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By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 4, 1992
We've known for a long time that NBC is ecstatic to have a Dream Team Olympics.And it makes ratings sense for the network to pursue female viewers with a family Olympics strategy that shuns sports such as boxing and spotlights more women's events.But how about the way NBC is turning segments of its coverage into the VH-1 Olympics? Is that Eric Clapton in shape or what?Each day, the network presents at least one made-to-order music video that blends the songs of popular recording artists with highly stylized sports photography.
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By Catharine Hamm, Tribune Newspapers | June 12, 2014
Richard Dunn was alone overnight in Las Vegas' McCarran airport, so he did what any bored passenger would do: He produced a five-minute music video featuring Celine Dion's “All By Myself.” He told the Las Vegas Weekly that he procured a roll of luggage tape from someone at a ticket counter and taped his iPhone to the pole of a wheelchair for the selfie shots at the Vegas airport. “Then I would put it on the moving walkway for a dolly shot,” Dunn wrote on his Vimeo page , the Weekly reported.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | January 18, 1994
Black Entertainment Television (BET) is cutting back on music videos that show guns or violence, according to an executive of the cable channel."We're starting '94 with a policy of curtailing guns and overall violence that is portrayed in music videos provided to us," Jeff Lee, BET's executive vice president, said at a press conference."
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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
If you're a middle-aged construction worker living in Baltimore and don't have any dance experience, you might think your odds of appearing in a music video are pretty low. Well, here's your big chance. Baltimore-based dreamy rock duo Wye Oak is seeking "people who fit the look of a construction worker or mechanic type" for their next video, according to a Craigslist post that band member Jenn Wasner shared on Facebook.  The band is seeking seven men and three women, preferably between the ages of 30 and 50.  Those "who enjoy getting dirty" are encouraged to apply.
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By Eric Gwinn and Eric Gwinn,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 31, 2003
Once an afterthought in the production process, video game soundtracks increasingly use original music to reach new listeners who blur traditional entertainment boundaries. "Record companies are realizing that this is the new radio," says Greg O'Connor-Read, founder of Music4Games.com and an agent for video game composers. In addition to licensing existing tunes, record companies also are commissioning new works for games. Big names have written music for games now on the shelves for the holiday season.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Marissa Gallo | November 2, 2011
Smize, booty tooch, H to T - I can handle all of these catchphrases Tyra comes up with because they actually have to do with modeling. But tonight, she went one step too far: pot ledom. Yes, that's "top model" backwards. Why? Because she's freakin' Tyra Banks and can do whatever she wants. Fortunately for us viewers, with a terrible, horrible, no-good catchphrase came amazingly ridiculous music videos with viral video star Keenan Cahill and Tyra with crazy pigtails. Oh man, so good.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | October 24, 1999
In the beginning on MTV, there were music videos.Lots of them. Twenty-five hours a day of them, it seemed, featuring the biggest names in pop music. Or at least enough that you could catch a video pretty much whenever you flipped to the channel.But turn on MTV today and you'll likely find a karaoke show with goofy, ordinary people prancing around and caterwauling to the Backstreet Boys. You'll see a show where crazed fans are co-stars when they meet celebrities like George Clooney, Mariah Carey or Snoop Dogg.
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April 23, 1999
When Baltimore magazine published a story about "Homicide: Life on the Street" in 1997, it ran a couple of photographs of rehearsals. The actors Yaphet Kotto and Andre Braugher were identified. The tall, powerfully built and bespectacled director was not.The omission was ironic, since the director, Mark Pellington, would have made a pretty good subject for an article in his own right.The son of Bill Pellington, the Baltimore Colts linebacker who helped his team win the NFL championship in 1958, Mark grew up in Timonium and attended St. Paul's School.
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By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | August 5, 1997
Warning: Public health experts have determined that watching MTV may be hazardous to your health.But it's not the rock and roll they're concerned about.It's the smoking and drinking that accompany all that writhing and singing.After an examination of 518 music videos (monitored by teams of 17- to 24-year-olds), doctors at Children's Hospital in Boston found that more than one MTV video in four portrayed musicians or actors smoking and drinking alcohol. Videos on VH1, another music network, showed smoking in 23 percent and drinking in 25 percent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2010
Few bands have been able to capitalize on the Internet like OK Go. The Los Angeles-based rock foursome was catapulted into the mainstream when the lo-fi video for their song "A Million Ways" went viral, eventually racking up about 9 million downloads. Since then, OK Go has become just as popular for its music videos as its music. Here are three essential OK Go music videos. "A Million Ways": This video started it all. Filmed in singer Damian Kulash's backyard, it features the band performing a dance routine, choreographed by Kulash's sister, Trish Sie. The video's success caught the band and its label by surprise, and prompted the band to keep making quirky, low budget videos.
SPORTS
Baltimore Sun Staff | August 23, 2013
Apparently former Pittsburgh Steelers head coach and current CBS analyst Bill Cowher is dating a singer named Queen V. And apparently she needed a tall bearded guy with a big chin to wear eyeliner in a music video. Here is the finished product, and if there is any better way to start your weekend, we can't think of one.
NEWS
SPECIAL TO THE AEGIS | August 2, 2013
Like many 18-year-olds, Piper Bateman, of Fallston recently graduated from high school and is preparing to enter college in the fall, but before she starts classes, Bateman plans to shoot a music video. Working with Baltimore-based filmmaker Jane Hollon, Bateman is finalizing the selection of shooting locations, costumes and other details for the shooting of the video of her original song, "Finally a Refugee. " Bateman and Hollon set out to raise the $2,000 needed for production of the video through an online pledge campaign.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2013
A fan of rhinestones and bling, Ashley Forrest, 25, is a rising country singer from Crofton. This Ravens fan's latest album, Seven Hundred Miles, was released April 16 and she will be performing at Rams Head On Stage in Annapolis on Sunday. Before heading to the show, we caught up with the singer to find out some of her OMG-worthy loves. Worst pet peeve? I don't let the little things get to me, and I am really bubbly, so I don't really have one. What song are you hating/loving right now?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
For at least a generation of pop-culture consumers, the soundtrack of their lives has included themes from the likes of Mega Man and Super Mario. As they've grown up, the music of video games has branched out - to solo piano, to rock concerts and to symphonic performances. Among the developments is the University of Maryland's Gamer Symphony Orchestra, whose 100-plus members will take to the stage at College Park's Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center on Saturday, May 4. "The quality of video-game music has grown exponentially over the years," says Joel Guttman, president-elect of the group, which specializes in arranging and performing pieces taken from the background music on video games such as Halo, Sonic the Hedgehog and Final Fantasy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Zach Sparks, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2013
Last year was a big one for Baltimore alternative/new wave band the Perfects. Three music videos - two from their first album "Many Nights" and one from their new album "A Sudden Victory" - reached No. 1 on MTV's website. For lead singer and songwriter Ric Peters, it was reaffirming. Before the videos became popular, he wasn't sure if the Perfects would even record a second album. "It came about quickly," said Peters. "After the success we had with [the song] "Girls That Dance" and "Many Nights" on MTV, it made sense to repackage songs from that record, put some new material together and introduce the band to a new group of people.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2012
Here's a tip to everyone making music videos: involve puppets*. Somehow. Sock puppets even. If the new Muppets movie taught us anything - and it taught us a lot -  is that puppets can improve even Jason Segel vehicles. Puppets could make Skrillex music videos passable. So it was a pleasure to see the new video from Baltimore proto-punks Dope Body. It features all the big P's: punks, puppets and paranoia. The video is for Dope Body's "Bangers & Yos," off their first proper album "Nupping," which was released last year.
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By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | May 30, 1995
Q: Both my teens watch a lot of MTV. A lot of the videos seem to contain sex and violence. What is known about music videos' effect on teen-agers?A: In that music videos are a much newer form of entertainment, much less is known about what, if any affect, the content will have on young people. The concern is that visual images of sex and violence will negatively affect adolescents' own behaviors. In one study, more than 50 percent of rock videos contained violent imagery and 75 percent included sexual images.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, b | August 3, 2011
"Our Deal," the best song from Best Coast's still-good debut, Crazy For You , gets the Supervideo treatment. What's a Supervideo you ask? It's when MTV commissions a video to later play on a channel that doesn't play music videos anymore. It's obviously counter-productive, but I'll leave that argument for writers who care more. Much more importantly, the Drew Barrymore-directed video is a silly joy, with graffiti, love, tragedy, a big-time gang brawl (I'd be a Day Trotter)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Marissa Gallo | November 2, 2011
Smize, booty tooch, H to T - I can handle all of these catchphrases Tyra comes up with because they actually have to do with modeling. But tonight, she went one step too far: pot ledom. Yes, that's "top model" backwards. Why? Because she's freakin' Tyra Banks and can do whatever she wants. Fortunately for us viewers, with a terrible, horrible, no-good catchphrase came amazingly ridiculous music videos with viral video star Keenan Cahill and Tyra with crazy pigtails. Oh man, so good.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, b | August 3, 2011
"Our Deal," the best song from Best Coast's still-good debut, Crazy For You , gets the Supervideo treatment. What's a Supervideo you ask? It's when MTV commissions a video to later play on a channel that doesn't play music videos anymore. It's obviously counter-productive, but I'll leave that argument for writers who care more. Much more importantly, the Drew Barrymore-directed video is a silly joy, with graffiti, love, tragedy, a big-time gang brawl (I'd be a Day Trotter)
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