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By SLOANE BROWN | December 16, 2007
What 2-year-old gets Little Richard to perform at his birthday party? A two-year-old known as the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture. A two-year-old whose founding chair was renowned attorney and former judge George L. Russell Jr. And hundreds turned out at Cockeysville's Valley Mansion to celebrate both the museum and the man at the 2007 Annual Gala. "This is an exceptional night. It's a long time coming for George Russell. He's a giant in this community.
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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
Gefilte fish, the beloved Jewish preparation of slow simmered ground fish, takes the front burner on Sunday at GefilteFest, a full day of cooking crafts, music and storytelling for the whole family at the Jewish Museum of Maryland. Organized in conjunction with the ongoing exhibition "Chosen Food: Cuisine, Culture and American Jewish Identify," GefilteFest will feature a visit from the folks of Gefilteria , a Brooklyn-N.Y.-based "purveyor of boutique gefilte Old Wold Jewish foods" and will culminate, at 2 p.m., in a "Gefilte Fish Throwdown," pitting Gefilteria's Liz Alpern against Wit & Wisdom 's Dave Whaley and Pikesville's own Susan Silbiger, for the chance to be crowned Gefilte Maven.
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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2003
Responding to a female rabbi's invitation, 55 women from their 30s to their 70s showed up at the Jewish Museum of Maryland yesterday to write stories of their lives for the museum's archives. The rabbi, Nina Beth Cardin, said yesterday's event was the first such writing exercise at the museum, and was designed to preserve pieces of women's lives and minds at the turn of this century -- pieces that might otherwise pass unnoticed. "This will give us a view of Baltimore as it hasn't been recorded before," Cardin told the group.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | April 2, 2012
Thirty-one years ago, Doris Ligon had a vision. She wanted to educate the community, young people in particular, about the historical and cultural significance of African art. “My husband and I felt as though we had the energy to make a difference through education in the way people perceive the continent of Africa,” Ligon, founder of the African Art Museum of Maryland, says. Indeed, the museum, which has free admission, is an extensive educational resource with about 3,000 pieces of art. The objects, which come from all over Africa, include dolls, teapots, figurines, masks and much more.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | March 8, 1998
If the Jewish Museum of Maryland had less faith in the city, it might have bailed out long ago.Surrounded by public housing, vacant lots and rundownwarehouses, its property near Lloyd and Lombard streets in East Baltimore hardly seems the ideal spot to build a $2.3 million expansion.But if museum directors had left the area for more tourist-friendly environs, they never could have created the gem that opens today.The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Building is the most noble of architectural works -- a structure that not only grows out of its surroundings but strengthens them.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL OLLOVE and MICHAEL OLLOVE,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2002
Avi Decter has been doing some thinking about Jewish mothers lately, and that has led him to an arresting conclusion. "You don't have to be Jewish to be a Jewish mother," the voluble director of the Jewish Museum of Maryland, observed recently. "You don't have to be a mother to be a Jewish mother. You don't even have to be a woman to be a Jewish mother." An amusing and insightful notion, to be sure, but one that wouldn't have come to much had it occurred to most of us. A witticism at the dinner table perhaps, or maybe an e-mail to a friend.
NEWS
By Fay Lande and Fay Lande,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1998
Tucked away on the second floor of Oakland Mansion, the two rooms that make up the African Art Museum of Maryland are elegant, exotic and small.A traditional Ibibio wood carving of a girl's head with a long, graceful neck, which might have been an ornament for a staff, sits in a glass case next to a beaded purse. The girl's face is stained earth red for beauty; her eyes are cowrie shells. Her lips, barely smiling, convey an inner life.In the second room, the branches of a truncated pear tree form heads of spirits and the bodies of women holding babies.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1998
Lillian Braiterman Crane took one look yesterday at a photo on display in the newly expanded Jewish Museum of Maryland, and the memories came flooding back.The photo depicted a teen-ager who secretly left his home in Maryland to enlist in the Jewish Legion, an all-Jewish fighting force organized by the British army during World War I to free Palestine from Turkish control. It was her brother, William Braiterman, who enlisted under an alias so he wouldn't be rejected from service."He didn't tell my mother where he was going, and he lied about his age because he was only 17, and he had to eat a lot of bananas so he would weigh enough, but he got in," Crane said.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | June 30, 1998
Bernard Fishman, director of the Jewish Museum of Maryland for the past 13 years and the person behind its remarkable success story, will leave at the end of August to become director of the Lehigh County Historical Society in Pennsylvania.As the position here did when he took it in 1985, Lehigh County offers the kind of challenge Fishman welcomes. "It's a little bit larger than the Jewish Museum but somewhat similar in its general outlines," he said. "It has two historical sites and an imposing collection of materials related to the region and going back to the 18th century.
NEWS
February 22, 2006
The "Roots of Howard County in Celebration of African American History" on Sunday included visits to the African Art Museum of Maryland and the Howard County Center of African American Culture, music and speakers. The observance was held in partnership with the African Art Museum of Maryland, Howard County Center of African American Culture, the villages of Dorsey's Search, Harper's Choice, Long Reach, Owen Brown, River Hill, Town Center and Wilde Lake, and the Columbia Association.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | January 10, 2012
The best consumer advice for those attending the current exhibit at the Jewish Museum of Maryland is: Plan on going out to eat immediately after the show. "Chosen Food: Cuisine, Culture and American Jewish Identity" is brimming with delicious information about brisket, challah, bagels, matzoh balls, potato latkes, gefilte fish and other foods guaranteed to spark an appetite. Through text panels, photographs and actual kitchen objects, the exhibit is a multi-course exploration of how Jewish identity is established at the dinner table as much as in a synagogue service.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | December 8, 2011
The best consumer advice for those attending the current exhibit at the Jewish Museum of Maryland is: Plan on going out to eat immediately after the show. "Chosen Food: Cuisine, Culture and American Jewish Identity" is brimming with delicious information about brisket, challah, bagels, matzoh balls, potato latkes, gefilte fish and more guaranteed to spark an appetite. Through text panels, photographs and actual kitchen objects, the exhibit is a multi-course exploration of how Jewish identity is established at the dinner table as much as in a synagogue service.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandy Alexander, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
When the staff and contributors at the Jewish Museum of Maryland were putting together the new exhibit "Chosen Food: Cuisine, Culture, and American Jewish Identity," they knew better than to try and tell people what is Jewish food and what is not. If a matzo ball is pretty clearly Jewish food, does a low-fat version with chives still count? Is falafel Jewish? Is hummus? Can sushi be Jewish if it's served at Jewish weddings? Where does lo mein fit in? According to curator Karen Falk, questions like those, and the way they are linked to larger conversations about religious, ethical and cultural values, are at the heart of the exhibit, which opens Oct. 23 and runs through September 2012.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | June 3, 2011
The thematic links established between blacks and Jews are as clear as the glass used in the mosaics displayed in the Jewish Museum of Maryland exhibit "Loring Cornish: In Each Other's Shoes. " His intention is to demonstrate how two historically oppressed groups have more in common than they sometimes realize. A black artist who lives in Baltimore, Cornish was working on civil rights-related artwork several years ago when he met a Jewish couple. As he explains in an exhibit statement: "Everything changed.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun staff | September 15, 2010
University of Maryland men's basketball head coach Gary Williams will be joined by a few more special guests when he is inducted into the Sports Legends Museum's Hall of Legends on Thursday, Sept. 30 at the Hippodrome in Baltimore. Guests added to the event include former Terps basketball standout and NBA first-round pick Steve Francis, University of Minnesota men's basketball coach Tubby Smith, Loyola men's basketball coach and former Maryland assistant Jimmy Patsos and Tony Massenburg, who played for Williams at Maryland from 1989-90.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2009
Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture : The mezzanine of the Lyric Opera House was packed with people enjoying the annual gala of the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture. The air practically popped with excitement during the cocktail hour before the performance by Ashford & Simpson. There was so much to celebrate. For philanthropist Sylvia Brown, it was the museum itself. For Carla Hayden, Enoch Pratt Free Library CEO, it was the evening's honorees, Brown and her husband, Eddie Brown.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 24, 2003
Fire Museum of Maryland open for summer season LUTHERVILLE -- The Fire Museum of Maryland, which depicts the history of firefighting with exhibits, games and dozens of fire engines, is open for the summer season. The museum, at 1301 York Road, is open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday through August, and Saturdays from September to December. Admission is $6 for adults; $5 for firefighters and senior citizens; and $4 for ages 3 to 18. Information: 410-321-7500.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GLENN MCNATT | September 6, 2007
She was born Judith Sylvia Cohen in 1939, but the world knows her as the pioneering feminist artist Judy Chicago, whose installation The Dinner Party (1974-79), which celebrated important women throughout history, became a leader of the women's movement. Now a new exhibition at the Jewish Museum of Maryland explores how Chicago's secular Jewish upbringing shaped her artistic vision and her compassionate identification with the plight of oppressed people the world over. Judy Chicago: Jewish Identity presents artworks from throughout her career that challenge injustice and express the artist's long-standing aspiration for universal tolerance, understanding and peace.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ARIANE SZU-TU | June 12, 2008
STEAMED UP The Fire Museum of Maryland holds its 31st Annual Steam Show & Bull Roast on Saturday. The museum brings out its collection of steam engine models, including an 1899 engine. There will be contests for children and demonstrations of a horse-drawn hose wagon. Iconic Dalmations, long believed to have a calming effect on horses, will ride the engines and "guard" the horses. A fee applies for the bull roast. ....................... The steam show runs 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Fire Museum of Maryland, 1301 York Road, Lutherville.
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