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By Abigail Green, For The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Research shows that music therapy has a profound impact on premature infants. We asked Clarissa Karlsson, a board-certified music therapist at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.C., to explain the benefits. How does music therapy benefit preemies? Music therapy can positively affect premature infants' physiological stability, increase opportunities for bonding and attachment with caregivers, and provide appropriate developmental stimulation. Babies born before term are not as neurologically mature or physiologically stable as full-term babies.
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FEATURES
By Abigail Green, For The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Research shows that music therapy has a profound impact on premature infants. We asked Clarissa Karlsson, a board-certified music therapist at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.C., to explain the benefits. How does music therapy benefit preemies? Music therapy can positively affect premature infants' physiological stability, increase opportunities for bonding and attachment with caregivers, and provide appropriate developmental stimulation. Babies born before term are not as neurologically mature or physiologically stable as full-term babies.
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NEWS
December 28, 1992
JULIE MAY HART, 17,daughter of Edwin and Gay Hart o Manor Drive in Woodbine.School: Senior at South Carroll High School.Honored for: Making the Maryland All-State Band,in which she will play clarinet at a concert this spring in Ocean City.Goals: To attend college next year and major in music education or music therapy.Comments: "Music has been so much a part of my life,and I've always said I wanted to be a teacher. I was introduced to music therapy this summer and it just hit me real hard.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Linda Kellar seemed too young for dementia, the slow-forming disease that erodes the memories of people usually much older than the then-54-year-old housewife. But in 2009 that's what doctors found to be the cause of Kellar's severe agitation, memory loss, sleepless nights, babbling and hallucinations. Kellar now spends her days at Keswick Multi-Care Center under constant care because of the disease, which has progressed steadily since the diagnosis. Her husband, Arnold, knows that dementia will eventually take his wife's life.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Linda Kellar seemed too young for dementia, the slow-forming disease that erodes the memories of people usually much older than the then-54-year-old housewife. But in 2009 that's what doctors found to be the cause of Kellar's severe agitation, memory loss, sleepless nights, babbling and hallucinations. Kellar now spends her days at Keswick Multi-Care Center under constant care because of the disease, which has progressed steadily since the diagnosis. Her husband, Arnold, knows that dementia will eventually take his wife's life.
NEWS
May 18, 2003
National MS Society to hold program on changing perceptions The National Multiple Sclerosis Society will hold a program for people with MS, their families and friends from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 31 at the Best Western Catering and Conference Center in Westminster. Tim Daly, founder of the Access Group, will discuss changing perceptions about disabilities. The Access Group focuses on the removal of attitudinal barriers in interactions with people with disabilities that affect organizations.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
On any given day, the activity in Ellen Vikestad's classroom would resemble a round of bumper cars. As Vikestad and her special-needs students at Claremont High School have made their way from one end of her cramped classroom to the other for lessons, they do so in a 15-minute navigation of instruments, desks and one another. On Tuesday, officials from the Baltimore Teachers Union and the city school system surprised Vikestad with news: Soon that would change. Vikestad, in her fifth year of teaching music therapy at Claremont — a tiny school that offers a life-skills curriculum for its 61 students who are not pursuing diplomas — won the BTU Extreme Classroom Makeover contest, held every year by the local union and its parent organization, the American Federation of Teachers.
FEATURES
By Michele Strutin and Michele Strutin,Excerpted from In Health magazine Distributed by Universal Press Syndicate | January 15, 1991
AT CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL in Washington, a clutch of third-graders, clad in miniature scrub gowns, mills noisily about the atrium lobby, trying out stethoscopes and pumping up blood pressure cuffs.Small heads bob among X-ray machines and exhibits of emergency room equipment. The orthopedics department, demonstrating casting techniques, has gathered a little crowd, where doctors are fitting the children's fingers with slip-on casts, then letting the kids paint these "hard bandages" to make whimsical finger puppets.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 10, 2007
Cancer patient John Lukow perked up when the giant caterpillar and the flower lady entered his hospital room. "Hello! I'm Katy the Caterpillar," Mary Beth Creighton said, adjusting her bright-green costume. "Yeah, and I'm Frankenstein," Lukow responded, chuckling. Creighton laughed and gestured toward her partner, Meg Schnitzlein. "And she's Daffy," Creighton said of Schnitzlein, decked out in a white dress with big yellow polka dots, striped pantaloons, a straw hat with yellow flowers and pink shoes.
NEWS
Special to The Aegis | December 9, 2013
Jessica McAllister has joined Brightview Bel Air, a Brightview Senior Living community in Bel Air, as vibrant living director. "We are delighted to have Jessica join our team," Executive Director Jen Bourgeois said in a news release. "Our caring and highly trained associates drive the success of our communities and, together with residents, bring our mission - Live Vibrant - to life each day. " As vibrant living director, McAllister leads the team that provides vibrant programming in the community's assisted living and award winning Wellspring Village neighborhood for memory and Alzheimer's Care.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
On any given day, the activity in Ellen Vikestad's classroom would resemble a round of bumper cars. As Vikestad and her special-needs students at Claremont High School have made their way from one end of her cramped classroom to the other for lessons, they do so in a 15-minute navigation of instruments, desks and one another. On Tuesday, officials from the Baltimore Teachers Union and the city school system surprised Vikestad with news: Soon that would change. Vikestad, in her fifth year of teaching music therapy at Claremont — a tiny school that offers a life-skills curriculum for its 61 students who are not pursuing diplomas — won the BTU Extreme Classroom Makeover contest, held every year by the local union and its parent organization, the American Federation of Teachers.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 10, 2007
Cancer patient John Lukow perked up when the giant caterpillar and the flower lady entered his hospital room. "Hello! I'm Katy the Caterpillar," Mary Beth Creighton said, adjusting her bright-green costume. "Yeah, and I'm Frankenstein," Lukow responded, chuckling. Creighton laughed and gestured toward her partner, Meg Schnitzlein. "And she's Daffy," Creighton said of Schnitzlein, decked out in a white dress with big yellow polka dots, striped pantaloons, a straw hat with yellow flowers and pink shoes.
NEWS
May 18, 2003
National MS Society to hold program on changing perceptions The National Multiple Sclerosis Society will hold a program for people with MS, their families and friends from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 31 at the Best Western Catering and Conference Center in Westminster. Tim Daly, founder of the Access Group, will discuss changing perceptions about disabilities. The Access Group focuses on the removal of attitudinal barriers in interactions with people with disabilities that affect organizations.
NEWS
December 28, 1992
JULIE MAY HART, 17,daughter of Edwin and Gay Hart o Manor Drive in Woodbine.School: Senior at South Carroll High School.Honored for: Making the Maryland All-State Band,in which she will play clarinet at a concert this spring in Ocean City.Goals: To attend college next year and major in music education or music therapy.Comments: "Music has been so much a part of my life,and I've always said I wanted to be a teacher. I was introduced to music therapy this summer and it just hit me real hard.
FEATURES
By Michele Strutin and Michele Strutin,Excerpted from In Health magazine Distributed by Universal Press Syndicate | January 15, 1991
AT CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL in Washington, a clutch of third-graders, clad in miniature scrub gowns, mills noisily about the atrium lobby, trying out stethoscopes and pumping up blood pressure cuffs.Small heads bob among X-ray machines and exhibits of emergency room equipment. The orthopedics department, demonstrating casting techniques, has gathered a little crowd, where doctors are fitting the children's fingers with slip-on casts, then letting the kids paint these "hard bandages" to make whimsical finger puppets.
NEWS
May 11, 1993
Liberty student wins scholarship for Pa. college$500 recipient to study TV, filmsTim Miller of Eldersburg has won a $500 scholarship to attend Elizabethtown College in Lancaster County, Pa.He won the scholarship this spring in a competition with other high school students planning to study communications at the liberal arts college.Tim is a senior at Liberty High School and the son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas O. Miller of Eldersburg.The 17-year-old plans to focus on motion pictures and television when he starts at Elizabethtown next fall.
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 9, 2006
Little Women would certainly never be lumped into the "disaster" genre -- no ocean liners sink; no skyscrapers collapse. But this gentle musical gives the performer once dubbed "The Disaster Theme Queen" a solo every bit as uplifting as The Poseidon Adventure's "The Morning After" or The Towering Inferno's "We May Never Love Like This Again." In Little Women, the musical adapted from Louisa May Alcott's classic novel, McGovern plays Marmee, mother of the four March sisters. After the death of daughter Beth, Marmee sings "Days of Plenty," to encourage daughter Jo. ("So believe that she mattered / And believe that she always will.
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