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NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | January 7, 1993
An article in yesterday's Howard County edition of The Sun gave an incorrect location for two new businesses, Crafts Plus and An Die Musik, opening soon in Ellicott City. The stores will operate from a building, formerly occupied by Safeway, at the intersection of Centennial Lane and Frederick Road.The Sun regrets the error.A crafts supply outlet and a music store that allows customers to listen to compact discs before purchasing them are to open in a vacant grocery store building at the Enchanted Forest Shopping Center in Ellicott City.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2011
The boy was 11, already well along in his process of discovering music, when he found himself alone at home one day, listening to a piece by one of history's great romantics. He couldn't explain it, but something in the sounds of Frederic Chopin's Ballade No. 1 in G Minor, Opus 23 — as played by Polish musician Witold Malcuzynsky — struck Brian Ganz like a bolt from stormy skies. "It was mysterious, sort of soulful, and I actually, literally, doubled over in pain," says Ganz, an internationally celebrated concert pianist who lives in Annapolis.
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BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1997
In just about every way, An Die Musik and Jacobs Gardner Supply Co. are opposites.An Die Musik sells entertainment: music for the soul.Jacobs Gardner Supply Co. sells the essentials of work life: pens, copy paper and desks.But the two Maryland businesses, one a music store recently opened on North Charles Street and the other a large office supply business based in Bowie, have much in common.They confronted a common enemy -- the American superstore -- and have undergone significant transformations to stay in business.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | June 1, 2008
iTunes users, beware. Someone's phishing for your personal data online. Technology news source Computerworld Inc. says phishers have targeted users of Apple Inc.'s music store by sending people spam e-mails that tell users that they must correct a problem with their iTunes account. The e-mail includes a link that leads users to a site posing as an iTunes billing update page. The phony page then asks for information, including your credit card number and security code, Social Security number and mother's maiden name.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2003
Ross Warren Hammann, retired co-owner of Hammann Music Co. who managed the company's Towson store, died of heart failure Wednesday at the Blakehurst Life Care Community. He was 87. Mr. Hammann, who was known as Warren, retired in 1970 as manager of the company's branch store in what today is Towson Town Center. The store, located on the mall's lower level between two banks of escalators, was known by shoppers for the impromptu organ concerts performed by representatives of the Hammond and Conn organ companies, whose organs were sold by the music company.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 29, 2003
SAN FRANCISCO - Apple Computer Inc., maker of the iPod portable music player, said yesterday that it is expanding into the music business with an online store where personal computer users can buy songs from the world's five top record companies. The iTunes Music Store will sell digital copies of songs for 99 cents each to users of Apple's Macintosh PCs and iPods, Chief Executive Officer Steven P. "Steve" Jobs said at a news conference. The record companies agreed to sell more than 200,000 songs through Apple.
BUSINESS
By Joseph Menn and Alana Semuels and Joseph Menn and Alana Semuels,Los Angeles Times | May 17, 2007
Amazon is finally taking on Apple. The Seattle-based online retail powerhouse said yesterday that it would open a digital music store with a consumer-friendly twist that, Amazon hopes, will give Apple's iTunes a run for its money. The difference: Customers can do anything they want with the songs they buy. Dealing a blow to a pillar of the recording industry's anti-piracy efforts, Amazon.com Inc. said none of the millions of tracks it planned to sell would be encumbered by software that restricts copying.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1999
How hard could it be to give away $500,000 worth of new pianos? Just ask area music store owner Steve Cohen.Nearly a year ago, he dangled the offer of free instruments before the music directors of three county school systems: Anne Arundel, Baltimore and Howard. Cohen also threw in free delivery and some piano tuning services.Baltimore County politely declined. Howard also said no thanks. Only Arundel expressed interest. Last week -- after extended negotiations with lawyers and school administrators about whether to accept Cohen's proposal -- 19 of 27 new pianos were delivered to Anne Arundel schools.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,sun reporter | December 13, 2006
The first of them appeared at noon on a balmy day in November, young women, mostly, lining up on the brick sidewalk of Thames Street. They had cut work and skipped class to huddle for hours outside a record store for a glimpse of a rock star. The Goo Goo Dolls can have this effect on people. The band has sold more than 10 million albums and played at such storied venues as Radio City Music Hall and the Sydney Opera House. But on this day, the Goos were at the Sound Garden, a scruffy but superb music store in Fells Point.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Dawn C. Chmielewski,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 22, 2004
LAS VEGAS - Sony will launch a new online music store this spring with an exclusive United Airlines promotion that allows those who fly the friendly skies to trade frequent flier miles for free songs. The miles-for-music promotion would generate buzz for the new Sony Connect service at a time when everyone - from giant discounters to specialty coffee brewers - is rushing to sell music downloads. Indeed, this may go down as the year of the great music giveaway as consumer brands tie their products to free digital downloads.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | October 4, 2007
Like a few zillion other customers, I happily log onto Apple's online music store from time to time to exchange a few dollars for a handful of album tracks - sometimes a whole album or two. I don't begrudge Apple a penny of the money I've spent through iTunes. My gripe is with digital rights management (DRM) - the industry's euphemism for copy protection. This is a digital lock that limits the devices on which I can play most iTunes music to a handful of computers and Apple's own iPod portable players.
BUSINESS
By Joseph Menn and Alana Semuels and Joseph Menn and Alana Semuels,Los Angeles Times | May 17, 2007
Amazon is finally taking on Apple. The Seattle-based online retail powerhouse said yesterday that it would open a digital music store with a consumer-friendly twist that, Amazon hopes, will give Apple's iTunes a run for its money. The difference: Customers can do anything they want with the songs they buy. Dealing a blow to a pillar of the recording industry's anti-piracy efforts, Amazon.com Inc. said none of the millions of tracks it planned to sell would be encumbered by software that restricts copying.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,sun reporter | December 13, 2006
The first of them appeared at noon on a balmy day in November, young women, mostly, lining up on the brick sidewalk of Thames Street. They had cut work and skipped class to huddle for hours outside a record store for a glimpse of a rock star. The Goo Goo Dolls can have this effect on people. The band has sold more than 10 million albums and played at such storied venues as Radio City Music Hall and the Sydney Opera House. But on this day, the Goos were at the Sound Garden, a scruffy but superb music store in Fells Point.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun Reporter | December 10, 2006
Sometimes you find a video-store clerk who knows exactly what movie you'll like. Or a clerk in a music store who senses your taste in bands. Or a bookworm who can deliver one terrific novel after another from the shelves. Marc Pickett wants to take luck out of that equation. And win a million dollars in the process. Pickett, a doctoral student at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, is trying to perfect a "recommender." That's a computer program designed to analyze your cinematic tastes and predict what movies you'll like.
NEWS
January 9, 2005
Robert Currie Little, a music and video aficionado who was an associate manager for Record & Tape Traders, died Thursday of melanoma at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 32 and lived in Catonsville. Known as Rob, Mr. Little was a Baltimore native and a 1990 graduate of McDonogh School, where he was active in theater and video productions. He attended Rider College in New Jersey, Catonsville Community College and Towson University, studying video production and mass communication.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | September 2, 2004
SUPPOSE A company asked you to buy a computer based on how much you like its portable music player. Would you bite? For Apple, the tactic might work, and that says a lot about the state of the computer and music industries these days. When Apple announced the third version of its iMac desktop computer this week, it boasted that the machine comes "From the creators of iPod." On the surface, that's like GM pitching a Cadillac Escalade by bragging that it's "From the creators of the turn signal."
BUSINESS
October 23, 1998
Charging that consumers are confused by two retail chains with the same name, Mars Super Markets Inc. is suing Mars the Musician's Planet to get the music super store to drop the name and logo in the Baltimore region.The 56-year-old supermarket chain, with 15 Baltimore-area stores, says in a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court that the music store's use of the name and similar red planet logo infringes on Mars' trademarks, resulting in unfair competition."Mars supermarket is obviously very concerned about protecting the value of its trademark which has been developed in the Baltimore area for decades," said James D. Mathias, the lawyer representing the supermarket chain.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 19, 1997
Do you know anyone who has bought compact disc recordings of singer Foxy Brown or the soundtrack of "Men in Black" on the street since Wednesday?Baltimore County police said yesterday that such information could be valuable in tracking down a suspected serial robber and rapist whose loot in a music store holdup included 15 Foxy Brown CDs and nine copies of the movie soundtrack.It also could prove valuable to anyone providing a lead, since a $2,000 reward has been offered.The gunman who held up a Woodlawn music store also forced three people in the store to undress and two of them to perform a sex act.Police believe the same man robbed and raped a clerk at a Catonsville business Thursday and may be the one who twice robbed a clothing store in Security Square Mall -- on Dec. 22 and July 4, each time forcing people in the store to disrobe down to their underwear.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Dawn C. Chmielewski,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 22, 2004
LAS VEGAS - Sony will launch a new online music store this spring with an exclusive United Airlines promotion that allows those who fly the friendly skies to trade frequent flier miles for free songs. The miles-for-music promotion would generate buzz for the new Sony Connect service at a time when everyone - from giant discounters to specialty coffee brewers - is rushing to sell music downloads. Indeed, this may go down as the year of the great music giveaway as consumer brands tie their products to free digital downloads.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Langberg and Mike Langberg,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 27, 2003
Napster 2.0, the legitimate reincarnation of the outlaw music service shut down by the recording industry two years ago, tries to do so many things at once that it doesn't quite succeed at any of them. Launched Oct. 29, the new Napster (www.napster.com) is an upgrade of the music service previously called pressplay, which started in 2001 and was among the best of the early attempts to sell songs online. But standing still is dangerous in such a rapidly changing field, and Napster's kitty mascot has to contend with a new top cat in town: Apple Computer's elegant iTunes Music Store (www.
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