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By Marc Gunther and Marc Gunther,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 5, 1995
Turn on MTV or VH-1, and before long you'll enter a teen-age male's fantasy world: one where women are young and beautiful, scantily clad and sexually available.This isn't exactly new. Critics have complained for years that music videos portray women as little more than sex objects.Now, though, some people are taking action to counter the attitude of music videos.Kenneth Yates, a businessman and TV producer, runs a music video channel called Z Music Television that promises music videos with Christian themes that won't degrade or exploit women.
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By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 6, 2014
It's an odd thing. Sometimes, when I speak before high school or college students, someone in the audience, knowing I began my professional life as a pop music critic, will ask what I think of music today. I always demur that I don't listen to a lot of it, but that most of what I do hear kind of, well ... bores me. While there are exceptions -- i.e., Adele -- much of it feels corporate, cold, plastic, image-driven, less reflective of talent than tech, more programmed than played.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Ricardo Baca and Ricardo Baca,New York Times News Service | April 19, 2007
Being an adult has its privileges. And you almost have to be 21 or older to remember the days of music videos on television. The lack of music videos on cable's Music Television has become a joke, so much so that 14-year-olds miss the point. For them, the M in MTV stands for something else. Call it Me TV - or even Myopia Television, specializing in the pseudo-reality of shows such as Real World: Denver, The Hills and Bam's Unholy Union. Music videos are the bright snippets that play in small windows during the credits to Laguna Beach - a far cry from the heyday of primetime music-video programming.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, b | December 26, 2011
Plan your week with our guide to everything going on 12/26-1/1. NOTABLE TV MONDAY You Deserve It (season finale; 9 p.m.; ABC) Rizzoli & Isles (season finale; 10 p.m.; TNT) TUESDAY Best in the Business (series debut; 8 p.m.; Discovery) Texas Multi Mamas (series debut; 8 p.m.; WE) The 34th Annual Kennedy Center Honors (special; 9 p.m.; CBS) Extreme Couponing All-Stars (season premiere; 10 p.m.; TLC) THURSDAY Happy New Year, Charlie Brown (special; 8 p.m.; ABC)
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,Staff Writer | June 17, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Gov. Bill Clinton, continuing his strategy of addressing voters directly through popular television shows, invaded the airwaves territory of the hip young adult yesterday by taking questions from under-30 viewers at the studios of Music Television (MTV).Although most of the questions were not much different from those repeatedly asked by their elders this year, the rap-and-roll set did smoke Mr. Clinton out on two matters of relative importance. He said that if he had the chance, he would appoint Gov. Mario M. Cuomo of New York to the Supreme Court and, yes, that he would have inhaled that infamous marijuana joint had he known how.Mr.
NEWS
By Tim Nelson and Tim Nelson,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 28, 1993
OLIVIA, Minn. -- To MTV, or not to MTV?That's the question these days in Olivia, a town of 2,620 people about two hours west of the Twin Cities.It's "The Corn Capital," according to a sign on the east edge of the city.The talk up at BOLD High School (the acronym is for Bird Island, Olivia and Lake Lillian District) and around town these days is about music videos. Ten years after the town was wired for cable TV, a group of parents say it may be time to cut the Music Television (MTV) channel out of the local cable picture.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | June 18, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- In Bill Clinton's seemingly never-ending quest for new television shows to conquer, his debut on Music Television -- MTV to its expanding audience in an estimated 55.6 million households -- turned out to be no challenge at all.If there was any apprehension that the rebellious young generation that has taken to profane rap artists the way Clinton's own took to Elvis would throw him one curve ball after another, it was soon dismissed. The under-30 set, which is supposed to have things on its mind much different from those bothering elders, mostly asked him the same questions the oldsters have been posing to him all this year.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 6, 2014
It's an odd thing. Sometimes, when I speak before high school or college students, someone in the audience, knowing I began my professional life as a pop music critic, will ask what I think of music today. I always demur that I don't listen to a lot of it, but that most of what I do hear kind of, well ... bores me. While there are exceptions -- i.e., Adele -- much of it feels corporate, cold, plastic, image-driven, less reflective of talent than tech, more programmed than played.
NEWS
By GAIL GRIFFITH | May 18, 1994
The world used to be divided into distinct locales that were sensitive to the traditions of the past. Western popular culture and communication technology have changed that forever.The power of rock and roll, for example, has altered the way young people relate to culture, society and each other -- and gives anyone in reach of a satellite link the ability to share in this medium.Western foreign-policy specialists pay little attention to the influence of popular culture on the lives of the next generation in countries such as Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, Malaysia, India, Pakistan.
FEATURES
April 23, 1999
When Baltimore magazine published a story about "Homicide: Life on the Street" in 1997, it ran a couple of photographs of rehearsals. The actors Yaphet Kotto and Andre Braugher were identified. The tall, powerfully built and bespectacled director was not.The omission was ironic, since the director, Mark Pellington, would have made a pretty good subject for an article in his own right.The son of Bill Pellington, the Baltimore Colts linebacker who helped his team win the NFL championship in 1958, Mark grew up in Timonium and attended St. Paul's School.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2010
A nationally known chef, a Maryland-based entertainment venue and three restaurants will round out the offerings at the Cordish Cos.' planned casino at Arundel Mills mall, company officials announced Thursday. The announcement comes as the battle over slots at Arundel Mills, in which both sides have spent a total of nearly $6 million, enters its final weeks. Anne Arundel County voters will decide on Nov. 2 whether to allow Cordish to construct a 4,750-slot casino on a parking lot at the mall.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ricardo Baca and Ricardo Baca,New York Times News Service | April 19, 2007
Being an adult has its privileges. And you almost have to be 21 or older to remember the days of music videos on television. The lack of music videos on cable's Music Television has become a joke, so much so that 14-year-olds miss the point. For them, the M in MTV stands for something else. Call it Me TV - or even Myopia Television, specializing in the pseudo-reality of shows such as Real World: Denver, The Hills and Bam's Unholy Union. Music videos are the bright snippets that play in small windows during the credits to Laguna Beach - a far cry from the heyday of primetime music-video programming.
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 28, 2006
Country singer LeAnn Rimes meets the Dance Theatre of Harlem on PBS' In Performance at the White House series tonight, and the result is proof positive of art's ability to span cultural divides. Rarely has the East Room shone as brightly as it does when Rimes' sublime interpretation of "Over the Rainbow" is further voiced through the perfectly pitched movements of a young dancer on In Performance at the White House: Dance Theatre of Harlem. Not to make too much of the moment, but on paper, Rimes' inclusion in a program billed as a "celebration of the Dance Theatre of Harlem" seemed questionable.
FEATURES
April 23, 1999
When Baltimore magazine published a story about "Homicide: Life on the Street" in 1997, it ran a couple of photographs of rehearsals. The actors Yaphet Kotto and Andre Braugher were identified. The tall, powerfully built and bespectacled director was not.The omission was ironic, since the director, Mark Pellington, would have made a pretty good subject for an article in his own right.The son of Bill Pellington, the Baltimore Colts linebacker who helped his team win the NFL championship in 1958, Mark grew up in Timonium and attended St. Paul's School.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1998
On MTV's "BIOrhythm: Princess Di," the soundtrack runs the gamut from Verdi to Nirvana. But it's a lyric from No Doubt's "I'm Just a Girl" that best sums up Di's own tragic kingdom:The moment I step outside so many reasons for me to run and hideAnd indeed, "BIOrhythm" shows the conflicted princess running and hiding from the paparazzi, the judgmental royal family and the celebrity that ultimately killed her."BIOrhythm" is an MTV series that presents a famous life with pictures and video footage along with narrative subtitles and a soundtrack.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,sun staff | April 19, 1998
At 12:01 a.m. on Aug. 1, 1981, MTV video jockey Mark Goodman ushered in MTV's first telecast, a Pat Benatar- and Styx-studded hour of videos.As MTV's midwife, he became an '80s icon. But he doesn't see it that way."Do I feel like this huge pioneer?" says Goodman. "No."And neither, in fact, do the four other original VJs, responsible for introducing music videos and giving a face to an infant MTV.Goodman, Nina Blackwood, Martha Quinn, JJ Jackson and Alan Hunter are proud of the role they played in forming youth culture's spokestation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, b | November 28, 2011
Our list of everything going on the week of 11/28-12/4 NOTABLE TV MONDAY Basketball Wives LA: Reunion, Part 2 (special; 8 p.m.; VH1) Top 40 (special; 8 p.m.; BBC America) Bored to Death (season finale; 9 p.m.; HBO) The Closer (mid-season premiere; 9 p.m.; TNT) Next Great Baker (season premiere; 9 p.m.; TLC) Rizzoli & Isles (mid-season premiere; 10 p.m.; TNT) Scouted (series debut; 10 p.m.; E!) TUESDAY America's Supernanny (series debut; 9 p.m.; Lifetime)
FEATURES
By Marc Gunther and Marc Gunther,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 5, 1995
Turn on MTV or VH-1, and before long you'll enter a teen-age male's fantasy world: one where women are young and beautiful, scantily clad and sexually available.This isn't exactly new. Critics have complained for years that music videos portray women as little more than sex objects.Now, though, some people are taking action to counter the attitude of music videos.Kenneth Yates, a businessman and TV producer, runs a music video channel called Z Music Television that promises music videos with Christian themes that won't degrade or exploit women.
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