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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Marianna T. Earp, a retired music appreciation teacher, died of dementia Sunday at Maryland Masonic Home in Cockeysville. The Towson resident was 82. Born Marianna T. Markowski in the Baltic section of Poland, she was the daughter of Walter and Michelina Markowski. During World War II, she, her parents and siblings were sent to forced labor camps, including one near Stuttgart, by the Nazi German occupiers, family members said. After the war, Mrs. Earp was placed in a displaced persons camp.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Marianna T. Earp, a retired music appreciation teacher, died of dementia Sunday at Maryland Masonic Home in Cockeysville. The Towson resident was 82. Born Marianna T. Markowski in the Baltic section of Poland, she was the daughter of Walter and Michelina Markowski. During World War II, she, her parents and siblings were sent to forced labor camps, including one near Stuttgart, by the Nazi German occupiers, family members said. After the war, Mrs. Earp was placed in a displaced persons camp.
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NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2005
Orioles baseball competed with the horn-heavy sounds of Afro-Cuban salsa yesterday as fans of both mingled at the corner of Bank Street and Broadway, the heart of Baltimore's Latino community. The event was a city-sponsored fusion of baseball and music appreciation, designed to draw a connection between the Orioles' Latino-heavy roster and Baltimore's burgeoning Latino community. The city's Believemobile featured a free concert by Ricardo Lemvo and Makina Loca, an international group whose sound is a blend of Congolese soukous music and Cuban salsa.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,special to the sun | March 9, 2007
George M. Cohan (1878-1942) was the son of an Irish-American vaudeville couple. He began performing as a child and grew up to be a phenomenally talented performer, playwright, song writer, director and producer. Cohan's career is celebrated in George M, a 1968 Broadway musical by Michael Stewart and John and Francine Pascal. The show, a feast of old-time song and dance, is running at Toby's Dinner Theatre through June 10 in a brisk production directed by Toby Orenstein. Cohan wrote more than 500 songs, but his reputation today rests on a handful of great numbers that appeared between 1904 and 1906 -- "Give My Regards to Broadway," "The Yankee Doodle Boy," "Mary's a Grand Old Name," "Harrigan," "You're a Grand Old Flag" and "Over There" (1917)
NEWS
By David Grimes | April 11, 2000
IF YOU LIKE to listen to loud music in your car, you may want to avoid the town of Alexandria, La. Unless you like country music. I mean, really like it. According to an Associated Press story, Henry Nelson, 20, and Jon Driggers, 26, pleaded guilty to violating Rapides Parish's ordinance prohibiting "loud and offensive noise" after cranking up the volume too high on their car stereo. They were fined, given a suspended jail sentence and probation, and ordered to attend a "music appreciation" session where they would spend three hours listening to their least-favorite kind of music -- country.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1999
In August, Ann Ivester, chairwoman of the board of the Howard Community College Educational Foundation, decided she'd like to take an art or music appreciation course at the college. A recent retiree, she was eager to learn about things she didn't have time for as a businesswoman.She tried to get into one art class that combined lessons with museum visits, but all three sections were full. Then she tried to sign up for a music appreciation class, but those sections were full, too. That's when she realized the college is facing a serious problem: It's crowded, and getting more so, and unless something is done soon, the college will keep having to turn away potential students.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1999
In August, Ann Ivester, chairwoman of the board of the Howard Community College Educational Foundation, decided she'd like to take an art or music appreciation course at the college. A recent retiree, she was eager to learn about things she didn't have time for as a businesswoman.She tried to get into one art class that combined lessons with museum visits, but all three sections were full. Then she tried to sign up for a music appreciation class, but those sections were full, too. That's when she realized the college is facing a serious problem: It's crowded, and getting more so, and unless something is done soon, the college will keep having to turn away potential students.
NEWS
July 7, 1995
Who would dare desecrate Old Glory?One of my proudest moments of World War II was when I raised a flag that my father had sent to me in the center of a town we occupied in Germany after V-E Day.The flag was beautiful and represented the nation we honored and countless Americans who fought and died since its founding.It is not a political symbol to be displayed indiscriminately, but it does represent America to me. With all its faults, this is still the best country in the world.We pledged allegiance to this symbol, and no one has the right to desecrate or destroy the flag, which I proudly display on every occasion.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,special to the sun | March 9, 2007
George M. Cohan (1878-1942) was the son of an Irish-American vaudeville couple. He began performing as a child and grew up to be a phenomenally talented performer, playwright, song writer, director and producer. Cohan's career is celebrated in George M, a 1968 Broadway musical by Michael Stewart and John and Francine Pascal. The show, a feast of old-time song and dance, is running at Toby's Dinner Theatre through June 10 in a brisk production directed by Toby Orenstein. Cohan wrote more than 500 songs, but his reputation today rests on a handful of great numbers that appeared between 1904 and 1906 -- "Give My Regards to Broadway," "The Yankee Doodle Boy," "Mary's a Grand Old Name," "Harrigan," "You're a Grand Old Flag" and "Over There" (1917)
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1996
Howard Community College students who don't want to sit in classrooms and listen to lectures have a new option this fall -- taking their courses on the Internet.Howard joins a growing number of colleges and universities across the country -- including the University of Maryland University College -- that offer courses online in an effort to make themselves more available to students.At the west Columbia campus, where more than 5,100 part- and full-time students are expected when the fall semester begins Tuesday, eight classes will be offered almost entirely online, including composition, creative writing, music appreciation and economics.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2005
Orioles baseball competed with the horn-heavy sounds of Afro-Cuban salsa yesterday as fans of both mingled at the corner of Bank Street and Broadway, the heart of Baltimore's Latino community. The event was a city-sponsored fusion of baseball and music appreciation, designed to draw a connection between the Orioles' Latino-heavy roster and Baltimore's burgeoning Latino community. The city's Believemobile featured a free concert by Ricardo Lemvo and Makina Loca, an international group whose sound is a blend of Congolese soukous music and Cuban salsa.
FEATURES
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2002
SALISBURY - If we go to war with Iraq tomorrow, and the United Nations doesn't like it, we can blame it on Toby Keith. We just have to explain to U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan that we went to Keith's concert Sunday night at the Wicomico Youth and Civic Center and got so carried away with his aggressive patriotism that we took the words to his controversial song literally and had to kick somebody's rear. If you are not a country music fan, there are a few things you need to know about Keith, whose wildly popular "Courtesy of the Red, White, and Blue (The Angry American)"
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC WRITER | May 22, 2000
The notion of a superstar flutist would have been a pipe dream in the 19th century. It was still pretty much unthinkable until about 30 years ago, when Jean-Pierre Rampal became virtually a household name. Not that Rampal, who died Saturday in Paris of heart failure at the age of 78, wasn't already firmly established in musical circles by then. After secretive music lessons during the German occupation of France, he played in orchestras, soon reaching the post of principal flutist of the Paris Opera in 1956.
NEWS
By David Grimes | April 11, 2000
IF YOU LIKE to listen to loud music in your car, you may want to avoid the town of Alexandria, La. Unless you like country music. I mean, really like it. According to an Associated Press story, Henry Nelson, 20, and Jon Driggers, 26, pleaded guilty to violating Rapides Parish's ordinance prohibiting "loud and offensive noise" after cranking up the volume too high on their car stereo. They were fined, given a suspended jail sentence and probation, and ordered to attend a "music appreciation" session where they would spend three hours listening to their least-favorite kind of music -- country.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1999
In August, Ann Ivester, chairwoman of the board of the Howard Community College Educational Foundation, decided she'd like to take an art or music appreciation course at the college. A recent retiree, she was eager to learn about things she didn't have time for as a businesswoman.She tried to get into one art class that combined lessons with museum visits, but all three sections were full. Then she tried to sign up for a music appreciation class, but those sections were full, too. That's when she realized the college is facing a serious problem: It's crowded, and getting more so, and unless something is done soon, the college will keep having to turn away potential students.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1999
In August, Ann Ivester, chairwoman of the board of the Howard Community College Educational Foundation, decided she'd like to take an art or music appreciation course at the college. A recent retiree, she was eager to learn about things she didn't have time for as a businesswoman.She tried to get into one art class that combined lessons with museum visits, but all three sections were full. Then she tried to sign up for a music appreciation class, but those sections were full, too. That's when she realized the college is facing a serious problem: It's crowded, and getting more so, and unless something is done soon, the college will keep having to turn away potential students.
FEATURES
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2002
SALISBURY - If we go to war with Iraq tomorrow, and the United Nations doesn't like it, we can blame it on Toby Keith. We just have to explain to U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan that we went to Keith's concert Sunday night at the Wicomico Youth and Civic Center and got so carried away with his aggressive patriotism that we took the words to his controversial song literally and had to kick somebody's rear. If you are not a country music fan, there are a few things you need to know about Keith, whose wildly popular "Courtesy of the Red, White, and Blue (The Angry American)"
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC WRITER | May 22, 2000
The notion of a superstar flutist would have been a pipe dream in the 19th century. It was still pretty much unthinkable until about 30 years ago, when Jean-Pierre Rampal became virtually a household name. Not that Rampal, who died Saturday in Paris of heart failure at the age of 78, wasn't already firmly established in musical circles by then. After secretive music lessons during the German occupation of France, he played in orchestras, soon reaching the post of principal flutist of the Paris Opera in 1956.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1996
Howard Community College students who don't want to sit in classrooms and listen to lectures have a new option this fall -- taking their courses on the Internet.Howard joins a growing number of colleges and universities across the country -- including the University of Maryland University College -- that offer courses online in an effort to make themselves more available to students.At the west Columbia campus, where more than 5,100 part- and full-time students are expected when the fall semester begins Tuesday, eight classes will be offered almost entirely online, including composition, creative writing, music appreciation and economics.
NEWS
July 7, 1995
Who would dare desecrate Old Glory?One of my proudest moments of World War II was when I raised a flag that my father had sent to me in the center of a town we occupied in Germany after V-E Day.The flag was beautiful and represented the nation we honored and countless Americans who fought and died since its founding.It is not a political symbol to be displayed indiscriminately, but it does represent America to me. With all its faults, this is still the best country in the world.We pledged allegiance to this symbol, and no one has the right to desecrate or destroy the flag, which I proudly display on every occasion.
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