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By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
About six years ago, the Baltimore rock band Arbouretum played at a club in Chicago for an audience of almost no one. You could count the members of the crowd on one hand, singer/guitarist David Heumann recalled, but one of them happened to be Bettina Richards, the founder of indie record label Thrill Jockey. She liked what she heard. "There literally was nobody there but me," Richards said. "It was great. I totally was hooked. " Richards signed Arbouretum to Thrill Jockey.
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By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | February 11, 2014
Nearly a year of construction and renovation come to an end this Valentine's Day weekend when Torrent Lounge, the nightclub replacing the Recher Theatre on York Road in Towson, opens to provide a thumping heartbeat for Baltimore's electronic music scene. "There hasn't been anything like this in Maryland, ever, from what we've been told by people in the scene," Brian Recher, co-owner of Torrent Lounge, said. The Recher family has owned the former Towson Theatre space since 1959, Brian Recher said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Brandon Weigel | September 16, 2012
If electronic musician Dan Deacon is anything, he is fiercely loyal to his adopted hometown of Baltimore. Last night's sold-out show at the Ottobar wasn't so much a coronation; that ship has long since sailed. Rather, its familiar dance party feel, high energy and many nods to Charm City made it seem more like a warm hug from an old friend. As he and his three-piece backing band worked through old staples and many of the songs from his most recent album, "America," Deacon's performance showed the dynamical qualities of his newest works and the maintained ability to create ecstatic dance parties with manic blasts of electronic noise.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
Part of the charm of Baltimore's arts scene is that someone is always hitting the "refresh" button. An art gallery or music club shuts down on one block, only to have another pop up a few streets over. Abandoned or underused venues might suddenly sprout a theater troupe one day, an artists' collective the next. A lot of the refreshing can be traced to a thriving DIY culture in town, a culture that has been responsible for some of the most intriguing new enterprises over the years and that helps give the city its reputation as a place where artists of every genre can find - or create - an outlet.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | April 20, 1995
Like the bands they cover, the staff of Eleven magazine hopes they're on the verge of making it big.Since the first issue in December, the bimonthly local alternative music magazine has seen its distribution increase from an initial run of 500 copies to 3,000 copies for the April/May issue. The magazine has grown from 12 pages to 20 pages.Now, the staff of Generation X-ers hopes the Brooklyn Park-based magazine, which is available free at clubs and music stores, will rival Lutherville-based Music Monthly as the area's prime local music source.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2005
There won't be a red carpet, and local jewelers won't lend shimmering baubles to the nominees. But Monday's black-tie ceremony announcing the winners of the Washington Area Music Awards - aka the Wammies - is sure to generate local buzz. This year, about one-third of the 700 awards nominations went to bands, artists and producers with Maryland roots. The annual awards program recognizes music professionals on the Washington scene (which is loosely defined to include Virginia and Maryland)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 5, 2001
Eastern Europe has turned out string quartets the way Brazil has produced soccer players. One of the newest and best of them, the Czech Republic's Skampa Quartet, will appear under the aegis of Candlelight Concerts at 8 p.m. tomorrow at Smith Theatre on the campus of Howard Community College. The Skampa is one of the more exciting young string quartets on the international scene today. Founded in 1989 at the Prague Academy of Music, where one of the ensemble's teachers was Milan Skampa of the Smetana Quartet, the Skampa Quartet' was recognized quickly for its excellence when the group won the 1990 Best Quartet at an international competition in Florence, Italy.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1997
It's Saturday night in Annapolis.Tourists emerge from restaurants and saunter toward the water. Impeccably dressed midshipmen sit on benches. And drunken, rowdy 20-somethings pile into bars to bop their heads to the sound of their favorite band.This eclectic mix of visitors and locals is nothing new to Annapolis. Yet, walking down Main Street, a passerby can catch a glimmer of something new emanating from the bars. Music. Foot-thumping, gut-jerking, distinctively original music.Barely five years ago, Annapolis was known as a place to hear cover bands running through the usual play list from "Brown-Eyed Girl" to "Margaritaville."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2011
It's Thursday afternoon, and downtown is awash in live music. Guitar solos shriek through the air, and the crisp snap of snare drums echoes from inside live music clubs. Hundreds of bands are crammed into every nook and cranny, vying to impress the tens of thousands of music lovers and industry folks who swarm the streets. They've come to the Texas capital for the South by Southwest Music and Media Conference (SXSW), a 10-day summit for more than 100,000 on-the-cusp artists, filmmakers and fans that wraps up Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | December 14, 2008
Before the show began, lines of eager concertgoers snaked down the sidewalk outside the club. The crowd of more than 1,000 well-dressed hipsters poured into the space until there was barely room to move - let alone dance. The sold-out concert was the last stop of the hugely successful Baltimore Round Robin Tour, which generated a landslide of glowing press. Dozens of Baltimore musicians banded together and hit the road to showcase different corners of the city's music scene. And fans responded in force: From the stage, Baltimore musician Connor Kizer couldn't see the end of the crowd.
NEWS
November 24, 2012
Across the nation, consumers snapped up TVs, toys and other mass-produced goodies last week, as the holiday shopping season expanded into "Black Thursday" (aka Thanksgiving). But closer to home, authors, artists and musicians have been toiling over works that, given as gifts, are more apt to say, "Baltimore pride" than "Doorbuster special!" In the spirit of local enterprise, we've rounded up locally themed gift ideas that sample the offerings this year from Baltimore's arts and culture scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brandon Weigel | September 16, 2012
If electronic musician Dan Deacon is anything, he is fiercely loyal to his adopted hometown of Baltimore. Last night's sold-out show at the Ottobar wasn't so much a coronation; that ship has long since sailed. Rather, its familiar dance party feel, high energy and many nods to Charm City made it seem more like a warm hug from an old friend. As he and his three-piece backing band worked through old staples and many of the songs from his most recent album, "America," Deacon's performance showed the dynamical qualities of his newest works and the maintained ability to create ecstatic dance parties with manic blasts of electronic noise.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
About six years ago, the Baltimore rock band Arbouretum played at a club in Chicago for an audience of almost no one. You could count the members of the crowd on one hand, singer/guitarist David Heumann recalled, but one of them happened to be Bettina Richards, the founder of indie record label Thrill Jockey. She liked what she heard. "There literally was nobody there but me," Richards said. "It was great. I totally was hooked. " Richards signed Arbouretum to Thrill Jockey.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2012
Susan Elizabeth "Susie" Mudd, the former publisher, editor and owner of the free magazine Music Monthly, which for nearly three decades reported on Mid-Atlantic rock bands and musicians as well as other music, died April 5 of cancer at Sinai Hospital. The longtime Lauraville and Lutherville resident was 56. "Whether Susie realized it or not, she had made her mark on the Mid-Atlantic music scene," said Paul Manna, who worked for Ms. Mudd as a columnist and later in advertising sales.
NEWS
By Dave Rosenthal | February 11, 2012
Right on the heels of the death of journalist and author Jeffrey Zaslow, ("The Last Lecture" and "The Girls from Ames") at age 53, comes the news that Whitney Houston has died, at 48 . Both died much, much too young.  Houston was know for singing, rather than writing. But her roller-coaster life was the stuff of novels. And for readers of a certain age, her music brings back plenty of memories. As the Associated Press obituary noted: "Houston made her album debut in 1985 with 'Whitney Houston,' which sold millions and spawned hit after hit. 'Saving All My Love for You' brought her her first Grammy, for best female pop vocal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2011
In Silver Spring, they've been waiting for it for a decade: a brand-new music venue smack in the middle of the arts district - a rock counterpart to the dignified AFI Silver Theatre and the brainy Discovery complex. When the Fillmore Silver Spring was finally unveiled this month, scores turned up to watch R&B star Mary J. Blige perform. But the 2,000-capacity theater won't just be a new stage - it has the potential to rewrite the landscape for Baltimore and Washington booking agents as well as music lovers.
NEWS
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 20, 1997
What defines a city's musical identity is its clubs. It's not just a matter of taking a town's musical pulse; it has to do with expressing an attitude and defining a style.Maybe that's why the best-known clubs carry a cachet that goes well beyond whoever happens to be playing there at the moment. Think of CBGB's in New York, the Marquee in London, the Troubador in Los Angeles.Think of Hammerjacks.From its spot on South Howard Street beneath the Interstate 395 overpass, Hammerjacks has defined the Baltimore popular music scene for almost a dozen years.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 20, 1997
What defines a city's musical identity is its clubs. It's not just a matter of taking a town's musical pulse; it has to do with expressing an attitude and defining a style.Maybe that's why the best-known clubs carry a cachet that goes well beyond whoever happens to be playing there at the moment. Think of CBGB's in New York, the Marquee in London, the Troubador in Los Angeles.Think of Hammerjacks.From its spot on South Howard Street beneath the Interstate 395 overpass, Hammerjacks has defined the Baltimore popular music scene for almost a dozen years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2011
It's Thursday afternoon, and downtown is awash in live music. Guitar solos shriek through the air, and the crisp snap of snare drums echoes from inside live music clubs. Hundreds of bands are crammed into every nook and cranny, vying to impress the tens of thousands of music lovers and industry folks who swarm the streets. They've come to the Texas capital for the South by Southwest Music and Media Conference (SXSW), a 10-day summit for more than 100,000 on-the-cusp artists, filmmakers and fans that wraps up Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2011
On a chilly Friday night in New York City, Jana Hunter sang a dreamy ballad over a persistent bass line, her quivering voice cradled by the atomic guitar work of her bandmates in Lower Dens. Though it was impossible to tell from their tight set at Rockwood Music Hall, the Baltimore band was exhausted from its marathon of gigs for the CMJ Music Festival, indie music's Schwab's Pharmacy. Every October, musicians from across the globe come to New York to play there, performing at venues across the city before industry cool kids and music critics with hopes of landing a record deal, an agent, a jingle, whatever might snatch them from anonymity.
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