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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 10, 2000
Encounters with Shakespeare are supposed to be uplifting occurrences, and that's exactly how things worked out for the Ensemble Galilei. The early music consort, so popular in Annapolis because of its annual concert series at St. John's College, recently began combing libraries and anthologies of 16th-century British music in search of songs and instrumental pieces that might have been heard during early performances of Shakespeare's plays. The result of the group's efforts, a 65-minute compact disc titled "Come, Gentle Night: Music of Shakespeare's World," has just been released by Telarc International, the largest American-owned independent classical recording company.
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NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | November 7, 2013
If you are not familiar with the Meccorre String Quartet, you are not alone. This Polish classical music group is coming to Columbia as part of its first tour of North America. It performs for the Candlelight Concert Society on Saturday, Nov. 9, at 8 p.m. in Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. Formed in 2007, the group already has done extensive European touring and hence seems primed to bring a satisfying program to audiences on this side of the Atlantic Ocean. The upcoming program promises to be well-balanced in terms of the quartet repertory.
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NEWS
June 23, 1998
In a story in Sunday's Arts & Society section about Louie's Bookstore Cafe, the name of a music group was misstated. The correct name is Helicon.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 6/23/98
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 15, 2010
The Rev. William Smith Jr., a well-known Baltimore church organist who established the Christian record label Ice Music Group and founded two choirs and a church, died March 1 of cancer at Seasons Hospice at Northwest Hospital Center. The Windsor Mill resident was 53. Mr. Smith was born in Baltimore and raised in the city's Park Heights neighborhood. He was a 1974 City College graduate and attended Towson University and the Peabody Conservatory. He was a graduate of the Living Word Bible College.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 21, 2005
The word "hip-hop" may be in the title, but this gathering has nothing to do with rap lyrics and hard-hitting beats. The theme of the Maryland Hip-Hop Summit - a one-day conference at the Murphy Fine Arts Center on the campus of Morgan State University today - centers on financial literacy and creating wealth: Get Your Money Right. The event, which is free to the public, is spearheaded by Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele and Hip-Hop Summit Action Network chairman and entertainment mogul Russell Simmons.
FEATURES
By Jeff Leeds and Jeff Leeds,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 5, 2004
In an unusual pact with New York authorities, the world's largest record corporations have agreed to step up their efforts to track down a slew of recording artists who are owed back royalties of about $50 million. As part of a deal announced yesterday by New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, the five conglomerates - Universal Music Group, Sony Music Entertainment, EMI Group, Bertelsmann Music Group and Warner Music Group - are expected to share their latest artist contact information with one another.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 7, 2003
TOKYO - Two of the world's entertainment giants, Sony Corp. of Japan and Bertelsmann AG of Germany, have made tentative plans to merge their music businesses into a joint venture to bolster their flagging operations. The companies signed a nonbinding letter of intent, an executive familiar with the deal said yesterday, indicating that the merger is not final. The two companies have been negotiating for several weeks, others said. Record companies worldwide are trying to find ways to offset the explosion in music available legally and illegally on the Internet.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 25, 2003
NEW YORK - Vivendi Universal SA, trying to cut $16 billion of debt, received five offers for its U.S. entertainment assets and may narrow the field of potential buyers starting next week, people familiar with the situation said yesterday. Billionaire Marvin Davis, Edgar Bronfman Jr. and John Malone's Liberty Media Corp. all bid for the Paris-based company's Vivendi Music Group and Vivendi Universal Entertainment, said the people, who asked not to be named. The assets include the Universal film and television studios, the USA and Sci-Fi cable networks and amusement parks.
FEATURES
By Barry Layne and Barry Layne,Hollywood Reporter | January 16, 1994
Warner Music Group and Sony Music Entertainment, the world's two largest music companies, are in advanced stages of negotiations to create a global music-based entertainment and retailing television service.The channel is expected to be offered on a global basis, sources said, with U.S. distribution packaged as a basic cable service.The content is expected to feature artists and groups from both companies' extensive collection of performers -- from both owned and distributed record companies -- as well as retailing components that include prerecorded music, merchandise andvideos.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | March 15, 1994
NEW YORK -- Tele-Communications Inc. Chief Executive John C. Malone has held discussions with Time Warner Inc. executives about joining an international cable music program to compete with Viacom Inc.'s MTV channel, executives close to the discussions said yesterday.The discussions could threaten an agreement in principle that TCI reached in September with Germany's Bertelsmann A. G. to launch their own channel competitive with MTV.Time Warner's Warner Music Group, Sony Corp.'s Sony Music, Thorn EMI PLC's EMI Music unit and PolyGram, majority-owned by Philips Electronics, revealed in January that they were setting up their own international music channel.
BUSINESS
By Joseph Menn and Alana Semuels and Joseph Menn and Alana Semuels,Los Angeles Times | May 17, 2007
Amazon is finally taking on Apple. The Seattle-based online retail powerhouse said yesterday that it would open a digital music store with a consumer-friendly twist that, Amazon hopes, will give Apple's iTunes a run for its money. The difference: Customers can do anything they want with the songs they buy. Dealing a blow to a pillar of the recording industry's anti-piracy efforts, Amazon.com Inc. said none of the millions of tracks it planned to sell would be encumbered by software that restricts copying.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | December 16, 2006
Hillen Jenkins Smith Sr., a retired insurance executive who opened his home for 24 years to raise money for charities and musical groups, died of heart disease Wednesday at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. The former Roland Park resident was 88. Born and raised in Baltimore County's Long Green, he was a 1936 Boys' Latin School graduate who attended the Johns Hopkins University for two years. As a young man, he trained thoroughbred horses and became an advertising copywriter for the old Hecht's Reliable Stores.
BUSINESS
By Charles Duhigg and Dawn C. Chmielewski and Charles Duhigg and Dawn C. Chmielewski,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 30, 2006
Music fans for the first time will be able to download free, legal copies of songs from a major record label under a deal announced yesterday by Universal Music Group. The experiment in advertising-supported music marks a significant shift for an industry that has spent years fighting to stop global online piracy and was viewed as slow to embrace the potential of the Internet. Universal's agreement with SpiralFrog will grant free, unlimited access to the hundreds of thousands of songs in the label's catalog, including such acts as Kanye West and U2. SpiralFrog's users will be required to watch a 90-second advertisement while each song downloads.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 21, 2005
The word "hip-hop" may be in the title, but this gathering has nothing to do with rap lyrics and hard-hitting beats. The theme of the Maryland Hip-Hop Summit - a one-day conference at the Murphy Fine Arts Center on the campus of Morgan State University today - centers on financial literacy and creating wealth: Get Your Money Right. The event, which is free to the public, is spearheaded by Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele and Hip-Hop Summit Action Network chairman and entertainment mogul Russell Simmons.
FEATURES
By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 15, 2005
LOS ANGELES - You flip the radio dial and hear a blurry wash of rock guitars. Ah, it's one of the season's signature rock songs, "Boulevard of Broken Dreams" by Green Day. No, wait - isn't that Liam Gallagher's wavering, nasal voice? The song must be the Brit-pop classic "Wonderwall" by Oasis. Hold on - now it sounds like Travis and, uh, can that really be Aerosmith? Don't adjust your radio or bother trying to sing along. You're caught in a mash-up. We live in a culture of reruns, recycling and "re-imaginings," and the example of the moment is the song described above, one of several "mash-ups" that are being played on progressive radio stations in Los Angeles.
FEATURES
By Jeff Leeds and Jeff Leeds,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 5, 2004
In an unusual pact with New York authorities, the world's largest record corporations have agreed to step up their efforts to track down a slew of recording artists who are owed back royalties of about $50 million. As part of a deal announced yesterday by New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, the five conglomerates - Universal Music Group, Sony Music Entertainment, EMI Group, Bertelsmann Music Group and Warner Music Group - are expected to share their latest artist contact information with one another.
BUSINESS
By Charles Duhigg and Dawn C. Chmielewski and Charles Duhigg and Dawn C. Chmielewski,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 30, 2006
Music fans for the first time will be able to download free, legal copies of songs from a major record label under a deal announced yesterday by Universal Music Group. The experiment in advertising-supported music marks a significant shift for an industry that has spent years fighting to stop global online piracy and was viewed as slow to embrace the potential of the Internet. Universal's agreement with SpiralFrog will grant free, unlimited access to the hundreds of thousands of songs in the label's catalog, including such acts as Kanye West and U2. SpiralFrog's users will be required to watch a 90-second advertisement while each song downloads.
BUSINESS
By Joseph Menn and Alana Semuels and Joseph Menn and Alana Semuels,Los Angeles Times | May 17, 2007
Amazon is finally taking on Apple. The Seattle-based online retail powerhouse said yesterday that it would open a digital music store with a consumer-friendly twist that, Amazon hopes, will give Apple's iTunes a run for its money. The difference: Customers can do anything they want with the songs they buy. Dealing a blow to a pillar of the recording industry's anti-piracy efforts, Amazon.com Inc. said none of the millions of tracks it planned to sell would be encumbered by software that restricts copying.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 7, 2003
TOKYO - Two of the world's entertainment giants, Sony Corp. of Japan and Bertelsmann AG of Germany, have made tentative plans to merge their music businesses into a joint venture to bolster their flagging operations. The companies signed a nonbinding letter of intent, an executive familiar with the deal said yesterday, indicating that the merger is not final. The two companies have been negotiating for several weeks, others said. Record companies worldwide are trying to find ways to offset the explosion in music available legally and illegally on the Internet.
NEWS
By Marc Peters and Marc Peters,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2003
Tales & Scales, a musical theater group based in Indiana, is coming to Columbia. The group, performing Sunday at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre, is one of six featured in the Candlelight Concert's Performing Arts Series for Children this season. From its beginning in 1986, Tales & Scales has used minimal sets and costumes; its musicians act out each play as they perform on their instruments. The group, whose members range in age from 24 to 35, will present its version of The Arabian Nights.
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