs here are twofold: 1. The lyrics describe Audrey II as "something out of Edgar Allan Poe," and, in case Baltimoreans need to be reminded, the Hippodrome is only a couple blocks from Poe's grave; and 2. the late Howard Ashman, who penned the show's clever lyrics and book, was a native Baltimorean.
NEWS
By Donna Weaver and Donna Weaver,Staff writer | July 31, 1991
As a child, Ron Bopst was the obnoxious kid who hogged all the attention.He couldn't get enough. The classic "ham" was always singing, always looking for the spotlight.At family get-togethers, the Glen Burnie resident would team up with a favorite cousin to sing tunes they heard on the radio, songs like "This Magic Moment" by the Drifters and "Take Me Home, Country Roads" by John Denver.His relatives delighted in having the duo singfor them. But Bopst wasn't just singing for the applause.
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