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By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | April 20, 1997
Reggie didn't get it."Who cares about some guy who died nearly 500 years ago?" she groused in the museum lobby, one eye on the shopping mall across the street.That this particular "guy" happened to be Leonardo da Vinci, one of the most creative thinkers of all time, didn't make any difference. Nor was my 11-year-old daughter moved to learn that this massive (15,000-square-foot) Boston Museum of Science exhibit is the largest ever to explore da Vinci's brilliance as a scientist and inventor as well as an artist.
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By CANDUS THOMSON | January 21, 2007
It doesn't happen but maybe once or twice a lifetime, if you're lucky. It's the chance to meet someone so smart, so courageous, who inhales life so fully that you'd swear he or she couldn't possibly be for real. For me, that person was Dr. Henry Bradford Washburn. He wouldn't have liked what I just called him. The doctor part. Or the Bradford part. Or God forbid, Mr. Washburn. "It's just Brad," he'd say, waving his free hand while shaking yours. In ancient times, Washburn would have been prowling the New World or inventing something to see new stars or leading pirates against the establishment.
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By Naedine Joy Hazell and Naedine Joy Hazell,HARTFORD COURANT | August 4, 1996
From hands-on to online, Boston has a museum for every kind of kid and the kid in everyone.Choose from dozens of programs and exhibits, ranging from the Computer Museum's giant personal computer (it has a 20-foot-wide keyboard, and that's just for starters) to virtual volleyball at the Museum of Science and interactive theater at the Children's Museum.A long weekend or a few days midweek would be best for families intending to visit all three, but one or two museums can be visited in a day.The stroller-to-grade-school crowd would most enjoy the Children's Museum, which gears its four floors of exhibits to children 10 and under.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | November 3, 2006
Hats off to Jack Horkheimer, celebrating 30 years as host of Star Gazer, PBS program on naked-eye stargazing (www.jackstargazer.com). His show, from WPBT Channel 2 in Miami, is carried by Maryland Public Television. Jack's also planetarium director at Miami's Museum of Science, so he's as much at ease with space science as with the mythology of the night sky. He's even carved his signature sign-off onto his tombstone: "`Keep Looking Up!' was my life's admonition. I can do little else in my present position."
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | November 3, 2006
Hats off to Jack Horkheimer, celebrating 30 years as host of Star Gazer, PBS program on naked-eye stargazing (www.jackstargazer.com). His show, from WPBT Channel 2 in Miami, is carried by Maryland Public Television. Jack's also planetarium director at Miami's Museum of Science, so he's as much at ease with space science as with the mythology of the night sky. He's even carved his signature sign-off onto his tombstone: "`Keep Looking Up!' was my life's admonition. I can do little else in my present position."
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | January 14, 1992
The Maryland Science Center is one of eight science museums around the country that will share in a $1.5 million federal grant to develop traveling exhibits and outreach education programs on AIDS aimed primarily at youngsters, a museum official said yesterday.The Science Center and seven other institutions will develop exhibits and programs that will focus on "making people aware of the basic science behind the [AIDS] disease," said Raylene Decatur, the museum's senior director of programs and operations.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Gail Gibson and Eric Siegel and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2000
The Maryland Science Center is fighting an attempt to sink its upcoming blockbuster exhibit on the Titanic. The Inner Harbor museum has sued a New York-based company that has exclusive rights to recover items from the wreck of the ill-fated passenger liner, seeking to force the company to live up to what it described as an agreement to provide artifacts and other support for "Titanic Science: Depths of Discovery." The suit follows a demand last month by the company, RMS Titanic Inc., that the science center stop developing and marketing the $2.3 million exhibit, which is scheduled to open in November and run for several months, court papers say. The exhibit is expected to generate about a quarter of the museum's annual revenues.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | April 9, 1991
In a world where medical miracles have become almost commonplace, decisions are harder to make: Benefits have to be balanced against risks, choices can create problems that call for further choices, and whatever you do will have medical, ethical, economic and legal ramifications.That's the theme of "Designer Genes: Sizing Up Bioethics," the current exhibit at the Maryland Science Center. Visitors to the show can look, touch, listen and, then, with the push of a button, make the yes or no decisions they may someday have to make in a life-or-death situation.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | March 9, 1997
Calling all kids (and parents) who groan at the mere mention of a museum. Boston's for you.I can't think of a better place to convert museum-haters (including the one who lives in my house) to enthusiastic museum-goers. That's because almost every museum in Boston has designed child-friendly exhibits guaranteed to engage even the most reluctant (read: "When can we go back to the hotel and swim?") youngster. He won't have time to think about being bored because he'll be busy unraveling the Mystery of the Mummy at the Museum of Fine Arts, writing backward like Leonardo da Vinci at the Museum of Science, or trying out the experts' picks of the best children's software at the Computer Museum, the only one of its kind.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 2, 1996
I'm beginning to think the one clear signal of a rotten movie is Morgan Freeman. This distinguished gentleman has of late earned a handsome living by contributing his immense talent and dignity to the most specious of projects and, by his very gravitas, giving them a claim to serious attention they otherwise fail to generate on their own.That's certainly true of the awesomely dismal "Chain Reaction," a strictly by-the-numbers job that, sans Freeman, would...
TRAVEL
February 10, 2002
While swishing and spitting (instead of savoring and swallowing) may sound like a crime against good wine, it's the only way to go at the third annual Washington, D.C., International Wine Festival -- if you want to stay upright, that is. The event, which takes place March 2-3, draws representatives from more than 220 wineries in 12 countries -- all of whom will be pouring a combined total of more than 1,800 wines for tasting. Designated drivers aren't left out in the cold, though. Fine Cooking magazine presents a celebrity-chef stage where gourmets demonstrate their skills (and you reap the rewards in samples and take-home recipes)
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Gail Gibson and Eric Siegel and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2000
The Maryland Science Center is fighting an attempt to sink its upcoming blockbuster exhibit on the Titanic. The Inner Harbor museum has sued a New York-based company that has exclusive rights to recover items from the wreck of the ill-fated passenger liner, seeking to force the company to live up to what it described as an agreement to provide artifacts and other support for "Titanic Science: Depths of Discovery." The suit follows a demand last month by the company, RMS Titanic Inc., that the science center stop developing and marketing the $2.3 million exhibit, which is scheduled to open in November and run for several months, court papers say. The exhibit is expected to generate about a quarter of the museum's annual revenues.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1999
CHICAGO -- Gale Gand recalls her favorite toy the way others speak of childhood's first bikes, pets and baseball gloves. Her early years were marked strictly BEB and AEB: Before Easy-Bake and After Easy-Bake.On Wednesday, she returns to the warmth of her childhood companion, the little oven that Gand unwrapped on her sixth Christmas. In the West Court of Chicago's cavernous Museum of Science and Industry, the award-winning pastry chef will light up her 100-watt-bulb-powered Easy-Bake and make magic for the crowd.
FEATURES
June 30, 1998
Battle of the BeastsIf this year's Winter Olympics in Nagano left you hungry for more sporting action, there's a new competition being played out in the jungles, deserts and forests across the planet. The Animal Olympics, presented by the Discovery Channel, feature the fastest runners, the highest jumpers and the strongest wrestlers. Pounce onto http://animal.discovery.com/ and discover the sheer athleticism possessed by such animals as the wind scorpion, the desert lynx and the estuarine crocodile.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | April 20, 1997
Reggie didn't get it."Who cares about some guy who died nearly 500 years ago?" she groused in the museum lobby, one eye on the shopping mall across the street.That this particular "guy" happened to be Leonardo da Vinci, one of the most creative thinkers of all time, didn't make any difference. Nor was my 11-year-old daughter moved to learn that this massive (15,000-square-foot) Boston Museum of Science exhibit is the largest ever to explore da Vinci's brilliance as a scientist and inventor as well as an artist.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | April 20, 1997
Reggie didn't get it."Who cares about some guy who died nearly 500 years ago?" she groused in the museum lobby, one eye on the shopping mall across the street.That this particular "guy" happened to be Leonardo da Vinci, one of the most creative thinkers of all time, didn't make any difference. Nor was my 11-year-old daughter moved to learn that this massive (15,000-square-foot) Boston Museum of Science exhibit is the largest ever to explore da Vinci's brilliance as a scientist and inventor as well as an artist.
TRAVEL
February 10, 2002
While swishing and spitting (instead of savoring and swallowing) may sound like a crime against good wine, it's the only way to go at the third annual Washington, D.C., International Wine Festival -- if you want to stay upright, that is. The event, which takes place March 2-3, draws representatives from more than 220 wineries in 12 countries -- all of whom will be pouring a combined total of more than 1,800 wines for tasting. Designated drivers aren't left out in the cold, though. Fine Cooking magazine presents a celebrity-chef stage where gourmets demonstrate their skills (and you reap the rewards in samples and take-home recipes)
FEATURES
June 30, 1998
Battle of the BeastsIf this year's Winter Olympics in Nagano left you hungry for more sporting action, there's a new competition being played out in the jungles, deserts and forests across the planet. The Animal Olympics, presented by the Discovery Channel, feature the fastest runners, the highest jumpers and the strongest wrestlers. Pounce onto http://animal.discovery.com/ and discover the sheer athleticism possessed by such animals as the wind scorpion, the desert lynx and the estuarine crocodile.
FEATURES
By Michael Kilian and Michael Kilian,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 6, 1997
It's a portrait of genius.In 15,000 square feet of paintings, drawings, artifacts, working models of extraordinary inventions, theatrical presentations and interactive displays, the Boston Museum of Science is presenting in its only American venue nothing less than the life and work of perhaps the greatest genius of Western civilization: Leonardo da Vinci, the original Renaissance Man.Somehow, 15,000 square feet doesn't seem sufficient.Called "Leonardo da Vinci: Scientist, Inventor, Artist," the show could just as logically have its title reversed.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | March 9, 1997
Calling all kids (and parents) who groan at the mere mention of a museum. Boston's for you.I can't think of a better place to convert museum-haters (including the one who lives in my house) to enthusiastic museum-goers. That's because almost every museum in Boston has designed child-friendly exhibits guaranteed to engage even the most reluctant (read: "When can we go back to the hotel and swim?") youngster. He won't have time to think about being bored because he'll be busy unraveling the Mystery of the Mummy at the Museum of Fine Arts, writing backward like Leonardo da Vinci at the Museum of Science, or trying out the experts' picks of the best children's software at the Computer Museum, the only one of its kind.
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