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September 2, 1992
Baltimore's Jennifer Grimm, the general manager of country music station WPOC-FM 93.1, is bound for Nashville later this month to attend the "Country Music Association Awards Show."Her station has been named Station of the Year in the large-market category in the annual awards show, which is airing Sept. 30 on CBS-TV (Channel 11). This is the second such CMA award for the outlet in three years. WPOC deejay Laurie DeYoung was also among five finalists for the CMA's Broadcast Personality of the Year.
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NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Rob Hiaasen and Stephen Kiehl and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2005
Callers to the new Jack FM in San Diego are greeted by a smug voice with this message: "If you want to request a song, call somebody else. We play what we want." A radio station telling listeners to buzz off would have been heretical a few years ago. Now it's just business. As satellite radio and digital music players like Apple's iPod steal listeners from conventional radio, stations are trying to capture certain elements of those technologies - the variety and random order of the songs.
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NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun Staff Writer | July 14, 1995
Hey, Annapolis Neck Peninsula, you could be hearing Clint Black, Reba McEntire, and the rest of your favorite country music stars all the time, anytime, on WANN 1190 AM, not just when the sun is up.Morris H. Blum, owner of the station, filed an application last month with the Federal Communications Commission to operate hours a day.The country music station has been operating on a sunrise-to-sunset schedule since going on the air Jan. 10, 1947. That could change if the FCC approves Mr. Blum's request.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1998
The voice of Carroll County just got older.Westminster radio station WTTR-AM replaced its lineup of talk shows last week with oldies music programming, but the station will continue to broadcast local news and sports reports, station officials said.The format switch is part of a shake-up initiated by the station's owner, Shamrock Communications of Scranton, Pa.In spite of the changes, WTTR has a strong commitment to local programming, said Dwight Dingle, the station's longtime general manager.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1996
Is this town big enough for two country music stations?WGRX-FM (100.7) sure hopes so. Just two weeks after abandoning its modern-rock format, the Westminster-based station has embraced country music and taken on local media giant WPOC-FM (93.1), consistently the market's No. 1 or No. 2 station.That might seem an odd move, given that WGRX swore off rock because it was never able to make headway against such entrenched competitors as WIYY-FM (97.9), WHFS-FM (99.1) and, to a lesser degree, WOCT-FM (104.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 15, 1995
Public radio listeners have responded to potential federal cutbacks in funding by pledging generously to station fund drives.For example, General Manager Dennis Kita says listeners of WJHU-FM (88.1) "really came through in a big way" during the station's recent spring fund-raiser -- to the tune of almost $127,000 in pledges. The amount, from more than 2,200 callers, nearly doubled the approximately $70,000 raised in last spring's drive, he said."I think the debate on federal funding [of public broadcasting]
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | July 23, 1993
A contract has finally been reached in the previously announced sale of soft rock music WVRT-FM (104.3) to the parent company of rival adult contemporary music station WWMX-FM (106.5).The E. W. Scripps Company, which is selling its radio interests to concentrate on television, said yesterday it will sell Variety 104 to Capitol Broadcasting Company, Inc. of Raleigh, N.C., for $9.75 million.An agreement to sell was announced in mid-June, pending negotiation of final contract details.Yesterday's contract announcement included no word on possible format changes.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 29, 1995
The Baltimore radio ratings race drew closer this past winter, but country music station WPOC-FM (93.1) remained in the top spot, ahead of news/talk WBAL-AM (1090).In the overall Arbitron rankings for the period January through March, for listeners 12 and older, WPOC slid from its record 10.9 share last fall (a share equals about 3,600 listeners in an average quarter-hour) to an 8.1 in the winter. WBAL held steady at a 7.4 share.Light adult contemporary music station WLIF-FM (101.9) made a large gain, rising from the seventh position in the fall to No. 3, with a 6.2 share.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | May 6, 1993
LONDON -- You hear the sappiest stories on that radio station.Like the one about the woman who was taking a shower after a dip in a public swimming pool. She started humming Mimi's part from the first love duet in "La Boheme." Suddenly she heard, through the thin wall from the shower room next door, a strong male tenor starting out on the part of Rodolfo. Next thing you know the two of them were in full flight: Puccini in the nude."Standing there as I was," she said, "gripping my sponge, we went soaring through the entire aria."
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | December 24, 1990
Being named the country's best station by a national organization is certainly good for the ego. It's apparently not bad for the ratings, either.WPOC-FM (93.1), which was named station of the year by the Country Music Association in October, jumped three spots into third place in the fall Birch Radio ratings released last week.The country music station got a 6.9 share of listeners 12 and over, a 1.7 increase from the summer, when the station was ranked sixth in the market. Each share point represents approximately 2,000 listeners in an average quarter hour.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1998
The voice of Carroll County just got older.Westminster radio station WTTR-AM replaced its lineup of talk shows last week with oldies music programming, but the station will continue to broadcast local news and sports reports, station officials said.The format switch is part of a shake-up initiated by the station's owner, Shamrock Communications of Scranton, Pa.In spite of the changes, WTTR has a strong commitment to local programming, said Dwight Dingle, the station's longtime general manager.
FEATURES
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1997
In an unusual ethnic alliance, a black-run Baltimore radio station will begin broadcasting a bilingual, Latin music show tonight."Fiesta Musical," featuring the syncopated sounds of Latin jazz and salsa, will air from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturdays on WEAA-FM (88.9), from the campus of Morgan State University.The program is the brainchild of co-hosts Jose Ruiz and Jorge Austrich, two Latino baby boomers who have enjoyed Latin rhythms since childhood."We want you to put on your dancing shoes, but we're also going to talk about how this music came about," Ruiz said.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1996
Is this town big enough for two country music stations?WGRX-FM (100.7) sure hopes so. Just two weeks after abandoning its modern-rock format, the Westminster-based station has embraced country music and taken on local media giant WPOC-FM (93.1), consistently the market's No. 1 or No. 2 station.That might seem an odd move, given that WGRX swore off rock because it was never able to make headway against such entrenched competitors as WIYY-FM (97.9), WHFS-FM (99.1) and, to a lesser degree, WOCT-FM (104.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun Staff Writer | July 14, 1995
Hey, Annapolis Neck Peninsula, you could be hearing Clint Black, Reba McEntire, and the rest of your favorite country music stars all the time, anytime, on WANN 1190 AM, not just when the sun is up.Morris H. Blum, owner of the station, filed an application last month with the Federal Communications Commission to operate hours a day.The country music station has been operating on a sunrise-to-sunset schedule since going on the air Jan. 10, 1947. That could change if the FCC approves Mr. Blum's request.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 29, 1995
The Baltimore radio ratings race drew closer this past winter, but country music station WPOC-FM (93.1) remained in the top spot, ahead of news/talk WBAL-AM (1090).In the overall Arbitron rankings for the period January through March, for listeners 12 and older, WPOC slid from its record 10.9 share last fall (a share equals about 3,600 listeners in an average quarter-hour) to an 8.1 in the winter. WBAL held steady at a 7.4 share.Light adult contemporary music station WLIF-FM (101.9) made a large gain, rising from the seventh position in the fall to No. 3, with a 6.2 share.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 15, 1995
Public radio listeners have responded to potential federal cutbacks in funding by pledging generously to station fund drives.For example, General Manager Dennis Kita says listeners of WJHU-FM (88.1) "really came through in a big way" during the station's recent spring fund-raiser -- to the tune of almost $127,000 in pledges. The amount, from more than 2,200 callers, nearly doubled the approximately $70,000 raised in last spring's drive, he said."I think the debate on federal funding [of public broadcasting]
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1998
The voice of Carroll County just got older.Westminster radio station WTTR-AM replaced its lineup of talk shows last week with oldies music programming, but the station will continue to broadcast local news and sports reports, station officials said.The format switch is part of a shake-up initiated by the station's owner, Shamrock Communications of Scranton, Pa.In spite of the changes, WTTR has a strong commitment to local programming, said Dwight Dingle, the station's longtime general manager.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1998
The voice of Carroll County just got older.Westminster radio station WTTR-AM replaced its lineup of talk shows last week with oldies music programming, but the station will continue to broadcast local news and sports reports, station officials said.The format switch is part of a shake-up initiated by the station's owner, Shamrock Communications of Scranton, Pa.In spite of the changes, WTTR has a strong commitment to local programming, said Dwight Dingle, the station's longtime general manager.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | July 23, 1993
A contract has finally been reached in the previously announced sale of soft rock music WVRT-FM (104.3) to the parent company of rival adult contemporary music station WWMX-FM (106.5).The E. W. Scripps Company, which is selling its radio interests to concentrate on television, said yesterday it will sell Variety 104 to Capitol Broadcasting Company, Inc. of Raleigh, N.C., for $9.75 million.An agreement to sell was announced in mid-June, pending negotiation of final contract details.Yesterday's contract announcement included no word on possible format changes.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | May 6, 1993
LONDON -- You hear the sappiest stories on that radio station.Like the one about the woman who was taking a shower after a dip in a public swimming pool. She started humming Mimi's part from the first love duet in "La Boheme." Suddenly she heard, through the thin wall from the shower room next door, a strong male tenor starting out on the part of Rodolfo. Next thing you know the two of them were in full flight: Puccini in the nude."Standing there as I was," she said, "gripping my sponge, we went soaring through the entire aria."
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