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By Joan Spicknalldirector@suzukimusicschool.com | June 30, 2011
Can music education programs survive and prosper in today's economic climate? The answer is yes, if … There are many variables contributing to that conclusion, and when a certain number of them combine, a positive outcome is sure to result. To begin with, let's establish the premise that "every student in the nation should have an education in the arts. " This quote is the opening statement from "The Value and Quality of Arts Education: A Statement of Principles," which was collectively written and endorsed by the nation's 10 most important educational organizations, including the American Association of School Administrators, the National Education Association, the National Parent Teachers Association and the National School Boards Association.
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Special to The Aegis | December 9, 2013
Jessica McAllister has joined Brightview Bel Air, a Brightview Senior Living community in Bel Air, as vibrant living director. "We are delighted to have Jessica join our team," Executive Director Jen Bourgeois said in a news release. "Our caring and highly trained associates drive the success of our communities and, together with residents, bring our mission - Live Vibrant - to life each day. " As vibrant living director, McAllister leads the team that provides vibrant programming in the community's assisted living and award winning Wellspring Village neighborhood for memory and Alzheimer's Care.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2011
For generations, music students have been getting gold stars, certificates and other pats on the back from their teachers. But a budding musician with high marks in one state is not necessarily on the same level, judged by the same criteria, as a budding musician in another. Such positive reinforcement may soon carry a lot more weight countrywide. Launched by Carnegie Hall in New York and the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto, the Achievement Program seeks to establish the first national standard in the United States for measuring musical aptitude in students of all ages.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2013
Delphine S. Kelly, a music teacher and former Eastern Shore social worker, died Oct. 27 of a stroke at the Chester River Hospital Center in Chestertown. She was 90. The former Delphine Stewart was born and raised in Toronto. She was the daughter of Reginald Stewart, a concert pianist, and Ruby Stewart, a homemaker. Mrs. Kelly moved with her family to Baltimore in 1941, when her father was appointed director of the Peabody Conservatory of Music and named conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, where he played an instrumental role in its reorganization in 1942 from a branch of city government to a private institution.
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By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 30, 2006
When the county school system was hit with a $5 million budget cut in 1999, the school board compiled a list of "nonessential" programs that could be considered for elimination. The elementary school music program was on the list, and although it was not considered to be in serious jeopardy of being cut, concerned parents filled the auditorium where the school board met to discuss the budget. Teachers, parents and residents packed the hearing, recalled Robert Powers, a band instructor at Emmorton Elementary School who attended the meeting.
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By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1998
Every week for the past 12 years, Worthington Elementary School music teacher Saundra Cunningham has moved cafeteria tables and rearranged chairs so that Howard County's best student singers could explore places such as South Africa, Israel, Ireland and the Deep South through music.While the youths come away feeling they have a better understanding of music, Cunningham says the Howard County Children's Chorus -- one of only two advanced choruses in the state -- is as much about enhancing their academic performance as it is about singing.
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By Liz Lean and Liz Lean,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 21, 1996
WHEN MARYLAND'S music teachers get together, they expect to be entertained by the best. Vocalists and instrumentalists from Wilde Lake High School at River Hill will travel to Ocean City next week to rehearse and perform at the annual state music education convention.Katie Harkness and Dylan Gentile will perform with the Senior All-State Chorus. This is Katie's second year making the highly competitive group and Dylan's third.Three Wilde Lake freshmen will debut with the Junior All-State Chorus.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 20, 1999
Absolute power corrupts absolutely.But there are exceptions to that rule -- people so good that they're incapable of being corrupted, such as the violinist Midori.She's got the power to charge one of the highest fees in classical music and draw sellout crowds no matter how high the ticket prices. That's why the Peabody Conservatory wanted to engage her for the benefit recital that the violinist and her longtime collaborator and Peabody professor of piano, Robert McDonald, give tonight in Friedberg Hall.
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April 20, 2012
Barbara Girdler Music Scholarship - A scholarship in the amount of $1,000 will be awarded to a qualified Howard County High School band student graduating in Spring 2012 who plans to pursue a music education degree from a four-year college or university. Eligibility requirements and applications are available in high school guidance offices and online at http://www.girdlermusic.org . The application deadline is Fri., April 27.
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By COX NEWS SERVICE | November 13, 2007
The sad irony is that the No Child Left Behind Act is intended to better prepare our children for the real world, yet it's leaving music behind despite its proven benefits."
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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2013
Allyson Luo took up clarinet because the instrument was shiny and "looked nice. " David Flyr began playing the French horn because his mother said it might be a path to scholarships. At some point, both River Hill High School seniors discovered they were on to something; through those instruments, their talents shined. Now both have been recognized among some of the best school musicians in the state and nation. Luo and Flyr were among 670 students nationwide to be named to the National Association for Music Education's All-National Honor Ensemble, which will perform at the organization's conference in Nashville, Tenn., on Oct. 30. Luo and Flyr were among four Howard County band members selected for the ensemble.
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By Kit Waskom Pollard | October 3, 2013
As a young violinist and student of music education, Bel Air resident Wendy Bohdel became intrigued by the Suzuki method of teaching music, which relies on repetition, experience and listening. But soon Bohdel realized that the Japanese technique was more than just an approach to music: It was a teaching framework for life. First as an orchestra director with Harford County Public Schools and later, as chief officer for Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Greater Chesapeake, and in her current role as chief operating officer at the wellness-focused Institute for Integrative Health in Baltimore, Bohdel has drawn on the Suzuki method to develop and implement programs.
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By Blair Ames, bames@tribune.com | September 30, 2013
Winters Mill High School junior Scott Taylor practices on the French horn for at least an hour a day. That dedication has paid off for Taylor, who recently was named a member of the 2013 All-National Honor Band. "Just the opportunity to play with the best musicians in the nation, that really excites me," Taylor said. Taylor, 16, will travel to Nashville in late October as part of the 2013 All-National Honor Band sponsored by the National Association for Music Education (NafME)
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June 3, 2013
MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY: The following area residents were among the 1,110 students who graduated from Millersville University of Pennsylvania during the spring 2013 undergraduate commencement ceremony on Saturday, May 18 in Millersville's Biemesderfer Stadium at Chryst Field: Allison Casola, of Bel Air, graduated with a bachelor of science in biology; Sarah Wehland, of Bel Air, graduated with a BSE degree in early childhood education; Rachel Ryan,...
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By Cathy Carter | January 24, 2013
When jazz musician Yosvany Terry talks about music education, his voice rises with emotion. "We need to focus on the younger generation," he said by phone from his home in New York City. "They are the ones who will carry the torch into the future. We must expose them to different musical traditions so they can learn how to utilize what's come before them. Then they will be able to fly higher with their own creations. " Considering his passionate stance, it's fitting the Cuban born saxophonist is the headliner Saturday, Jan. 26 for the 9th Annual Jazz @ The Lake concert.
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By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
Even after breaking up, the Bridge can't let fall pass by without taking a Baltimore stage. The roots-rock six-piece, which broke up last November after its annual Thanksgiving Eve headlining show at Rams Head Live, will reunite for one night only on Saturday at the Maryland Science Center (601 Light St.). Tickets, available here ($30 for 18+, $40 for 21+), are on sale now. Proceeds from the reunion show will go toward Believe in Music, a non-profit organization aiming to "uplift underprivileged Baltimore City students academically, culturally and spiritually" through music education, according to a press release.
NEWS
January 18, 2007
Victoria Hazel Perkins, who taught music in Baltimore County public schools for 31 years, died of colon cancer Friday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Lutherville resident was 58. Born in Baltimore and raised in the Hamilton section, she was a 1966 graduate of Eastern High School and earned her bachelor's degree in cello and music education from the Peabody Conservatory in 1970. She later earned a master's degree in music education from what is now Towson University. Miss Perkins taught instrumental music and spent most of her career at what is now Catonsville Middle School until retiring in 2000 because of failing health.
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September 27, 1994
Gloria Sturgis StokesMusician, teacherGloria Sturgis Stokes, a retired teacher and music department head in the Baltimore public school system, died Friday at Bon Secours Hospital of complications from diabetes. She was 71.Mrs. Stokes, who played piano, violin and other instruments, started as a music education teacher in 1949 and retired in 1982 as head of the music department at the old Clifton Park Junior High School, where she had taught for about 10 years.The former Gloria Sturgis was born in West Point, Va., and reared in Baltimore, where she graduated from Dunbar High School.
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October 13, 2012
Brian Drake, an instrumental music teacher and band director at Westminster High School, has been selected as the inaugural recipient of the Carroll County Music Educator Award, sponsored by the Music Advocates of Carroll County. The award was scheduled to be presented during the Westminster High School Marching Band Show on Saturday, Oct. 13. Drake has been an instrumental music director at Westminster High School for more than 10 years. During this tenure, the school has been recognized for exceptional ensembles, both outside on the marching field and inside on the concert stage.
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By Sue Van Essen | October 8, 2012
There's a new face at Arnolia United Methodist Church - but a familiar face to the area. Keith Derrickson recently became the church's director of music, and brought with him years of experience and creativity. A Baltimore County Public Schools music teacher from 1978 until 2008 - at Overlea, Hereford and Parkville high schools, as well as Pleasant Plains Elementary - he most recently served as an interim professor at Towson University teaching music education classes and serving as a student intern supervisor.
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