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By Bloomberg News | February 23, 2007
SAN DIEGO -- Microsoft Corp. should pay Alcatel-Lucent $1.52 billion, a federal jury said yesterday, deciding that the world's biggest software maker used digital music technology without permission and handing down the largest patent ruling in history. The jury said Microsoft infringed two Alcatel-Lucent patents with its Windows Media Player, including the version in the new Vista operating system. Microsoft pledged to challenge the verdict. The decision allows Alcatel-Lucent, the world's biggest maker of communications equipment, to seek an order barring Microsoft from using the patented technology.
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NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,special to the Sun | March 26, 2008
Philip Kehe may be 17, but that doesn't mean he doesn't get it. For a school assignment, the Wilde Lake High School senior had to watch "Don't Know Much About History" - a recent CBS Evening News segment about whether 17-year-olds are out of touch with cultural references and historical facts. The segment included an interview with Mark Bauerlein, author of The Dumbest Generation. Kehe's and his classmates' task was to write a poem about their generation and set it to music using Wilde Lake's Music Technology Lab. "We had to actually relate to current events and what's going on in the world," Kehe said.
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NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,Special to The Sun | October 21, 2007
Drew Moszczienski has not taken a band class in several years. The high school senior can still play trombone, but he prefers writing and playing his own songs on guitar and bass. Until this year, there were few outlets at River Hill High for musicians like him. Now Drew is one of about 40 students plugging their instruments into state-of-the-art computers in River Hill's new music technology lab. Aimed at nontraditional music students, the $120,000 lab opened Oct. 1. Just over a year ago, M. Joseph Fischer, River Hill's director of bands, was looking for a way to target students like Drew.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,Special to The Sun | October 21, 2007
Drew Moszczienski has not taken a band class in several years. The high school senior can still play trombone, but he prefers writing and playing his own songs on guitar and bass. Until this year, there were few outlets at River Hill High for musicians like him. Now Drew is one of about 40 students plugging their instruments into state-of-the-art computers in River Hill's new music technology lab. Aimed at nontraditional music students, the $120,000 lab opened Oct. 1. Just over a year ago, M. Joseph Fischer, River Hill's director of bands, was looking for a way to target students like Drew.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,special to the Sun | March 26, 2008
Philip Kehe may be 17, but that doesn't mean he doesn't get it. For a school assignment, the Wilde Lake High School senior had to watch "Don't Know Much About History" - a recent CBS Evening News segment about whether 17-year-olds are out of touch with cultural references and historical facts. The segment included an interview with Mark Bauerlein, author of The Dumbest Generation. Kehe's and his classmates' task was to write a poem about their generation and set it to music using Wilde Lake's Music Technology Lab. "We had to actually relate to current events and what's going on in the world," Kehe said.
FEATURES
By Lou Carlozo and Lou Carlozo,Chicago Tribune | August 22, 1995
Canton Becker and Matt Moller don't have any gold albums to their credit. They have never headlined a concert and don't even perform their music outside their respective college apartments.Nor are their songs well-known, not even among their classmates at Northwestern University in Chicago. Yet Mr. Becker and Mr. Moller, who became fast friends after meeting last year in a music technology class, may some day be hailed as the John Lennon and Paul McCartney of cyberspace.To date, they have jammed with musicians in England, France, Canada and Norway -- all without leaving Evanston, Ill. -- thanks to their magnum opus, a copyrighted software program.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2001
He's amiable and animated, and students at Towson High School say he understands the way their teen-age minds tick. So they can't understand why their principal, Gwendolyn R. Grant, has decided to replace music teacher Jim Walker with an outsider, someone students say won't be able to match his enthusiasm or musical expertise. "Ms. Grant is quick to say that Mr. Walker doesn't have the right leadership skills, but she has never seen him in class. ... She's never seen the way he motivates students," said Sarah Kendall, 18, a 12th-grader who is a member of Towson's vocal ensemble.
FEATURES
April 1, 1995
The 20th-Century Music Festival held at Towson State University next week will celebrate the anniversaries of such long-established modern masters as Hindemith, Bartok and Webern, and investigate the growing connections between music and technology. Here's the schedule:Monday, 8:15 p.m.: Chamber music performances by TSU faculty commemorate the 50th anniversaries of the deaths of Webern and Bartok.Tuesday, 8:15 p.m.: New music concert by TSU student composers.Wednesday, noon: Performances of chamber music of Hindemith to celebrate the 100th anniversary of his birth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Anderman and Joan Anderman,Boston Globe | May 29, 2000
In the not-so-distant past, music fans were at the mercy of a thin black platter, encoded -- in what now seems like Pleistocene-era technology -- with songs. Each side offered a sequence of tracks, assembled with much thought by the artist. There was an arc to the album, a mysterious flow in the best of them, that demanded patient listening and many return visits. Songs were like stanzas, memorized in relation to the one that came before and the one after. There were always fussy listeners who manually lifted the turntable arm, painstakingly trying and failing and trying and failing to lay the stylus down in the sliver preceding another track.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 8, 1998
Home recording has always been about tape.Technology has changed quite a lot over the last few decades, as home recorders moved from the clunky open-reel recorders of the '50s to the sophisticated cassette decks of today. But the basic idea was always the same: When Americans wanted to save a sound for posterity, they said, "Let's tape that."Not anymore.Nowadays, when techno-savvy music fans want to copy something, they don't tape -- they burn. That is, they use digital technology to "burn" their own CDs. For them, audiotape is as archaic as steam-powered cars.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | February 23, 2007
SAN DIEGO -- Microsoft Corp. should pay Alcatel-Lucent $1.52 billion, a federal jury said yesterday, deciding that the world's biggest software maker used digital music technology without permission and handing down the largest patent ruling in history. The jury said Microsoft infringed two Alcatel-Lucent patents with its Windows Media Player, including the version in the new Vista operating system. Microsoft pledged to challenge the verdict. The decision allows Alcatel-Lucent, the world's biggest maker of communications equipment, to seek an order barring Microsoft from using the patented technology.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2001
He's amiable and animated, and students at Towson High School say he understands the way their teen-age minds tick. So they can't understand why their principal, Gwendolyn R. Grant, has decided to replace music teacher Jim Walker with an outsider, someone students say won't be able to match his enthusiasm or musical expertise. "Ms. Grant is quick to say that Mr. Walker doesn't have the right leadership skills, but she has never seen him in class. ... She's never seen the way he motivates students," said Sarah Kendall, 18, a 12th-grader who is a member of Towson's vocal ensemble.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Anderman and Joan Anderman,Boston Globe | May 29, 2000
In the not-so-distant past, music fans were at the mercy of a thin black platter, encoded -- in what now seems like Pleistocene-era technology -- with songs. Each side offered a sequence of tracks, assembled with much thought by the artist. There was an arc to the album, a mysterious flow in the best of them, that demanded patient listening and many return visits. Songs were like stanzas, memorized in relation to the one that came before and the one after. There were always fussy listeners who manually lifted the turntable arm, painstakingly trying and failing and trying and failing to lay the stylus down in the sliver preceding another track.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 8, 1998
Home recording has always been about tape.Technology has changed quite a lot over the last few decades, as home recorders moved from the clunky open-reel recorders of the '50s to the sophisticated cassette decks of today. But the basic idea was always the same: When Americans wanted to save a sound for posterity, they said, "Let's tape that."Not anymore.Nowadays, when techno-savvy music fans want to copy something, they don't tape -- they burn. That is, they use digital technology to "burn" their own CDs. For them, audiotape is as archaic as steam-powered cars.
FEATURES
By Lou Carlozo and Lou Carlozo,Chicago Tribune | August 22, 1995
Canton Becker and Matt Moller don't have any gold albums to their credit. They have never headlined a concert and don't even perform their music outside their respective college apartments.Nor are their songs well-known, not even among their classmates at Northwestern University in Chicago. Yet Mr. Becker and Mr. Moller, who became fast friends after meeting last year in a music technology class, may some day be hailed as the John Lennon and Paul McCartney of cyberspace.To date, they have jammed with musicians in England, France, Canada and Norway -- all without leaving Evanston, Ill. -- thanks to their magnum opus, a copyrighted software program.
FEATURES
April 1, 1995
The 20th-Century Music Festival held at Towson State University next week will celebrate the anniversaries of such long-established modern masters as Hindemith, Bartok and Webern, and investigate the growing connections between music and technology. Here's the schedule:Monday, 8:15 p.m.: Chamber music performances by TSU faculty commemorate the 50th anniversaries of the deaths of Webern and Bartok.Tuesday, 8:15 p.m.: New music concert by TSU student composers.Wednesday, noon: Performances of chamber music of Hindemith to celebrate the 100th anniversary of his birth.
FEATURES
By San Francisco Chronicle | January 28, 1993
Headphones looped over her purple beret, a woman bops to the rockabilly beat of guitarist Nick Lowe. Across the aisle, someone enjoys a private audience with bluesman John Lee Hooker.Throughout the aisles and around a horseshoe-shaped bar at Hear, a new Berkeley, Calif., compact disc store, customers decked out in headphones are sampling an eclectic selection of 7,000 recordings.CD players set up beneath the counter allow customers to preview albums. Push a button and hear an album. (In the Baltimore area, An Die Music in Towson offers music sampling.
NEWS
By SHEILA HIMMEL and SHEILA HIMMEL,SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | January 15, 2006
Now you hear it, now you hear it again. That used to be the rule for restaurants' background music. Through the late 1990s and into this millennium, you could go from trattoria to pizza parlor across the nation and hear Rosemary Clooney belting "Mambo Italiano." Fancy steakhouses have forever offered Frank Sinatra on a continuous loop, while at Rosa's Rosticeria in Santa Cruz, Calif., even some margarita drinkers got a little tired of Bob Marley's lilting reggae Legend album. No connection, but Rosa's has since closed.
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