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Musical Chairs

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NEWS
November 20, 1990
That shuffling noise emanating from Washington is the sound of Republicans playing political musical chairs. In the latest round of changes, President Bush's national drug policy adviser, William Bennett, will forsake his current post to become chairman of the Republican National Committee. Meanwhile, Florida's Republican Gov. Bob Martinez, who was defeated in his bid for re-election two weeks ago, is in line to carry on the war against drugs as Bennett's successor in Washington.Bennett, you will recall, said he was vacating drug czar's post after proclaiming "substantial progress" had been made in the war on drugs.
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | May 6, 2013
A shave and a haircut of yesteryear cost the proverbial two bits, 25 cents. A shave alone at The Old Bank Barbers, a soon-to-open barber shop on The Avenue in Hampden, will cost $25. It won't be any old shave, though. Owner Daniel Wells promises an old-fashioned, full-face, straight-edge shave, complete with hot lather, in a leather chair with a headrest that leans back. "It's an old-school barber shop with the tile floors," said Wells, who hopes to open this month at 1100 W. 36th St., the former site of Sixteen Tons, a men's clothing store.
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NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | April 6, 1994
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- With the clock now running on the term limitations voted by the California electorate in 1990, an elaborate game of political musical chairs is going on in an unsettled state legislature.Although the first "class" won't be forced out of office until the end of 1996, when the new law of "six years and out" comes into play for the full state Assembly, legislators are already casting about for places to land. And in many cases they are looking to other government or government-associated jobs that the limits were supposed to clean out for fresh faces and non-career "citizen legislators."
NEWS
October 10, 2011
Columnist Ron Smith says the Occupy Wall Street movement is "creepy" ("Is serious social unrest in our future?" Oct. 7). Really? How about the movement bankrolled by billionaires where people parade around in powdered wigs and proclaim the evils of Social Security? Sometimes, I think GOP must stand for Gullible Old People. Republican voters have been duped into electing politicians who want our government to fail and then whine when it does. Do they even know who the 1 percent are?
NEWS
August 20, 1998
HARFORD COUNTY discovered something better than term limits in 1998. It's called ambition.Eileen M. Rehrmann was barred by law from a third term as county executive, leading to her recently aborted run for governor. Other incumbents sought her seat, leading still other incumbents to attempt a shot at those vacancies. The result of this musical chairs is that Harford voters have impressive choices for the primary.District 34, which covers the southern and eastern parts of the xTC county, has a major battle for state Senate between Democratic Del. Mary Louise Preis and Republican Del. Nancy Jacobs, a rising star among conservatives.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Gwyneth K. Shaw and David Nitkin and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2005
Democratic Party leaders relish the prospect of new blood at the top of the ticket as Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes departs the political scene. While well respected and a solid campaigner, Sarbanes, 72, has been part of a venerable old guard, which includes 83-year-old Comptroller William Donald Schaefer and 73-year-old Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr., all of whom are serving in terms that expire next year. The powerful trio has blocked the upward movement of prospective leaders for decades.
NEWS
October 10, 2011
Columnist Ron Smith says the Occupy Wall Street movement is "creepy" ("Is serious social unrest in our future?" Oct. 7). Really? How about the movement bankrolled by billionaires where people parade around in powdered wigs and proclaim the evils of Social Security? Sometimes, I think GOP must stand for Gullible Old People. Republican voters have been duped into electing politicians who want our government to fail and then whine when it does. Do they even know who the 1 percent are?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | July 2, 2000
This was no ordinary fifth birthday party. Forget about pin-the- tail-on-the-donkey or musical chairs. The 120 grown-up guests came to the Garrett-Jacobs Mansion in party dresses and tuxes. They sipped champagne in the back garden, and supped in the opulent ballroom, celebrating the Hampden Family Center's fifth anniversary -- a joint effort of the Junior League of Baltimore and the Greater Hampden Coalition. Among those on the party list: Monica Cook and Alice Ann Finnerty, event co-chairs; Jennifer Engel, Stephanie Johnson, Elizabeth Haynes, Lynn Henss and Brad Warbasse, event committee members; Beth Volk, Hampden Family Center board president; Robert E. Gerring, Dina Klicos, Pam Malester, Marietta K. Nolley and Karen L. Malloy, board members; Lisa Ghinger, Hampden Family Center executive director; and Floraine Applefeld, Maryland You Are Beautiful program director.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | June 20, 1993
Ribbons, ruffles and rounds of lace are what Westminster's little girls are made of -- at least in these dads' eyes.Thursday night, in honor of Father's Day, 100 of the city's best-dressed young ladies aged 5 to 13 escorted their favorite man to a formal dinner and dance sponsored by the City of Westminster."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 19, 2002
11 Ex-Boyfriends Defend Their Actions. Ya gotta love the title. Unless, of course, you're one of the exes. And Karen Gray's one-woman show at the Theatre Project certainly does rake a bunch of former beaus over the coals. There's the artist she calls "the breastmeister," and the philandering state senator, and the rock musician/anthropology major/"respected alcoholic," and on and on. But despite its title, Gray's show isn't merely an exercise in boyfriend-bashing. It also offers a philosophy of life for the middle-aged single woman.
SPORTS
By Phil Rogers | September 19, 2010
Cross one off from the long list of managerial question marks. Don Mattingly will replace Joe Torre as the Dodgers' manager, but it's unclear what happens to Torre, along with so much more. We have known for a long time this was going to be a historic offseason in terms of manager movement, given the scheduled retirement of Bobby Cox and Cito Gaston and the uncertainty surrounding Lou Piniella, Tony La Russa and Torre. But the scope of the potential turnover has continued to grow, hitting epic proportions with blossoming rumors about Ozzie Guillen and Joe Girardi.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER and RAY FRAGER,ray.frager@baltsun.com | March 13, 2009
Serving up another week of sports media notes while trying to recover from being an hour late for everything for several days before realizing daylight saving time had kicked in: * Are you sort of the college basketball version of Punxsutawney Phil, just popping up each March for the NCAA tournament? If so, here's a heads-up about Sunday's tournament selection show on CBS (6 p.m., chs. 13, 9): Billy Packer is gone. Clark Kellogg replaced him as the network's No. 1 game analyst. That guy sitting in Kellogg's old studio seat?
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | November 13, 2005
Call it the year of the political domino. They're falling all over the state. When Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele announced he was running for the U.S. Senate, he left a slot to be filled by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. Let the mentioning begin. If Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. decides to retire, there'll be an opening there. At least three eager candidates are waiting to hear. Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes started it. He announced his retirement months ago, opening the primary field for an impatient scrum of Democratic Party stars who have been pawing the ground at the bottom of the ladder for years.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Gwyneth K. Shaw and David Nitkin and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2005
Democratic Party leaders relish the prospect of new blood at the top of the ticket as Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes departs the political scene. While well respected and a solid campaigner, Sarbanes, 72, has been part of a venerable old guard, which includes 83-year-old Comptroller William Donald Schaefer and 73-year-old Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr., all of whom are serving in terms that expire next year. The powerful trio has blocked the upward movement of prospective leaders for decades.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2004
It wasn't simply adjusting to the speed of the game or the size of the defenders. For North Carolina sophomore attackman Scott Falatach, the hardest part of the transition from high school to college involved a mental adjustment more than anything physical. "It was assuming a role that was not as large as the one I had in high school," said Falatach, who recorded 111 points during his senior year at St. Mary's, grabbing All-Metro Player of the Year honors and the C. Markland Kelly Award, given to the state's best high school lacrosse player.
NEWS
October 1, 2003
AS A MAJOR league baseball player for 12 years, Mike Hargrove would so deliberately prepare himself before stepping into the batter's box for every pitch that he became known as "the Human Rain Delay." That studied approach twice enabled him to lead the American League in walks. And it would seem to be good preparation for the vagaries of life as big-league manager. These days, baseball managers come and go in what seems a desperate exercise in musical chairs - one that really gets going this time of year with the onset of post-season play.
NEWS
October 1, 2003
AS A MAJOR league baseball player for 12 years, Mike Hargrove would so deliberately prepare himself before stepping into the batter's box for every pitch that he became known as "the Human Rain Delay." That studied approach twice enabled him to lead the American League in walks. And it would seem to be good preparation for the vagaries of life as big-league manager. These days, baseball managers come and go in what seems a desperate exercise in musical chairs - one that really gets going this time of year with the onset of post-season play.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | February 19, 1991
One year, that's all it lasted. UMBC couldn't wait to join the East Coast Conference. Now, as the league faces extinction, it has virtually no choice but to leave.No one blinks anymore when a Miami joins the Big East or a Florida State joins the Atlantic Coast Conference. But then you look at a UMBC, and you realize just how screwy the game of conference musical chairs has become.UMBC was an independent its first four years of Division I, giving its men's basketball team the unique educational opportunity of playing 56 different opponents in 20 different states.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2003
Medical reports, police blotters and 40-yard-dash times may resolve the secrets of the NFL draft's first round tomorrow. The best running back coming out, Miami's Willis McGahee, still can't run full speed after major knee reconstruction. One of the better receivers, Tennessee's Kelley Washington, probably won't be cleared for contact until training camp because of spinal fusion surgery. And one of the better cornerbacks, Oregon State's Dennis Weathersby, has a bullet hole in his back after a drive-by shooting near Los Angeles on Sunday.
NEWS
February 25, 2003
BIG-CITY and big-county school chiefs are sitting pretty these days. The latest example is Baltimore County Superintendent Joe A. Hairston, who is about to get his employment contract extended though it doesn't expire for more than a year. Hired only 2 1/2 years ago after a secretive "national search," Mr. Hairston is rumored to be a possible successor to departing Prince George's County Superintendent Iris T. Metts. Mr. Hairston won't be the first metropolitan superintendent recently to enjoy the fruits of "creative retention."
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