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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | November 5, 1991
To look at the ceramics of Gertrud and Otto Natzler is to know what Cole Porter meant when he wrote "You're the Top."The Natzlers' classic modern ceramics, part of the "Maryland Collects" exhibit at the National Museum of Ceramic Art, have about them nothing of the tour de force, the showy, the attention-getting gesture. Vases and bowls of no great size, often of a single (if modulated) color, they are quiet, pure expressions of utter beauty.They put to flight my long-held belief that collaboration must result in works of art that reveal evidence of compromise.
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NEWS
July 30, 2003
At-large members sought for education advisory committee The Citizens Advisory Committee to the Board of Education is seeking at-large members for the 2003-2004 school year. The group of citizens and representatives from local PTAs serves in an advisory capacity to the elected school board. The CAC sponsors educational programming for members and provides them with the opportunity to study and provide input into curriculum, education policy, redistricting and budgets. The committee generally meets at 7:30 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month in the boardroom at the Department of Education in Ellicott City.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | March 24, 1992
The whiteness of Paula Winokur's ceramic landscape sculptures only adds to their dreamlike surrealism. They consist of horizontal planes from which rise verticals asymmetrically placed to create a tension of space, and their different sizes create the illusion of a vastness of scale. Sometimes there are markings on the horizontal, as if left there by an ancient culture.These have the effect of placing the viewer in some limbo between strangeness and familiarity, as in a dream we think we recognize a place yet cannot identify it. The suggestion of long-deserted sites of some former civilization -- one of them even named "Avebury, Site I" after the Neolithic site in England -- adds the eerie feeling of an unseen presence, lingering and silently watching; and the way in which the smaller vertical element echoes the larger gives one almost the sense of some sound that cannot quite be heard.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | April 16, 1997
In terms of self-promotion, Muhammad Ali had nothing on George Ohr, who called himself "Unequalled! Unrivaled! Undisputed! Greatest Art Potter on Earth!"And he wasn't far from right, as visitors to the current, extensive show of his works at Evergreen House can readily see.Ohr (1857-1918) was born, lived and died in Biloxi, Miss., and called himself "The Mad Potter of Biloxi." He had some training in New Orleans when he was in his early twenties and traveled extensively in this country both to show his wares at international fairs and to learn about ceramics, from ancient Greek vases to contemporary folk pottery.
NEWS
July 30, 2003
At-large members sought for education advisory committee The Citizens Advisory Committee to the Board of Education is seeking at-large members for the 2003-2004 school year. The group of citizens and representatives from local PTAs serves in an advisory capacity to the elected school board. The CAC sponsors educational programming for members and provides them with the opportunity to study and provide input into curriculum, education policy, redistricting and budgets. The committee generally meets at 7:30 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month in the boardroom at the Department of Education in Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Staff Writer | January 27, 1993
Her hands covered with hardened clay, 13-year-old Elaine Marshall proudly shows off a creation lying on a worktable at the National Museum of Ceramic Art. Her work has a forked tongue, sharp toes and bulging eyes that stare tauntingly back at her."It's a gargoyle and it's three animals in one -- just like the one in the picture -- if you can't tell," said Elaine, a seventh-grader at Francis Scott Key Middle School. "It's the way I saw it, the way I feel about it."This month, Elaine and other students from city middle schools have expressed themselves in clay at the museum, located near the Inner Harbor at 250 W. Pratt St.The students and their art teachers have been going to the museum for daylong workshops in which they work with ceramics instructors and art education teachers from the graduate art program at Towson State University.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | May 20, 1992
A ceramics show that ranges from the elegance of a Chinese export porcelain urn to the cheerfully bold colors of Gaudy Dutch and Gaudy Welsh, from a garden seat to a watch holder, from a pair of beautiful Chamberlain Worcester sauce tureens to charming Staffordshire creamers in the form of cows, is a show with something to suit just about every taste.And that's both the strength and the weakness of "18th & 19th Century Utilitarian Porcelain & Pottery" at the National Museum of Ceramic Art.The show's name alone implies the breadth of this exhibit of some 100 pieces.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | March 24, 1992
The whiteness of Paula Winokur's ceramic landscape sculptures only adds to their dreamlike surrealism. They consist of horizontal planes from which rise verticals asymmetrically placed to create a tension of space, and their different sizes create the illusion of a vastness of scale. Sometimes there are markings on the horizontal, as if left there by an ancient culture.These have the effect of placing the viewer in some limbo between strangeness and familiarity, as in a dream we think we recognize a place yet cannot identify it. The suggestion of long-deserted sites of some former civilization -- one of them even named "Avebury, Site I" after the Neolithic site in England -- adds the eerie feeling of an unseen presence, lingering and silently watching; and the way in which the smaller vertical element echoes the larger gives one almost the sense of some sound being whispered that cannot quite be heard.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | May 19, 1992
A ceramics show that ranges from the elegance of a Chinese export porcelain urn to the cheerfully bold colors of Gaudy Dutch and Gaudy Welsh, from a garden seat to a watch holder, from a pair of beautiful Chamberlain Worcester sauce tureens to charming Staffordshire creamers in the form of cows, is a show with something to suit just about every taste. And that's both the strength and the weakness of "18th and 19th Century Utilitarian Porcelain and Pottery" at the National Museum of Ceramic Art.The show's name alone implies the breadth of this exhibit of some 100 pieces.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | September 28, 1990
Ceramic SculptureWhen: Tuesdays through Fridays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., through Dec. 30.Where: The National Museum of Ceramic Art, 250 West Pratt St.ll: 837-2529.American EnamelsWhen: Tuesdays through Saturdays 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., through Oct. 8.Where: Holtzman Gallery, Towson State University.ll: 830-2808.It has become a cliche to assert that the line between crafand fine art is a mirage, but the assertion keeps getting made, as in two local shows. Of the two, one makes the point more successfully than the other.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | September 25, 1993
One thing very Dutch about contemporary Dutch ceramics, says Olaf Stevens, is their diversity."You see ceramics in Scandinavia or France, for instance, and you say, yes, this is typically French or Scandinavian. With Dutch ceramics it's quite diverse what people make. They are more individualists. They like to stand out from what's going on. The attitude is, I have to do something different."There are, however, some unifying characteristics."It is possible to whisper, or to speak, or to shout," says Netty van den Heuvel.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Staff Writer | January 27, 1993
Her hands covered with hardened clay, 13-year-old Elaine Marshall proudly shows off a creation lying on a worktable at the National Museum of Ceramic Art. Her work has a forked tongue, sharp toes and bulging eyes that stare tauntingly back at her."It's a gargoyle and it's three animals in one -- just like the one in the picture -- if you can't tell," said Elaine, a seventh-grader at Francis Scott Key Middle School. "It's the way I saw it, the way I feel about it."This month, Elaine and other students from city middle schools have expressed themselves in clay at the museum, located near the Inner Harbor at 250 W. Pratt St.The students and their art teachers have been going to the museum for daylong workshops in which they work with ceramics instructors and art education teachers from the graduate art program at Towson State University.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | May 20, 1992
A ceramics show that ranges from the elegance of a Chinese export porcelain urn to the cheerfully bold colors of Gaudy Dutch and Gaudy Welsh, from a garden seat to a watch holder, from a pair of beautiful Chamberlain Worcester sauce tureens to charming Staffordshire creamers in the form of cows, is a show with something to suit just about every taste.And that's both the strength and the weakness of "18th & 19th Century Utilitarian Porcelain & Pottery" at the National Museum of Ceramic Art.The show's name alone implies the breadth of this exhibit of some 100 pieces.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | May 19, 1992
A ceramics show that ranges from the elegance of a Chinese export porcelain urn to the cheerfully bold colors of Gaudy Dutch and Gaudy Welsh, from a garden seat to a watch holder, from a pair of beautiful Chamberlain Worcester sauce tureens to charming Staffordshire creamers in the form of cows, is a show with something to suit just about every taste. And that's both the strength and the weakness of "18th and 19th Century Utilitarian Porcelain and Pottery" at the National Museum of Ceramic Art.The show's name alone implies the breadth of this exhibit of some 100 pieces.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | March 24, 1992
The whiteness of Paula Winokur's ceramic landscape sculptures only adds to their dreamlike surrealism. They consist of horizontal planes from which rise verticals asymmetrically placed to create a tension of space, and their different sizes create the illusion of a vastness of scale. Sometimes there are markings on the horizontal, as if left there by an ancient culture.These have the effect of placing the viewer in some limbo between strangeness and familiarity, as in a dream we think we recognize a place yet cannot identify it. The suggestion of long-deserted sites of some former civilization -- one of them even named "Avebury, Site I" after the Neolithic site in England -- adds the eerie feeling of an unseen presence, lingering and silently watching; and the way in which the smaller vertical element echoes the larger gives one almost the sense of some sound being whispered that cannot quite be heard.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | March 24, 1992
The whiteness of Paula Winokur's ceramic landscape sculptures only adds to their dreamlike surrealism. They consist of horizontal planes from which rise verticals asymmetrically placed to create a tension of space, and their different sizes create the illusion of a vastness of scale. Sometimes there are markings on the horizontal, as if left there by an ancient culture.These have the effect of placing the viewer in some limbo between strangeness and familiarity, as in a dream we think we recognize a place yet cannot identify it. The suggestion of long-deserted sites of some former civilization -- one of them even named "Avebury, Site I" after the Neolithic site in England -- adds the eerie feeling of an unseen presence, lingering and silently watching; and the way in which the smaller vertical element echoes the larger gives one almost the sense of some sound that cannot quite be heard.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | September 25, 1993
One thing very Dutch about contemporary Dutch ceramics, says Olaf Stevens, is their diversity."You see ceramics in Scandinavia or France, for instance, and you say, yes, this is typically French or Scandinavian. With Dutch ceramics it's quite diverse what people make. They are more individualists. They like to stand out from what's going on. The attitude is, I have to do something different."There are, however, some unifying characteristics."It is possible to whisper, or to speak, or to shout," says Netty van den Heuvel.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | November 5, 1991
To look at the ceramics of Gertrud and Otto Natzler is to know what Cole Porter meant when he wrote "You're the Top."The Natzlers' classic modern ceramics, part of the "Maryland Collects" exhibit at the National Museum of Ceramic Art, have about them nothing of the tour de force, the showy, the attention-getting gesture. Vases and bowls of no great size, often of a single (if modulated) color, they are quiet, pure expressions of utter beauty.They put to flight my long-held belief that collaboration must result in works of art that reveal evidence of compromise.
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