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By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 6, 2001
AUNIQUE MUSICAL experience is part of the instrumental program at Shiloh Middle School. With instrumental music lessons, band director Philip Stephenson teaches music theory and helps pupils write and conduct performances of their compositions. In alternate years, the young composers meet a professional composer, Quincy Hilliard, who spends a day creating music with the children and is guest conductor during a public concert. Hilliard has composed more than 100 works, which are performed by middle school-age musicians around the world.
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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
Polly Moser drew inspiration from watching rivers flowing down the mountains during a family hiking trip to California and Nevada. The Burleigh Manor Middle School seventh-grader crafted her first full composition, "The Flow of Water," and entered it in an annual National PTA competition. Polly's work won the top national honor for music composition in May and will be among the works exhibited at the U.S. Department of Education. The contest, Reflections, draws entries from hundreds of thousands of students across the country in the categories of music composition, dance choreography, film production, literature, photography and visual arts.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | June 22, 2007
William Robinson Cook, a retired French horn and lute player who also restored and repaired instruments, died Sunday of a heart attack at his Towson home. He was 76. Mr. Cook was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. He was a 1949 graduate of City College and attended Western Maryland College. During the Korean War, he enlisted in the Navy and served aboard the battleship USS Missouri as a member of the ship's band. "He also told stories of being a gunner and an ammunition passer working far below the waterline of the ship," said his wife of eight years, the former Nedra Poe. "Wherever he was and whatever he did, Bill could find the quixotic and interesting to remember and relate."
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2011
The band members met for the first time just two hours ago, but they're already hard at work on a rock classic, and to be honest, it's not sounding half-bad. A rhythm guitarist pounds out G and F chords. A bass player settles on a solid beat. A singer steps up to the mike. "The things they do look awful c-cold," he croons, sounding every inch a latter-day Roger Daltrey, longtime frontman of The Who. "Hope I die before I get old. " But something's amiss with the keyboard player.
NEWS
January 26, 1991
Services for Emma E. Weyforth, retired professor of music at what is now Towson State University, will be held at 11 a.m. today at the Henry W. Jenkins and Sons, 4905 York Road.Miss Weyforth, who was 98, died late Wednesday in her sleep at her home on Thicket Road in the Pinehurst area.She retired in 1962 after about 40 years on the Towson faculty, teaching music appreciation, music theory, conducting and other courses and directing the Glee Club. Earlier, she taught English at the Catonsville High School.
NEWS
By Patrick L. Hickerson and Patrick L. Hickerson,Contributing Writer | July 31, 1995
John Henry Carton, a teacher of music theory at Peabody Conservatory, died Saturday of cancer at his Mount Vernon home. He was 61.For 25 years, the Woburn, Mass., native taught music education and later music theory at Peabody through this year's spring semester."He liked theory. He liked the structure of music," said his wife, the former Stella Center. They would have celebrated their 41st anniversary today.Mr. Carton grew up with music, and played a church organ. The keyboard was his primary instrument.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood | June 8, 2008
Appointed artistic director and conductor of the Handel Choir of Baltimore in 2004, Melinda O'Neal has been praised for her "lucid and musical understanding of the score," "moving and satisfying interpretations" and her "stylish and clear manner on the podium." A Berlioz specialist and an aficionado of Mozart, O'Neal also is professor of music at Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H., where she teaches courses in conducting and music theory. "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee I appreciated the message of values of doing the right thing.
NEWS
May 23, 2001
Knights and Fair Maidens Gallop back in time to Life in the Middle Ages at www.kyrene.k12.az.us / schools / brisas / sunda / ma / mahome.htm. This site was created by Mrs. Sunda's gifted resource class at Kyrene de las Brisas Elementary School in Chandler, Ariz. Learn how to become a knight or find out about the crusades. Check out what people in medieval times ate and what clothes they wore. Then take a trip to castles and cathedrals. Find out about the special role of women in the Middle Ages.
FEATURES
By John Milward and John Milward,New York Times News Service | June 12, 1992
On a recent Monday, Howard Morgen, who makes his living teaching guitar, traveled to Manhattan to give private lessons to Carly Simon, Paul Simon and James Taylor. Mr. Morgen, who usually requires students to come to his home in Great Neck, N.Y., makes house calls for pop stars.So just what are three musicians who have written dozens of hit songs and sold millions of albums doing taking music lessons? Unlike classical musicians, pop performers rarely spring from the conservatory. Instead, they hone their styles in bars and clubs and depend more on intuition and inspiration than on organized instruction.
NEWS
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 1998
Composer Thomas Benjamin looks like Santa Claus, and he hopes the members of the Candlelight Concerts audience like the present he is giving them tomorrow.As part of the celebration of its 25th season, Columbia's premier concert series commissioned Benjamin, a teacher at the Peabody Conservatory of Music and a resident of Columbia's Dorsey's Search village, to write a piece for the American Chamber Players.Benjamin knows that he is fighting against the reputation of contemporary classical music that comes from the abrasively dissonant and unfriendly compositions he remembers from his student days in the 1960s.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood | June 8, 2008
Appointed artistic director and conductor of the Handel Choir of Baltimore in 2004, Melinda O'Neal has been praised for her "lucid and musical understanding of the score," "moving and satisfying interpretations" and her "stylish and clear manner on the podium." A Berlioz specialist and an aficionado of Mozart, O'Neal also is professor of music at Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H., where she teaches courses in conducting and music theory. "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee I appreciated the message of values of doing the right thing.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | June 22, 2007
William Robinson Cook, a retired French horn and lute player who also restored and repaired instruments, died Sunday of a heart attack at his Towson home. He was 76. Mr. Cook was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. He was a 1949 graduate of City College and attended Western Maryland College. During the Korean War, he enlisted in the Navy and served aboard the battleship USS Missouri as a member of the ship's band. "He also told stories of being a gunner and an ammunition passer working far below the waterline of the ship," said his wife of eight years, the former Nedra Poe. "Wherever he was and whatever he did, Bill could find the quixotic and interesting to remember and relate."
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 6, 2001
AUNIQUE MUSICAL experience is part of the instrumental program at Shiloh Middle School. With instrumental music lessons, band director Philip Stephenson teaches music theory and helps pupils write and conduct performances of their compositions. In alternate years, the young composers meet a professional composer, Quincy Hilliard, who spends a day creating music with the children and is guest conductor during a public concert. Hilliard has composed more than 100 works, which are performed by middle school-age musicians around the world.
NEWS
May 23, 2001
Knights and Fair Maidens Gallop back in time to Life in the Middle Ages at www.kyrene.k12.az.us / schools / brisas / sunda / ma / mahome.htm. This site was created by Mrs. Sunda's gifted resource class at Kyrene de las Brisas Elementary School in Chandler, Ariz. Learn how to become a knight or find out about the crusades. Check out what people in medieval times ate and what clothes they wore. Then take a trip to castles and cathedrals. Find out about the special role of women in the Middle Ages.
NEWS
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 1998
Composer Thomas Benjamin looks like Santa Claus, and he hopes the members of the Candlelight Concerts audience like the present he is giving them tomorrow.As part of the celebration of its 25th season, Columbia's premier concert series commissioned Benjamin, a teacher at the Peabody Conservatory of Music and a resident of Columbia's Dorsey's Search village, to write a piece for the American Chamber Players.Benjamin knows that he is fighting against the reputation of contemporary classical music that comes from the abrasively dissonant and unfriendly compositions he remembers from his student days in the 1960s.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt | May 25, 1997
THE HALF-DOZEN teen-agers in Alexandra Suhoy's music theory class at the Baltimore Music School in Pikesville must have thought they were going crazy last week.Suhoy, a twentysomething, Kiev Conservatory-trained pianist who immigrated to Baltimore from Ukraine five years ago, was playing the role of stern taskmaster. First she would play a short selection from one of the great composers on the piano or a tape she had brought, then quiz her students to identify the pieces."Dvorak?" ventured one youngster after a particularly fiery exposition of the Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | November 2, 1992
Having students bounce tennis balls to learn the meter of music and using pictures to teach musical forms are two of the unusual techniques employed by Clarksville Middle School music teacher Joanne Worthington.Apparently, her offbeat methods are working, because the 17-year Howard County teacher has been designated one of 138 nationally certified music educators by the Music Educators National Conference.The Reston, Va.-based group is made up of 62,000 music educators, administrators, supervisors, consultants and music education majors in colleges.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt | May 25, 1997
THE HALF-DOZEN teen-agers in Alexandra Suhoy's music theory class at the Baltimore Music School in Pikesville must have thought they were going crazy last week.Suhoy, a twentysomething, Kiev Conservatory-trained pianist who immigrated to Baltimore from Ukraine five years ago, was playing the role of stern taskmaster. First she would play a short selection from one of the great composers on the piano or a tape she had brought, then quiz her students to identify the pieces."Dvorak?" ventured one youngster after a particularly fiery exposition of the Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto.
NEWS
By Patrick L. Hickerson and Patrick L. Hickerson,Contributing Writer | July 31, 1995
John Henry Carton, a teacher of music theory at Peabody Conservatory, died Saturday of cancer at his Mount Vernon home. He was 61.For 25 years, the Woburn, Mass., native taught music education and later music theory at Peabody through this year's spring semester."He liked theory. He liked the structure of music," said his wife, the former Stella Center. They would have celebrated their 41st anniversary today.Mr. Carton grew up with music, and played a church organ. The keyboard was his primary instrument.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | December 9, 1994
Eileen Soskin understands that many concert-goers like to sit back, relax and listen to familiar music -- and perhaps even doze. She finds nothing wrong with that.But she insists a concert will leave a more memorable mark if patrons learn something, too."When you've really focused on a piece of music, then you own that music, and it will never be the same again," asserts the professor of music theory and analysis at the Peabody Conservatory.Ms. Soskin hopes to cede ownership of Georg Frideric Handel's "Messiah" to audiences attending the annual performances of the oratorio by the Handel Choir of Baltimore, beginning tomorrow night at the Church of the Redeemer in Baltimore.
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