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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | August 31, 1993
One of the downsides of celebrity is that it makes people look at you funny. Instead of being known for what you did and how you did it, suddenly you become seen in terms of your looks, your quirks and your social contacts. And while that doesn't necessarily diminish the public's appreciation of your real work, it can make it hard for them to remember what brought you fame in the first place.Take Mariah Carey. When her self-titled debut popped up in 1990, all most listeners knew about her was her name and the sound of her voice.
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By Tim Smith, Baltimore Sun Media Group | March 28, 2013
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is launching a Music Box Series, designed for the 6-month- to 3-year-old set. BSO vice president of education Carol Bogash calls the project “the final piece in the BSO's educational framework” and cites a McMaster University study indicating that “early musical training benefits children even before they can walk or talk.” The series will feature actress, dancer, storyteller and Baltimore School for...
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NEWS
February 27, 2003
Betty Jane Hayden, 48, music box, record collector Betty Jane Hayden, who enjoyed dancing and collecting music boxes, died of congestive heart failure Saturday at the home of her caregiver in Cumberland. She was 48. Miss Hayden was born in Baltimore with Down syndrome, and lived most of her life with her parents in Dundalk. Her mother died in 1991, and after her father's death in 1997, she remained in Dundalk with a caregiver. They moved to Cumberland last year. "My sister was born with Down syndrome, and at birth, doctors recommended to my parents that she be institutionalized because she had a severe degree of retardation," said her brother, former Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden of Baldwin.
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By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,sun reporter | July 8, 2007
Alex Linowitz, a former owner of Lafayette Radio Electronics on North Charles Street and an expert at repairing music boxes, died Friday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville. He was 89. Born in New York City and raised in Brooklyn, Mr. Linowitz attended City College of New York. He did not complete his final semester because of financial hardships his family faced during the Depression. "He had to quit school and go to work," said a daughter, Judy Doyle of Reisterstown.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,sun reporter | July 8, 2007
Alex Linowitz, a former owner of Lafayette Radio Electronics on North Charles Street and an expert at repairing music boxes, died Friday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville. He was 89. Born in New York City and raised in Brooklyn, Mr. Linowitz attended City College of New York. He did not complete his final semester because of financial hardships his family faced during the Depression. "He had to quit school and go to work," said a daughter, Judy Doyle of Reisterstown.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt | October 1, 1995
A roundup of new products and servicesGood nooseTie one on with some multi-colored neck ware featuring the best of Baltimore, including the blue crab, Oriole Park at Camden Yards, the Shot Tower and the city's signature endearment, "Hon." The pictured silk tie sells for $30. A bow-tie and cummerbund set sells for $45. These accessories are available at the gift shops at the Peale Museum and Carroll Mansion. Or call (410) 396-3523 to place a mail order. Tax, shipping and handling are extra.
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By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | November 13, 1991
Despite major script revisions made by playwright Israel Horovitz in his play, "Park Your Car in Harvard Yard," during the show's four-week tryout in Baltimore, the New York critics have given his new work a lukewarm reception at best.The play, set in the fishing town of Gloucester, Mass., debuted last Thursday at the Music Box Theater on Broadway. Although a few critics praised the script, the general consensus seems to be that "Park Your Car . . ." is too long, too redundant, too predictable, too contrived and too routine.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 18, 2000
With its circular central platform surrounded by white pillars, the set for Olney Theatre Center's production of "Tartuffe" looks like a cross between a wedding cake and a giant music box. And, indeed, director Halo Wines' solid staging of Moliere's 17th-century comedy is a pleasantly harmonious confection. In the play, Orgon, a gullible Paris aristocrat, falls under the sway of a flim-flam holy man named Tartuffe. If Orgon's home is depicted as an elegant music box -- complete with tinkly music and dance interludes between scenes -- the pseudo-pious Tartuffe sounds the sole discordant note.
BUSINESS
By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 6, 1998
A tune plays softly when you open the door to Rosalie and Joe Manfre's home. The music is a sweet lullaby. It's as if the house is welcoming you inside with its song.Upon closer inspection, you notice a small, round, brass-colored music box sitting just above the doorway. When the door swings open, it pulls a string to start the music.The hidden music box is just one of the many things that the Manfres love about their 70-some-year-old Colonial in Overlea.That's not surprising, considering that music has always been important to the Manfres.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | October 23, 1992
A good farce is like an intricate music box -- the type with lots of movable parts. And, Ken Ludwig's "Lend Me a Tenor" is more like a music box than most since it's about opera. To stretch this metaphor a bit further, at the Spotlighters the music box takes on the added detail of being see-through. That's because the theater's arena staging makes all of the workings visible at all times.Tricky as this may be -- and in this case both the performances and Miriam Bazensky's direction are uneven -- there's also something delightfully fitting about mounting a farce in the round.
NEWS
By EILEEN SOSKIN and EILEEN SOSKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2006
We usually hear concerts of music by very famous composers, individuals who are universally recognized as musical geniuses. At 8 p.m. tomorrow in Smith Theatre at Howard Community College, Candlelight Concerts will present the Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet in a performance of four pieces, three of which are by composers probably unknown to you. The list of musical titans includes Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and Brahms, although the list...
FEATURES
By Story by Ellen Gamerman | February 19, 2004
Brahms' "Lullaby" fills the living room. Ben Oliver has turned on the music box and tinny notes play in a loop, circling around like the miniature ballroom figures twirling inside it. Ben takes his wife's hands, lifts her off the couch. "You ready?" he asks. "Here we go." One step, then two, then three. A soft waltz on the carpet. Ben can see Florence is tired. Earlier tonight, he tried to boost his wife's spirits, but when he talked about all the things they have to look forward to - starting with this evening's dance in the Crystal Ballroom at Leisure World - she just went fuzzy.
NEWS
February 27, 2003
Betty Jane Hayden, 48, music box, record collector Betty Jane Hayden, who enjoyed dancing and collecting music boxes, died of congestive heart failure Saturday at the home of her caregiver in Cumberland. She was 48. Miss Hayden was born in Baltimore with Down syndrome, and lived most of her life with her parents in Dundalk. Her mother died in 1991, and after her father's death in 1997, she remained in Dundalk with a caregiver. They moved to Cumberland last year. "My sister was born with Down syndrome, and at birth, doctors recommended to my parents that she be institutionalized because she had a severe degree of retardation," said her brother, former Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden of Baldwin.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 18, 2000
With its circular central platform surrounded by white pillars, the set for Olney Theatre Center's production of "Tartuffe" looks like a cross between a wedding cake and a giant music box. And, indeed, director Halo Wines' solid staging of Moliere's 17th-century comedy is a pleasantly harmonious confection. In the play, Orgon, a gullible Paris aristocrat, falls under the sway of a flim-flam holy man named Tartuffe. If Orgon's home is depicted as an elegant music box -- complete with tinkly music and dance interludes between scenes -- the pseudo-pious Tartuffe sounds the sole discordant note.
BUSINESS
By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 6, 1998
A tune plays softly when you open the door to Rosalie and Joe Manfre's home. The music is a sweet lullaby. It's as if the house is welcoming you inside with its song.Upon closer inspection, you notice a small, round, brass-colored music box sitting just above the doorway. When the door swings open, it pulls a string to start the music.The hidden music box is just one of the many things that the Manfres love about their 70-some-year-old Colonial in Overlea.That's not surprising, considering that music has always been important to the Manfres.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 3, 1998
At Christmas, everybody likes getting something special in a fancy box. It might be an expensive Swiss watch; maybe an exquisite piece of jewelry; perhaps an extravagant silk necktie or scarf.Or it could be a bunch of CDs.For their part, the record companies are hoping that this season's gift-buyers will bypass Rolex and Hermes and opt for that fourth choice. To that end, this year's boxed-set offerings have put a premium on packaging, appealing as much to the eye -- and to the collector's instinct -- as to the ear.It hardly matters what's in the box. Whether you go for sounds as safely mainstream as Queen's pomp rock, or as adventurously avant-garde as John Coltrane's jazz, there's a gorgeous boxed set waiting for you.But before you buy, maybe you ought to consider whether the music inside is as dazzling as the artwork outside.
FEATURES
By The Hartford Courant | October 27, 1992
Earlier this year, as the Broadway revival of "A Streetcar Named Desire" was nearing the end of its run, Jessica Lange told a theater magazine writer she was going to quit acting when the show closed.But it looked as if the 43-year-old actress was still in the middle of the acting business when she met the press recently to promote her co-starring film role with Robert De Niro in "Night and the City."So was she misquoted? Was she having a bad day? Was she serious?"I knew this was going to haunt me," she sighs, smiling.
NEWS
By EILEEN SOSKIN and EILEEN SOSKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2006
We usually hear concerts of music by very famous composers, individuals who are universally recognized as musical geniuses. At 8 p.m. tomorrow in Smith Theatre at Howard Community College, Candlelight Concerts will present the Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet in a performance of four pieces, three of which are by composers probably unknown to you. The list of musical titans includes Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and Brahms, although the list...
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 28, 1998
This summer, the hottest trend in music is movies.Since June, the best-selling albums in America more often than not have been soundtracks. Over the last eight weeks, "City of Angels" has spent three weeks at No. 1 on the Billboard albums chart, while "Armageddon -- The Album" spent two. Furthermore, the few albums that have bumped them aside quickly fell out of the Top 10, while the soundtracks remain fixtures in the Top Five.Nor are they the only soundtrack albums selling well at the moment.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 30, 1997
Originally, boxed sets were conceived as a way to sum up a career that was too big for a single "Greatest Hits" collection.That's still the case to some degree, but there's also a strong historical element to the current generation of boxed sets. AC/DC's "Bonfire," for instance, pays tribute to the band's original singer, Bon Scott; while "The Philly Sound" documents the heyday of producers Kenneth Gamble and Leon Huff. There are even sets, such as the Beach Boys' "Pet Sounds Sessions," that take an educational aim, offering an inside view of the making of a landmark album.
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