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By Michael Cross-Barnet and By Michael Cross-Barnet | October 29, 2012
From Michael Cross-Barnet: Show of hands, please: How many of you progressive-minded parents out there think it's OK to force a child to take music lessons against his or her will? I'm guessing not too many. Maybe 10 or 15 percent? OK, let's add a few nuances. What if the kid is good - really good? What if the lessons in question are not only high quality, but free? Now, here's the kicker, and this will bring a glimmer of recognition in more than a few readers: What if the child in question is one who rarely, if ever, is willing to try new things without prompting?
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2012
Marshall C. "Marsh" Anders Jr., a retired music teacher, pianist and church organist who headed the music department at McDonogh School for nearly 50 years, died Nov. 15 of a stroke at the Brightview Mays Chapel retirement community. He was 90. "Marsh was quite amazing. He was at home with classical music, jazz and all of the American standards. He could play any song in any key. He was incredible," said Philip A. Olsen, who is head of choral music at McDonogh's upper school.
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By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
Kyle Boyce takes a guitar lesson in Chicago every Wednesday night — with a teacher in Toronto. No traveling is involved. Instead, Boyce fires up a computer, plugs in his electric guitar and launches into a live music lesson with his instructor on Bandhappy.com, a new Baltimore-based website that aims to bring such lessons to the masses. "I was super-skeptical about it at first," said Boyce, 27, who is a guitarist in a band called Unvisioned. "But after my first lesson, I was hooked.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2012
My husband and I had a parent-teacher conference at his preschool the other day, during which we realized Isaac is showing a great interest in numbers and how they work. We'd noticed some of that at home (counting things, making patterns, asking -- and figuring out -- some sums on his own). But his teacher had some scraps of paper she'd saved, including a couple where he'd done his own math problems. I'm a Word Person, not so much a numbers person. Not that I dislike math, but I just don't think about it that much.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | January 11, 1993
A dozen boys and girls sat on the floor in a circle, first wiggling their toes, and then their feet, legs and arms, to the tempo of music. They stood, stretching for the sky.The children, all students at the Columbia Academy, a private school, were next led through a series of jumping, hopping and skipping exercises by their instructor.They appeared to have a good time as they demonstrated for an audience of about 60 people yesterday what they have learned from music and dance instruction.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 6, 2000
The Annapolis Symphony Orchestra seems to be a victim of its own success, encouraging so many county schoolchildren to sign up to study music that there is a shortage of instruments available free to kids whose families can't afford the rental fees. In May, the orchestra instituted an education program called the Music Van, which visits third-graders, encouraging them to participate in their school's music education program. In six weeks, the van traveled to 13 area elementary schools, giving children a "hands-on experience" with instruments.
FEATURES
By Bill Hendrick and Bill Hendrick,Cox News Service | October 7, 1994
Fran Rauscher doesn't touch her cello anymore. It did weird things to her mind.It transformed her from a child prodigy into a prodigious research scientist who, at 36, is out to convince anyone within earshot of her lilting voice that music is a key to unlocking hidden secrets about the brain.In short, by studying groups of toddlers and college students, Ms. Rauscher and colleagues at the University of California-Irvine's Center for Neurobiology of Learning have shown that people can enhance some higher brain functions by playing or even just listening to music.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2012
My husband and I had a parent-teacher conference at his preschool the other day, during which we realized Isaac is showing a great interest in numbers and how they work. We'd noticed some of that at home (counting things, making patterns, asking -- and figuring out -- some sums on his own). But his teacher had some scraps of paper she'd saved, including a couple where he'd done his own math problems. I'm a Word Person, not so much a numbers person. Not that I dislike math, but I just don't think about it that much.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1998
He was known to the world as Eubie Blake, the ragtime pianist and composer who was the son of former slaves and went from playing in East Baltimore bawdy houses and saloons to the footlights of Broadway.He was the co-author of "Shuffle Along," the first black musical comedy to be performed on the Great White Way in 1921.Born James Hubert Blake in 1883, the son of a stevedore and a laundress, he was reared in a house at 319 Forrest St.He was 6 years old when he wandered away from his mother on South Broadway and stepped into a music shop, where he became fascinated with a pump organ.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | May 4, 1997
IN HIGH SCHOOL I was a fanatical horn player, mostly for nonmusical reasons.One, we had a music director named Mr. Mars, who had worked with the big bands in his youth and who inspired me to work harder than I ever thought possible at mastering the technical intricacies of the slide trombone.The other reason was an enchanting flutist who sat opposite the brass section in band class. She made eyes at me for three years running, and as a consequence I never missed a band rehearsal, ever.So I was astounded to read recently that school officials in Fairfax County, Va., were thinking of eliminating instrumental music and band from the daily schedule to make more room for "core" subjects such as science and math.
FEATURES
By Michael Cross-Barnet and By Michael Cross-Barnet | October 29, 2012
From Michael Cross-Barnet: Show of hands, please: How many of you progressive-minded parents out there think it's OK to force a child to take music lessons against his or her will? I'm guessing not too many. Maybe 10 or 15 percent? OK, let's add a few nuances. What if the kid is good - really good? What if the lessons in question are not only high quality, but free? Now, here's the kicker, and this will bring a glimmer of recognition in more than a few readers: What if the child in question is one who rarely, if ever, is willing to try new things without prompting?
NEWS
August 31, 2012
'Legally Blonde' The final show of the musical comedy based on the hit movie starring Reese Witherspoon runs Sunday, Sept. 2 at Toby's Dinner Theatre, 5900 Symphony Woods Road. Tickets are $34.50-$53. Information: 410-995-1969. 'Color Purple' musical The Pulitzer Prize-winning story, which starred Oprah Winfrey and Whoopi Goldberg on the big screen, tells of one woman's triumph over adversity Thursday-Saturday, Sept. 6-8 at Toby's Dinner Theatre, 5900 Symphony Woods Road.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
Kyle Boyce takes a guitar lesson in Chicago every Wednesday night — with a teacher in Toronto. No traveling is involved. Instead, Boyce fires up a computer, plugs in his electric guitar and launches into a live music lesson with his instructor on Bandhappy.com, a new Baltimore-based website that aims to bring such lessons to the masses. "I was super-skeptical about it at first," said Boyce, 27, who is a guitarist in a band called Unvisioned. "But after my first lesson, I was hooked.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2012
It's not often in judging the biography of a great artist that you can just pick up the phone and call one of the people who knew him best - and remains a principal keeper of the historical flame. But that is exactly the case with Cab Calloway, the Baltimore-raised jazz bandleader, singer and actor who is profiled in TV's "American Masters" series at 10 p.m. Monday on PBS. Camay Calloway Murphy, the performer's daughter, lives here and is happy to talk about her late father and how she feels he is treated in "American Masters Cab Calloway: Sketches.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 24, 2011
Richard Lyle "Dick" Daniel, a retired Baltimore County public school music instructor who played with and led several jazz bands, died Monday of heart failure at Holy Spirit Hospital in Camp Hill, Pa. The longtime Finksburg resident was 79. The son of a paper mill worker and a homemaker, Mr. Daniel was born and raised in West Point, Va., where he graduated in 1950 from West Point High School. He served in the Air Force until 1951, when he was given an honorable medical discharge.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | February 24, 2011
As we watch rebellion roll through the Middle East and in Wisconsin — propelled by Facebook and Twitter — parents have to be wondering what their own kids are up to about now. Considering the amount of time our children spend on their social networks — and how removed those conversations are from our prying eyes — they could be fomenting revolution right under our noses and we, like the oppressive oligarchs teetering all over the place, wouldn't...
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1996
Common Ground, a music and arts festival at Western Maryland College, will culminate this weekend with concerts featuring a mixture of blues, bluegrass, jazz and gospel.Musicians and artists with backgrounds as varied as their styles will celebrate black, white and Native American traditions. Dancers and cloggers will step to the beat of African drums and Appalachian fiddles. Dulcimers, harmonicas, banjos and guitars will create the harmony that is the theme of this year's festival.After a week of classes in a plethora of subjects, students and teachers now will show off what they have learned from each other.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | February 24, 2011
As we watch rebellion roll through the Middle East and in Wisconsin — propelled by Facebook and Twitter — parents have to be wondering what their own kids are up to about now. Considering the amount of time our children spend on their social networks — and how removed those conversations are from our prying eyes — they could be fomenting revolution right under our noses and we, like the oppressive oligarchs teetering all over the place, wouldn't...
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2010
He was married, the proud father of three. He'd founded a construction company that was doing well, even in the midst of a recession. And after years of working what he calls "32-hour days," Michael Pomory was even finding time for a hobby he'd dropped years before: jamming with friends on his guitar. "I really thought I'd found a groove that would last the rest of my life," says Pomory, a South Baltimore native, in a voice made gravelly from years of smoking. Then he lost it all. Even now, it's hard to grasp how so much hard luck could hit one person in a single year: the divorce, the foundering of the company, the depression that set in and wouldn't go away.
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