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NEWS
By Arizona Republic | April 22, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Congressional crooning about reform changed keys when select big shots got a chance to score Barbra Streisand tickets.Thanks to music-industry officials, whose livelihood often depends on what Congress does, eight lawmakers and 38 staffers bought tickets to Ms. Streisand's May 12 concert in suburban Washington at face value.When tickets went on sale a few weeks ago for Ms. Streisand's first concert tour in more than 25 years, thousands of ordinary fans around the nation spent hours camping out for ducats only to leave empty-handed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
"Can I crash on the couch for the weekend / I broke lease and I get no sleep 'cause I'm in too deep," raps the Columbia native Dunson on his new single, "Broke Ass Dope Ass Rapper. " You can watch the video above. The track - which finds Dunson rapping about the struggles to make it in the music industry - was produced by the MC and his frequent collaborators the Phatboiz. It will be featured on his forthcoming release, "Outlier" (due in September). I featured Dunson, a former Baltimore financial advisor, in my 2012 feature on city rappers on the rise . Since then, he's been featured on a single by R&B singer Chrisette Michele ( "Can the Cool Be Loved?"
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FEATURES
By Vera Eidelman and Vera Eidelman,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2004
Winning a credit card contest was an experience for Brian Bauer, 20, a junior at the University of Maryland. In fact, it was priceless. For the past five weeks, Bauer worked with the Universal Music and Video Department and learned from leading music and entertainment industry experts in Los Angeles. And, he helped produce two music videos for the Hoobastank song "Same Direction." "We had our hand in everything; they worked us like dogs. But, at the same time, it didn't feel like work because it was so interesting," he recalls.
NEWS
By Dan Singer | May 12, 2014
This summer, Laurel's teenage musicians will have an opportunity to share their talents with community members and industry professionals at the second annual Laurel Youth Music Showcase. The showcase, an open mic concert series run jointly by the Laurel Department of Parks and Recreation and local production company Breasia Studios, will be held every Thursday night from June 5 to July 24 at Granville Gude Park. Each concert goes from 6 to 8 p.m., and participants between the ages of 13 and 19 can sign up to perform starting at 5:15 p.m. They can choose to play any cover or original song as long as it has appropriate lyrics.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | April 5, 2007
When Steve Jobs, Apple's CEO-for-life, shocked the music industry in February by calling for an end to sales of copy-protected music, the cynics smiled. And I was among them. Here was a guy who had made hundreds of millions peddling copy-protected songs and the gadgets that play them. Was this just another case of the master showman blowing smoke to keep critics and regulators at bay? Not this time. Jobs backed up his rhetoric with action this week, announcing a ground-breaking deal with London-based EMI Group, one of the four large conglomerates that dominate the recording industry.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | July 11, 1991
In a landmark accord that should open the floodgates to a wave of new music-recording technologies, electronics manufacturers have agreed to pay royalties to the music industry on the sale of all digital home-recording equipment.The agreement, which will be formally announced today and requires congressional approval, will end a battle that began four years ago with the advent of digital audiotape technology.By using the ones and zeros of computer code to record music, digital audiotape provides not only compact-disc-quality sound on a tape but also allows anyone to make perfect copies from CDs or from other digital tapes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Heather Newman and Heather Newman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 3, 2003
Go ahead and sue, thousands of Internet users told the Recording Industry Association of America: We're still going to download music files. Grokster, one of the largest services where people swap songs, said last week that there had been no change in the number of people sharing files or the number of files being traded, despite RIAA's threats last month to sue people who share copyrighted music. Wayne Rosso, president of the service, was clearly pleased by the strong support from Grokster's users.
NEWS
By Fredric Dannen | June 29, 1999
A REVOLUTION has occurred in the way music is distributed, and the big record companies are in a state of panic. With an abundance of music now available free on the Internet, the major labels have essentially lost control of their catalogs. But they are not casualties of new technology so much as victims of their own arrogance.These days, it's possible for anyone with Web access to download hours of music in an audio format known as MP3. The downloaded music is of surprisingly good sound quality and can be played out of computer speakers or on a special portable player.
BUSINESS
By Joseph Menn and Jon Healey and Joseph Menn and Jon Healey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 24, 2003
Two years after music industry lawyers pounded Napster Inc. into submission, the major record companies are pointing fingers at each other over the flourishing of online music piracy. Universal Music Group, EMI Music and a cadre of publishers blame Bertelsmann AG, saying the German media giant abetted copyright infringement by supporting Napster financially in 2000 and 2001. Bertelsmann says its accusers are at least partly responsible because they missed the chance to turn Napster's song-stealing users into paying customers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | October 30, 2005
His ears are among the most important in the music industry. Often, they'll determine which, if any, of the 40 new CDs he receives each day you might one day listen to. But sometimes even Kevin Liles' ears need help. So the Warner Music Group executive resorts to a tactic he learned two decades ago as a performer on the Baltimore music circuit: He opens the doors to his New York office, plants his stereo speakers facing outward and pumps up the volume until it pulsates loud enough to unhinge the doors.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
Pamela Audrey Hall, a former radio station program director who was active nationally in jazz and contemporary gospel music circles, died of cancer Jan. 21 at St. Agnes Hospital. She was 57 and lived in Ellicott City. She was named Black Radio's Music Director of the Year in 1992. Billboard Magazine also nominated her as music director of the year. Born in Philadelphia, she was the daughter of Dr. William Martin Hall, a gynecologist at Sinai Hospital and the old Lutheran and Provident hospitals, who was a founder of the Garwyn Medical Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
A celebration 15 years in the making will bring an Annapolis rock group full circle on Friday night. Jimmie's Chicken Shack, the eclectic rock group best known for its singles “Do Right” and “High,” will commemorate the anniversary of its second and most recognizable album, “Bring Your Own Stereo,” by playing the record's 13 tracks in order for the first time ever. For James Davies, the 45-year-old frontman better known as Jimi HaHa, the fact that a Rams Head venue will host the show makes it even more special.
NEWS
SPECIAL TO THE AEGIS | August 2, 2013
Like many 18-year-olds, Piper Bateman, of Fallston recently graduated from high school and is preparing to enter college in the fall, but before she starts classes, Bateman plans to shoot a music video. Working with Baltimore-based filmmaker Jane Hollon, Bateman is finalizing the selection of shooting locations, costumes and other details for the shooting of the video of her original song, "Finally a Refugee. " Bateman and Hollon set out to raise the $2,000 needed for production of the video through an online pledge campaign.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2013
Toby Bozzuto seemed headed for a career in the music industry. The son of Thomas S. Bozzuto, a founding partner of developer The Bozzuto Group, Toby Bozzuto interned for Blues Traveler in college, working in the band's management office in Carnegie Hall. Then for two summers he worked for Sony Music Entertainment's college music division, handling grass-roots marketing in upstate New York from his dorm room. "My fraternity brothers loved the boxes and boxes of CDs I got every day," Bozzuto said.
BUSINESS
by Dana Amihere | April 17, 2013
CD players are going the way of the ashtray, roll-down windows and whitewall tires. Chevrolet is the latest to join the ranks of automakers like Ford who have ditched physical media players in favor of music streamed through onboard systems and auxillary music devices like smartphones and iPods. While reasons for the change are speculative and varied, many industry experts agree that the CD player is literally dead weight. Weighing in at about five pounds, manufacturers are looking for any way they can to slim down autos' bodies in favor of maximum fuel efficiency.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
After Brandy Norwood gave birth to her daughter, Sy'rai, 10 years ago, she was exhausted and ready to leave the entertainment world behind. "I was like, 'I'm good, y'all. I'm good on the music industry,' " Brandy said in a recent interview. "I didn't know who I was, but my daughter was a savior for me. " Motherhood may have eventually refocused her, but the music industry requires hit songs. Although she released two more albums after Sy'rai's birth (2004's "Afrodisiac" and 2008's "Human")
BUSINESS
By Michelle Payne and Michelle Payne,Special to Baltimoresun.com | July 19, 2004
Breaking into the music industry could be a lot like trying to go over Niagara Falls in a barrel -- it's a feat attempted by many, but successful for only a select few. The cut-throat competition, a surplus of questionable recording outlets and much red tape could rip apart an aspiring artist's dreams, said Frances McIver, president and CEO of SOAC Entertainment Inc. in Baltimore. To give artists better insight on the music business, SOAC is sponsoring an "Entrepreneurial Music Seminar" from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday at the University of Baltimore's Langsdale Auditorium.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | August 23, 2007
Having spent last week on vacation sans Internet, I had to wait until today to extend a slightly belated happy 25th birthday to a gadget that forever changed the way we entertain ourselves. On Aug. 17, 1982, the first compact disk (or disc) rolled off a German production line, paving the way for a generation of devices that can now cram a thousand hours of hours of music or more into a box the size of deck of cards. The technology that made the CD possible has also changed the dynamic of the music business - including the role of artists, the companies who market their music, and those of us who listen to it. Ironically, that same technology now threatens to make the CD irrelevant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2012
When young, aspiring artists ask Mark Foster, the 27-year-old leader of Los Angeles trio Foster the People, for tips on making it big in the music industry, he offers practical advice. "Kids hit me up on Twitter and I tell them to learn how to bartend," Foster said. "There are career waiters in Los Angeles and they're making over $100,000 a year. " Foster knows first-hand how difficult breakthroughs can be. After moving to Los Angeles from Cleveland at 18, Foster threw himself into the city's party scene, hoping to make any connections he could.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2011
The B-52s were performing another one of their New Year's Eve shows when, right after "Roam," they were asked to stop for the countdown, champagne toasts and balloons. It might have been 2011, but the band finished the night in typical garb — singer Fred Schneider in a gold jacket, the gals in sparkly minidresses — and with a couple of classics, "Rock Lobster" and "Love Shack," just like they might have 30 years ago. That they're still playing them is further proof that the Athens, Ga., veterans have yet to overstay their welcome.
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