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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | May 21, 2000
Shades of the days of ships steaming into Baltimore's harbor returned to the Baltimore Museum of Industry for its "Steamboat Landing Party." More than 500 partygoers bustled among the museum's working exhibits, sampling a sumptuous buffet and playing casino-style games. If they took a walk outside, they could get a gander at the real thing, the 1906 steam tug Baltimore. Among those enjoying a taste of traveling back in time: George Kirkley, event committee chair; Marc Seinfeld, event committee member; Raymond J. Piechocki, Baltimore Museum of Industry board chair; Margaret Fielding, Lou Kistner and Ron Bray, board members; William Cole, museum interim executive director; Eliza Bulley, WBAL-TV producer; Richard Davidson, president of Davidson Transfer & Storage; Suzanne Wolff, community relations manager with Mercantile Bank; Bill Ewing, Maryland Food Bank executive director; Lynn Lockwood, Baltimore County Public Library assistant director; Steve Duklewski, principal with Harvest Investment Consultants; Alison Stewart, teacher at Maryvale Preparatory School for Girls; and Matt Jackson, ATM America vice president.
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FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Date: March 29 Her story: Annabelle Alberts, 30, grew up in Detroit. She lived in New York City for 31/2 years before moving to Maryland in September 2012. She is the manager of marketing for Deloitte Forensic in Baltimore. Her parents, Marcia and Mike Alberts, live in Bloomfield Hills, Mich. His story: Scott Palagyi, 31, was born in Pittsburgh but grew up in York, Pa. He spent seven years working in Ohio for Procter & Gamble before being relocated to Baltimore about three years ago. He is the northeast distributions center operations leader for Procter & Gamble in Hunt Valley.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | October 14, 2001
If you're going to call your fund-raiser "Steamboat Landing 2001," it's a good idea to have both steamboat and landing on hand. Good thing this was the Baltimore Museum of Industry's annual shindig, because both were parked right outside the South Baltimore building. "There are only two working steam tugboats in the entire U.S., one in California, and this one. It's a historic landmark," said museum volunteer coordinator Rob Williams, referring to the 1906 tug Baltimore tied up at the dock.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
The leaders of central Maryland's various jurisdictions will haggle and negotiate in the coming months over what regional transportation projects to prioritize over the next two-and-a-half decades — and officials are looking for ideas from the public. The Baltimore Regional Transportation Board must update the region's 25-year transportation priorities every four years, making them eligible for federal funding. "We're looking for long-range, regional thinking, not filling the pothole on your street," said Terry Freeland, senior transportation policy planner at the Baltimore Metropolitan Council.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2003
John C. Scott, a longtime Baltimore Museum of Industry volunteer who helped restore the old steam tug Baltimore to operation there, died of heart failure Saturday at his Roland Park home. He was 54. Born in Washington and raised on Keswick Road in Roland Park, Mr. Scott was a 1967 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School. After brief service in the Navy, he earned his bachelor's degree in 1974 from what is now Towson University. Mr. Scott, who had lived on Schenley Road since 1978, worked for many years as an industrial inspector in the state Department of the Environment's Air and Radiation Management Administration.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun columnist | November 26, 2006
Any important city builds on its history, preserving distinguished architecture but recycling other land as aesthetics and economics demand. But it also needs properties like the one at 1415 Key Highway, which serves past and present in equal measure. Overlooking the harbor toward Fells Point, the tract once bore an oyster and produce cannery, a vinegar distillery and a shipbuilder. Now it's a shrine to the companies, workers and hardware that made Baltimore great, and a wedding and bar mitzvah venue on weekends.
NEWS
April 22, 2000
DENNIS ZEMBALA is one of Baltimore's unsung heroes. Two decades ago, he took over a one-room collection of odds and ends and built it into the Museum of Industry, an exhibit and research center chronicling this city's smokestack past. Mr. Zembala's energetic leadership here is now coming to an end: He has been named director of the Detroit Historical Museums by Mayor Dennis W. Archer. The appointment is a crowning achievement for Mr. Zembala, 57. He will return to his native city to oversee an institution that includes two city sites, as well as the Great Lakes Maritime Museum and historic Fort Wayne, which was an active military base through the Vietnam war and houses tributes to Native Americans and the Tuskegee airmen.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1998
Tara Mullligan sat at the 1880s-era foot-powered Singer sewing machine. She pumped the pedal in exasperated fits and starts, but couldn't get a smooth rhythm going."
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Evening Sun Staff | November 1, 1990
SUZZANNE CASH started the day as boss of the oyster shuckers and ended it as president of one of Baltimore's oldest and largest oyster canneries. She liked overseeing the shucking, she said, but she didn't seem to mind taking over the big wooden desk in the office with a view of Baltimore harbor.Just outside the office door, a line of shuckers was working quickly, opening the shells, plucking out the ersatz oysters, putting them in buckets and calling to the loaders for more.Nearby, fillers were waiting to put oysters into cans, cap the containers and send them to the steamer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2003
The Baltimore Museum of Industry has long been the perfect place to celebrate the city's rich industrial past. Founded in 1977, the museum has continually worked at educating visitors about the city's industrial, maritime and labor heritage. And while it's always been an appropriate learning center for young visitors, the hands-on museum is seeking to become an even more family-friendly place with the summer program Family Fun Days. Beginning this Saturday and running through August, the program allows young visitors to enjoy interactive activities at many of the museum's exhibits, including the Food Processing/Cannery exhibit, the Blacksmith and Print Shop, the Garment Loft and the Transportation Gallery.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
The Museum of Industry announced Monday it had received a surprise donation from Unilever of roughly two dozen boxes of photographs, documents, and advertising materials related to Noxzema, the widely-used skin cream first sold in the early 1900s from a North Avenue pharmacy in Baltimore. Baltimore pharmacist George Bunting, who named his company the Noxell Corp., later expanded into other areas, including CoverGirl cosmetics. Noxell had about 1,400 Hunt Valley employees in 1989, when Procter & Gamble bought the business for $1.3 billion.
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2013
Wedded: Jade Eaves and Christopher McArdle Date: June 8, 2013 Her story: Jade Eaves, 27, grew up in Locust Point. She is a philanthropy associate at Sheppard Pratt. Her mother, Cindy Eaves, lives in Locust Point. Her father, Dan Macatee, is the owner of Hull Street Blues Cafe in Locust Point. He lives in Harford County with his wife, Kathy. His story: Christopher "Chris" McArdle, 37, is originally from Northern Virginia but moved to Maryland in 1998.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
Baltimore will show off its biggest trucks Saturday and allow young residents to meet police officers, firefighters and others who drive the big rigs through city streets. The Biggest Big Truck Show brings about 20 vehicles to the Baltimore Museum of Industry. The event runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 1415 Key Highway. Visitors can see, touch, even take a seat in many among the fleet of vehicles, including Big Bertha, Baltimore's largest tow truck, fire engine, motorcycles and a fireboat that will shoot up massive plumes of water.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2011
A man's body was pulled Tuesday morning from shallow waters of the Inner Harbor near the 1400 block of Key Highway, Baltimore police said. The body was found about 8 a.m., police said, near a stretch of Key Highway home to the Baltimore Museum of Industry. jtorbati@baltsun.com
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 8, 2009
William H. Cole III, a banker and pragmatic problem solver who in retirement put his knowledge of finance to work for fledgling Baltimore businesses and other institutions, died of leukemia and skin cancer complications Friday at his South Baltimore home. He was 73. Born in Cecil County, he was a 1954 graduate of the West Nottingham Academy in Colora and remained an active alumnus. In a 2001 school publication, he recalled the life lessons learned as a football player: "It was such a small school, we all had to learn from each other," he said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | June 13, 2009
Edward Gerard Novak, a retired banker who had served as the chairman of the boards of the Baltimore Museum of Industry and the Maryland Food Bank, died Sunday of prostate cancer at University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 55 and lived in Baldwin. Mr. Novak, the son of a Westinghouse Electric Corp. worker and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and spent his early years in Violetville. In the 1960s, he moved with his family to Eldersburg and graduated in 1973 from South Carroll High School.
NEWS
July 17, 2008
EPA report faults agency's bay efforts The Environmental Protection Agency needs to do more not only to clean up the Chesapeake Bay but also to let the public know where it is falling short on the effort, according to a report released yesterday. The report, by the EPA's Office of Inspector General, said the federal agency needs to work with local governments in the bay's six-state watershed to make sure their land-use practices are helping to protect the bay. It calls on the EPA to outline for Congress how much money it is spending on cleanup actions and how much progress it is making.
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