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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 15, 2002
Modern music is not the only kind that can be startle the aural nerves. Centuries-old stuff can do the same thing. Such was the case Sunday afternoon with an ear-opening presentation of Gluck's Orphee et Euridice, one of the glories of the 18th century, by Opera Lafayette and the University of Maryland's Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. The remarkable venture provided further evidence, not that any more is needed, of how valuable the "authenticity movement" is, how great its legacy of attempting to re-create performance practices of distant times.
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Gus G. Sentementes | May 16, 2012
Online education is a hot trend at the moment. But within that trend, there's an increasingly hotter sub-trend: online music education. Baltimore's Connections Academy , one of the bigger players in online K-12 education in the country, today announced that it's partnering with the Juilliard School in New York City to deliver online music education to pre-college students beginning this fall. The program is called Juilliard E-Learning. [My observation: This is a heckuva smart move by Juilliard, to extend its brand online to youngsters in K-12.
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NEWS
March 24, 1996
Robert Hall Lewis, 69, classical composerRobert Hall Lewis, perhaps the premier classical composer living in Baltimore, died Friday of pneumonia at the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center. He was 69.Dr. Lewis had long been admired for the complexity and #F TC intelligence of his work attributes that also make his compositions extremely difficult, even impenetrable, for some casual listeners."His compositions are lean and elegant, exhibiting a clarity of form and masterful orchestration," said Geoffrey Wright, a professor of music at the Peabody Institute and a former student of Dr. Lewis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
Born 200 years ago on Oct. 22, Franz Liszt changed music history. Even if the Hungarian-born pianist/composer had not done so, people would probably still remember him, if only for his romances. There was the dancer, Lola, who got so mad when Liszt tired of her that she followed him from city to city, finally crashing a banquet given in his honor and boogieing on a table in front of a startled crowd. And Olga, who, likewise faced with Liszt's waning affections, disguised herself as a gardener and burst into his villa ready to stab him. She settled for one more bout of lovemaking that night, but soon hounded him again, this time with a revolver and poison.
NEWS
October 2, 2005
Tim Smith Tim Smith is The Sun's classical music critic. He was born in Washington, D.C., and received a master's degree in music history from Occidental College, Los Angeles. He is the author of The NPR Curious Listener's Guide to Classical Music, published in 2002. For UniSun, he writes about the off-season life of one of the Soulful Symphony's talented members. Tanika White A journalist for 10 years, Tanika White covers fashion, style and beauty for The Sun. Before that, she covered education and schools.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | May 16, 2012
Online education is a hot trend at the moment. But within that trend, there's an increasingly hotter sub-trend: online music education. Baltimore's Connections Academy , one of the bigger players in online K-12 education in the country, today announced that it's partnering with the Juilliard School in New York City to deliver online music education to pre-college students beginning this fall. The program is called Juilliard E-Learning. [My observation: This is a heckuva smart move by Juilliard, to extend its brand online to youngsters in K-12.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 24, 2001
The most surreal event in music history must surely be the one that occurred in a prisoner-of-war camp known as Stalag 8A on Jan. 15, 1941. Five thousand soldiers, who had been fighting Nazi armies just months before, gathered to hear the premiere of a long, complex chamber work called "Quartet for the End of Time." It was written by one of their own, Olivier Messiaen, who was inspired to write the piece after he discovered a violinist, cellist and clarinetist in the camp. (He was the pianist.
FEATURES
By Michael Saunders and Michael Saunders,The Boston Globe | January 26, 1994
First, let's set some ground rules. This is "Face the Music," the latest album by New Kids on the Block, now known as NKOTB.Anyone looking for deep, meaningful lyrics that linger in the mind should probably look elsewhere. No new ground is broken, no styles set. There's no revolution to be marked in the annals of music history. As Donnie Wahlberg put it: "This is just music, this is just entertainment. Take it for what it is."And this is pop, 1994 style, which means the talent of the performers is secondary to the talent of the producers playing the studio switches.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | August 13, 1998
Even though Shania Twain's "The Woman In Me" was one of the biggest albums in country music history (to date, it has sold more than 7 million copies), the singer never went on tour to support the album.That wasn't an oversight, either. "There are a couple of reasons why I didn't tour on the first album," she said last fall. "One of them was that I wouldn't have had enough songs, really, collectively, to make a true headlining show. And to me, that's a big reason."That's not a problem now. Thanks to her current album, "Come On Over," Twain has more than enough material to fill a show.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Music Critic | November 5, 2000
When filmmaker Ken Burns set out to make "Jazz," his 10-part series on this most American of art forms, it wasn't just an exercise in music history. Just as he addressed larger issues of American culture and history in his award-winning films "The Civil War" and "Baseball," he sees "Jazz" as a lens through which the larger American experience can be viewed. " 'Jazz' is an opportunity to see how we are as a people," he says over the phone from his offices in New Hampshire. "In many ways, I've made the same film over and over again, just asking that question of different subjects.
NEWS
August 8, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS Top heavy What sort of fellow is Baltimore's new schools chief? Not the sort, it seems, to ask some really tough questions, such as: Why does school administration here cost so much? Maryland baltimoresun.com/kane Signing bonus? The celebrity autograph is a strange thing, speaking from the personal experience of asking Tony Danza for one. Today baltimoresun.com/cowherd OTHER VOICES Glenn McNatt on new show at Grimaldis -- Today Jay Hancock on a bad energy offer -- business 5 THINGS TO DO TODAY Beyonce in Baltimore -- Grammy-winning recording artist Beyonce at 1st Mariner Arena, 201 W. Baltimore St. 7:30 p.m. $57.75-$198.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | January 18, 2007
You might say that the musical Bricktop was born in a trunk. The trunk had belonged to an African-American singer named Ada "Bricktop" Smith and was purchased a few years ago by the library at Atlanta's Emory University, which is where native Baltimore playwright Calvin A. Ramsey saw it. Ramsey had never heard of the singer, but when he started going through her trunk, he says, "I saw all these telegrams from Cole Porter, letters from Arlene Francis and...
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,special to the sun | November 3, 2006
A panorama of American life from the 1890s to about 1914, presented against a background of the popular music of that period. That's Tintypes, which Rep Stage is performing through Nov. 19 in Howard Community College's new black box theatre. Conceived by Mary Kyte, Mel Marvin and Gary Pearle, the show is a mixture of history, social commentary and nostalgia. The score includes old favorites such as "Meet Me in St. Louis," "In My Merry Oldsmobile," "A Bird in a Gilded Cage" and "Bill Bailey, Won't You Please Come Home."
NEWS
October 2, 2005
Tim Smith Tim Smith is The Sun's classical music critic. He was born in Washington, D.C., and received a master's degree in music history from Occidental College, Los Angeles. He is the author of The NPR Curious Listener's Guide to Classical Music, published in 2002. For UniSun, he writes about the off-season life of one of the Soulful Symphony's talented members. Tanika White A journalist for 10 years, Tanika White covers fashion, style and beauty for The Sun. Before that, she covered education and schools.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2004
With headlining acts such as hip-hop legend LL Cool J and R&B duo Ashford & Simpson, the organizers of this month's African American Heritage Festival hope to draw more than a half-million visitors to the three-day cultural celebration. Mayor Martin O'Malley joined Kweisi Mfume , head of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, yesterday to announce that the 28-year-old event, formerly known as AFRAM, will be held June 18-20 at Oriole Park. The free celebration of African-American art, culture and history will include 35 music performances, bookmobiles, historic artifacts from churches and libraries, carnival rides and oral history sessions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff | May 9, 2004
Earl Wilson, a tall, elegant guitar player, launched what would be a daylong song and history trek through West Baltimore with a jazzy romp through My Funny Valentine. He told his audience at the Arch Social Club that My Funny Valentine is a ballad. "We like to put a little blues in it," he said. "Some ballads are blues. Some ballads talk about the woman you used to have and the misery that caused. Some blues talk about the woman you're gong to get and the misery that'll cause." "The ladies have the blues also," he said.
NEWS
August 8, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS Top heavy What sort of fellow is Baltimore's new schools chief? Not the sort, it seems, to ask some really tough questions, such as: Why does school administration here cost so much? Maryland baltimoresun.com/kane Signing bonus? The celebrity autograph is a strange thing, speaking from the personal experience of asking Tony Danza for one. Today baltimoresun.com/cowherd OTHER VOICES Glenn McNatt on new show at Grimaldis -- Today Jay Hancock on a bad energy offer -- business 5 THINGS TO DO TODAY Beyonce in Baltimore -- Grammy-winning recording artist Beyonce at 1st Mariner Arena, 201 W. Baltimore St. 7:30 p.m. $57.75-$198.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
Born 200 years ago on Oct. 22, Franz Liszt changed music history. Even if the Hungarian-born pianist/composer had not done so, people would probably still remember him, if only for his romances. There was the dancer, Lola, who got so mad when Liszt tired of her that she followed him from city to city, finally crashing a banquet given in his honor and boogieing on a table in front of a startled crowd. And Olga, who, likewise faced with Liszt's waning affections, disguised herself as a gardener and burst into his villa ready to stab him. She settled for one more bout of lovemaking that night, but soon hounded him again, this time with a revolver and poison.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 15, 2002
Modern music is not the only kind that can be startle the aural nerves. Centuries-old stuff can do the same thing. Such was the case Sunday afternoon with an ear-opening presentation of Gluck's Orphee et Euridice, one of the glories of the 18th century, by Opera Lafayette and the University of Maryland's Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. The remarkable venture provided further evidence, not that any more is needed, of how valuable the "authenticity movement" is, how great its legacy of attempting to re-create performance practices of distant times.
FEATURES
By Susan King and Susan King,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 29, 2001
PBS ushered in 2001 with Ken Burns' lavish 18-hour exploration of Jazz. And, beginning tonight, the network offers up American Roots Music, a four-part series exploring such unique American music forms as blues, gospel, country, bluegrass, Cajun, zydeco and folk. "It was just quite accidental that both" - Jazz and American Roots Music - "happened around the same time," says executive producer and director Jim Brown, an Emmy Award winner responsible for the acclaimed music documentaries The Weavers: Wasn't That a Time!
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