Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMusic Hall
IN THE NEWS

Music Hall

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 25, 1999
The Chesapeake Music Hall took its 15-member cast of singing and dancing actors and a sound and light crew on the road Saturday to do excerpts from a dozen Broadway shows for the Performing Arts Association of Linthicum, and PAAL never looked or sounded better.That's at least partly the work of lighting and sound designer Garrett Hyde, technician Karel Richardson and light man Greg Guthman, who turned the auditorium at North County High School into a cabaret for this show.Music hall owner, general manager, director, choreographer and costumer Sherry Kay provided costumes for "Mame," "Annie Get Your Gun," "South Pacific," "Oklahoma," "Fiddler on the Roof," "Damn Yankees," "Little Shop of Horrors" and "42nd Street" and assisted with split-second changes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
"Brief Encounter," David Lean's 1945 movie based on a Noel Coward play about a thwarted romance, has long been spoken of with great reverence and routinely accorded four-star status. Personally, I'd shave off a half a star, if only because the soundtrack is so overstuffed with Rachmaninoff's surging, sighing Piano Concerto No. 2. Still, count me among those who treasure the film. Count me, too, among those who find much to savor in the theatrical version of "Brief Encounter," created by the U.K.-based troupe called Kneehigh in 2008.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 2002
Charles Dickens' miserly curmudgeon, who is visited by ghosts of the past, present and future on Christmas Eve, has held unique appeal since he was introduced in 1843. Gaining added musical charm recently, Ebenezer Scrooge now rivals Santa Claus as a holiday favorite. Like Santa, Scrooge is ubiquitous at holiday time, popping up simultaneously at several locations. One singing Scrooge opened Saturday to a full house at Chesapeake Music Hall. Another opens tonight at Colonial Players and a third opens at Chesapeake Arts Center tomorrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Anthony Landi, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2013
"Hold on. I'm in a weird place," said Zach Williams, leader of The Lone Bellow, as he lost reception while passing through a mountain range over the phone on Wednesday. That "weird place" could also be applied to his music career at the moment. The Brooklyn Americana trio is in a transitional phase, shifting from indie darlings to the next big thing. What started as a creative outlet for Williams has become a full-fledged (and critically acclaimed) band, which resulted in the members quitting their day jobs to play Austin, Texas' annual South by Southwest festival and take up music full-time.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
The Chesapeake Music Hall -- the only dinner theater in Annapolis -- will let the curtain fall on its last performance at the end of this month, succumbing to competitive pressure after 15 years. The music hall, just off U.S. 50 a few miles west of the Bay Bridge, has been managed by Sherry Kay Anderson for the past five years after she and her then-husband, Doug Yetter, purchased it in 1995. The facility had two previous owners, both of whom declared bankruptcy. Anderson was unavailable for comment yesterday.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 24, 1997
A review of "A Chorus Line" at Chesapeake Music Hall in the July 24 Arundel edition of The Sun misspelled an actor's name. Her name is Andrea Elward. Also, two characters in the show, Bobby and Mark, became conflated in the editing process.The Sun regrets the errors.Chesapeake Music Hall, which just presented one milestone in musical theater history, "Oklahoma!," has opened another.With "A Chorus Line," the company has moved from the first show to integrate songs into a plot to move the action to a landmark concept musical, with neither story nor stars.
NEWS
By Pat Shipley Hook and Pat Shipley Hook,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 20, 1996
The Chesapeake Music Hall's production of "Mame" deserves great acclaim.For a ma-and-pa troupe to come up with a production as good as this one is miraculous. And much of the miracle work is done by Sherry Kay, who not only plays the title role with aplomb but also is co-producer, choreographer and costumer.Kay's Mame shows softness as well as strength. She is gorgeous in stunning gowns and the other costumes, and dance numbers are impressive.Based on the novel "Auntie Mame" by Patrick Dennis, the show tells the story of a 10-year-old boy sent to live with an aunt whose idea of child-rearing includes teaching youngsters to mix martinis and dance the tango in a speakeasy.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 15, 1998
Chesapeake Music Hall resumes its "Jazz At The Music Hall" series at 8 p.m. Sunday with a re-creation of clarinetist Benny Goodman's famous January 1938 Carnegie Hall concert.This first concert of the new year celebrates the first time jazz was played in the venerable hall in New York.Drummer Brooks Tegler leads a 13-piece orchestra that will perform everything heard that evening, from the opening "Don't Be That Way" to the closing "Sing, Sing, Sing.""Jazz At The Music Hall" is produced by jazz writer and broadcaster John Tegler, who will narrate the concert and tell how Goodman's orchestra was booked on a stage that had been considered too august for jazz musicians.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2000
When composer Irving Berlin penned "There's No Business Like Show Business" in 1945, he could hardly have imagined how amazing show business would become 40 years later. In 1984, Dan Coggin, a former Jesuit who designed greeting cards featuring nuns, decided to do a little show based on the adventures of five nuns that he figured would last for four performances. Those four shows expanded to 38 weeks. "Nunsense" has played continuously somewhere from coast to coast and abroad since its debut in New York City.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 5, 1997
Chesapeake Music Hall pays tribute Sunday to legendary jazz vocalist Billie Holiday in the fifth of its Jazz At the Music Hall series of concerts.Ronnie Wells, one of the top jazz singers in the Baltimore-Washington area, portrays Holiday. Wells is backed by her husband, Ron Elliston, and his quartet,Wells, who teaches jazz vocal techniques at the University of Maryland, has been a frequent performer at U.S. and international jazz festivals, appearing throughout Europe and North and South America.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jake Fewster and Midnight Sun contributor | July 23, 2012
After performing a free acoustic set at Fells Point's Sound Garden record store on Friday, New Jersey-based quartet the Gaslight Anthem performed to a sold-out crowd at Washington's U Street Music Hall. Intern Jake Fewster had this report: The U Street Music Hall lights went out and Fugazi's “Waiting Room” blasted through the speakers as the Gaslight Anthem took the stage Friday night. Just as the second verse began, the band crashed in with a single chord that rang out as the crowd erupted in excitement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2011
Washington's 9:30 Club, run by Bethesda-based I.M.P., and U Street Music Hall have formed a cross-venue booking alliance, the two Washington clubs said today. They say the partnership will allow them to foster up-and-coming talent. "There will be bands that we present at U Street Music Hall that will one day headline at Merriweather," said I.M.P. chairman Seth Hurwitz, who also runs the Columbia amphitheater, in a statement. It also enables the two clubs to be competitive against Live Nation, which opened the Fillmore in Silver Spring in September in a bid to grow its slice of the midsize club market.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2010
One of the city's cultural landmarks is about to get a new name thanks to a $3.5 million gift from the former owner of the Baltimore Ravens. The Lyric — also known as the Lyric Opera House and, when it opened in 1894, the Music Hall — will become the Patricia & Arthur Modell Performing Arts Center at the Lyric after an official ceremony on Sept. 21. The change acknowledges the donation from Modell and his wife. The gift, one of the largest made to a Baltimore cultural institution, completes a $12.5 million capital campaign by the Lyric Foundation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 28, 2010
L aurie DeYoung doesn't hesitate when asked for a defining moment from her 24-plus years as the morning voice of WPOC-FM. The moment was not heard on air, has nothing to do with the country music the station plays and happened well out of the public eye. But it goes a long way toward explaining why she has remained a dominant force on Baltimore's airwaves for more than two decades, and why she was honored in Nashville on Tuesday with her induction to...
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | August 21, 2008
For nearly all of the 15 years of the Chesapeake Music Hall, Annapolis native David Bosley-Reynolds was a bedrock of its productions, starring in everything from Little Shop of Horrors to Oklahoma! Since that venue near the Bay Bridge closed in 2004, Bosley-Reynolds has been flourishing at Toby's Dinner Theatre in Baltimore and Columbia. BroadwayWorld.com voted Bosley-Reynolds the 2007 Actor of the Year, in recognition of his performances in five musicals in 12 months: The Full Monty, Little Shop of Horrors, Titanic the Musical, Fiddler on the Roof and The Sound of Music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Choi | January 24, 2008
George Strait's successful country music career has spanned more than three decades. The native Texan, who in 2006 was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame, has more than 50 No. 1 hit singles and has won dozens of awards, including honors from the Country Music Association and the American Music Awards. Strait, a current Grammy nominee, performs Saturday at 1st Mariner Arena. Country music group Little Big Town will also perform. The show starts at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $54.50-$64.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and By Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 11, 2000
"Annie," the 1977 musical that brought new life to the comic-strip orphan, was off to a resounding start at its opening Friday with a lively overture featuring Chesapeake Music Hall music director-pianist Anita O'Connor accompanied by trumpets, trombones, violins, tuba and drums. A team effort of Broadway's Thomas Meaghan, lyricist-director Martin Charnin and composer Charles Strouse, the show might well be O'Connor's best work at the Music Hall to date. A New York City orphanage early in Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration is the setting for "Annie," the tale of a spunky optimist who shares "a hard-knock life" with her fellow orphans.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to The Sun | December 16, 2007
It's the tap, tappiest time of the year. Maybe you're soon headed up to New York City's Radio City Music Hall for the Christmas Spectacular? The show is terrific, trust me. I've seen it dozens and dozens of times. But not this year. Doctor's orders, you see. I'm in Rockette Rehab. Like most love affairs gone bad, mine with "America's dancing daughters" began innocently enough. In 1994, I was a hot-shot publicist, recently axed from my senior vice president's position at a global public relations firm.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 11, 2006
New York - Sixties' doo-wop, Roaring '20s syncopation, '80s disco and Great Depression blues. Song titles like "Big Girls Don't Cry" "Fancy Dress," "Saturday Night in the City" and "What About Love?" These musical styles and songs belong to the four shows competing for best new musical at tonight's Tony Awards ceremony (8-11 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13). The shows might not appear to have much in common: They take place in separate eras; they look and sound dissimilar; they have disparate plots; and their characters have different goals.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.