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November 16, 1995
Sure, you can go the traditional route and take in the Baltimore Museum of Art or the Maryland Historical Society or the Walters Art Gallery, but why not head off the beaten museum path and check out something really different? Here are some options:B. Olive Cole Pharmacy Museum, 650 W. Lombard St. Hours: by appointment. Free. Phone: (410) 727-0746. Named for one of the first female graduates of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, the facility includes a replica of a 1900 vintage pharmacy and a variety of rare objects, including apothecary jars, mortars and pestles and root grinders.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
Seth Adelsberger is a 34-year-old Baltimore painter and printmaker. He does not have a master's degree from an art school, he is not represented by a gallery, and he has not won a prestigious prize. Nonetheless, on Sunday, a solo show that distills Adelsberger's visual experiments over the past five years opens at the Baltimore Museum of Art . The exhibit is an unusual honor for an unproven painter, signaling to the art world nationwide that museum curators think Adelsberger is a talent worth watching.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | October 29, 1998
For a juried exhibition of American contemporary craft, attend the 22nd annual Philadelphia Museum of Art Craft Show today through Sunday at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. The work of 195 craftspeople, selected from more than 1,600 applicants, will be on display, including basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, wearable fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper and wood.An installation of whimsical, beautiful and fantastical masks also is part of this year's show.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
William Voss Elder III, a retired Baltimore Museum of Art curator who helped first lady Jacqueline Kennedy during the 1960s bring antique furnishing to the White House, died of heart failure Thursday at Northwest Hospital. The Upperco resident was 82. In more than three decades at the Baltimore Museum of Art , he enlarged its collections of furniture, glass, porcelain, textiles and silver, and rescued architectural treasures by salvaging doomed interiors for reinstatement as period rooms.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | April 22, 2001
Some house-warming party. The Baltimore Museum of Art shimmered in flowery splendor at the Cone Gala, celebrating the reopening of the Cone Collection. A gargantuan pair of dazzling floral creations at the BMA's front door was only the first hint of what was waiting inside. In the museum's front hall, massive spheres of flowers swung above while 600 guests swirled below. Even before dinner, partygoers satiated themselves on a visual buffet. There were tours of the newly renovated Cone Wing and its world-famous collection of art by Matisse, Picasso, Gauguin, van Gogh and others.
FEATURES
By Kevin Brown | October 18, 1990
Eight films, spanning a broad range of Soviet film styles and eras, will be shown at the 12th annual Claire Walker Russian Film Festival today through Saturday and Oct. 25 and 26 at the Baltimore Museum of Art.The festival, presented by the Baltimore Film Forum and the Center of Russian Language and Culture (CORLAC) at Friends School, will open at 7:30 tonight with Andrei Tarkovsky's "Solaris," based on science fiction by Stanislaw Lem.Friday's screenings include Isaac Fridberg's "The Little Doll," telling the story of a small child who was thrust into a strict gymnastic training, at 7:30 p.m., and Olga Narutskaya's "Tamara Alexandrovna's Husband and Daughter," a drama about a little girl who goes to live with her father after her divorced mother is hospitalized, at 10 p.m.Director Sergei Bodrov's "Card Sharpers," a crime thriller, is about a ex-gangster who must play cards with a crime boss to win the release of his lover and her daughter, who are being held hostage.
FEATURES
March 22, 1991
The Baltimore Museum of Art has been given Morris Louis' 1958 painting "Dalet Beth," which BMA director Arnold Lehman described as "one of the most significant single gifts of modern art in the museum's history."The abstract work, part of the Baltimore-born artist's celebrated "Veil" paintings, has been on loan to the BMA for a decade. It was donated by Louis' widow, Marcella Louis Brenner, a national trustee of the museum since 1982. The gift was made, according to a BMA statement, "in recognition of the museum's commitment to build the projected new west wing for modern art, scheduled for completion in 1993."
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | August 10, 2008
If you think a museum is always a place of quiet contemplation, you weren't at the Baltimore Museum of Art's Annual Meeting and Reception. The decibel level (and the excitement level) in the BMA's Atrium Court resembled something more along the lines of a high-school pep rally. The reason wasn't just the official kickoff of the museum's $65 million philanthropic campaign, but the announcement that $40 million has already been raised. BMA board chair Stiles T. Colwill was walking on air. "This is a huge bonus, not just for the museum, but for Baltimore and the whole region," he said.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | July 20, 2008
People may come to the Baltimore Museum of Art to see the work of many internationally renowned artists, but a recent gathering there was to celebrate local talent. Six area artists, all finalists in the Janet & Walter Sondheim Prize competition, had work on display in a BMA exhibition. That work was the focus of attention for several hundred guests who wandered the galleries, many chatting with the artists themselves. Meanwhile, the museum's Fox Court was jammed with folks, enjoying music, drinks and hors d'oeuvres.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | October 12, 1997
IT WAS AN AFFAIR befitting a queen! Limos deposited formally dressed guests at a marquee entrance, where a red carpet, complete with palace guards, led the way into the Baltimore Museum of Art.After 10 years of planning, "A Grand Design: The Art of the Victoria and Albert Museum" was beginning its run. Opening-nighters, 600 people at $600 each, enjoyed a tour, cocktails and dinner -- the largest seated dinner ever held at the museum. Guests were greeted by Tony Deering, chairman of the BMA; Lord Armstrong of Ilminster, chairman of the Victoria and Albert Museum; major sponsors Carl Pascarella, president and CEO of Visa USA, and Vance Coffman, CEO and vice chairman of Lockheed Martin; Alan Borg, director of the V&A Museum; and Arnold Lehman, former BMA director and now director of the Brooklyn Museum of Art, who came back for the opening of the show he had spent 10 years putting together.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
A tiny Renoir landscape with a romantic back story will be unveiled March 30 at the Baltimore Museum of Art - 62 years, four months and 14 days since it last was seen publicly. "The Renoir Returns" will reunite the 1879 painting "Paysage Bords de Seine" with more than 20 artworks from the collection of the Baltimore heiress Saidie May, who bequeathed her entire estate to the museum after her death in 1951. "We are thrilled to welcome this charming painting back to the museum, to reintroduce it to the people of Baltimore and to reunite it with the many masterpieces from Saidie May's collection," museum director Doreen Bolger said in a news release.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2014
The little Renoir landscape looks so modest and guileless and transparent that a casual observer never would guess at the secrets the painting hides. "Paysage Bords de Seine" depicts a river and bushes. On that summer day in 1879, a sailboat was skimming along the River Seine. There were trees and clouds. The light was abundant. Viewers even can see the unpainted canvas peeking out from the frame. That unconcealed quality is what struck senior painting conservator Mary Sebera when she examined the water view for the first time after it was returned to the Baltimore Museum of Art for good on Jan. 31 after a 62-year absence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
The Baltimore Museum of Art has received its most significant gift of contemporary photography in more than 25 years. Baltimore collectors Tom and Nancy O'Neil have given the institution two dozen color and black-and-white works by 19 important artists of our time, including Dawoud Bey, celebrated for his portrait photography, and Edward Burtynsky, whose photos document humanity's impact on the environment. Among others represented in the collection are Rodney Graham, Naoya Hatakeyama, Richard Misrach and James Welling.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
A tiny water view painted by Pierre-Auguste Renoir is finally headed back to the city where a judge has ruled that it belongs — 62 years, one month and 24 days after it was reported stolen from the Baltimore Museum of Art . During a hearing Friday, Judge Leonie M. Brinkema of the U.S. District Court in Eastern Virginia granted the museum's request to throw out Marcia "Martha" Fuqua's ownership claim for the 1879 artwork, "Paysage Bords de...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
A federal court judge has turned down a request to throw out two documents that support the Baltimore Museum of Art 's contention that it should be awarded an 1879 Renoir landscape, "Paysage Bords de Seine. " The attorney for Marcia "Martha" Fuqua, a Virginia woman battling the BMA for ownership of the painting, had asked U.S. District Judge Leonie M. Brinkema not to consider declarations the museum included in a filing on Dec. 31. Made by Emily Rafferty, the museum's head librarian and archivist, and Frances Klapthor, the museum's registrar, the declarations address the circumstances under which the museum discovered a 1937 loan receipt and a catalog card for the artwork.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
The "Diner" guys, Tracy Turnblad and the moody teens of Hamilton will be basking in the New York spotlight this month, thanks to a Museum of Modern Art exhibition focusing on the works of Baltimore filmmakers Barry Levinson, John Waters and Matt Porterfield. "Our Town: Baltimore," running through Dec. 24 at the venerable Manhattan art showcase, opens Thursday with Levinson's 1982 "Diner," an ode to '50s-era Colts fanaticism and the shift from the easy answers of adolescence to the complicated relationships of adulthood.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | June 16, 1991
Jazz pianist and composer Don Pullen and dancer and choreographer Eva Anderson first performed together 30 years ago when they were students at North Carolina's Johnson C. Smith University."
FEATURES
October 2, 1994
It is burnished aluminum. It is Andy Warhol. It is all cool interiors and dramatic geometry. It is the New Wing for Modern Art at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Two years of construction and nearly a decade of planning have resulted in the museum's latest expansion -- 35,000 square feet cut into 16 galleries for modern art. Butting against the limestone exterior of the museum's Cone Wing, the new wing provides visitors with a visual break that takes them...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
A federal court judge set a hearing date Wednesday in the 15-month dispute over who owns a tiny Renoir painting that was stolen in 1951 from the Baltimore Museum of Art , but she also urged both parties to consider settling. The miniature landscape was part of a box of odds and ends in a rural flea market that was purchased by a Virginia woman in 2009 without knowing the value of the unsigned artwork. Since then, its ownership has been in question. During a pretrial conference in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, Judge Leonie M. Brinkema said she will hear arguments Jan. 10 on the museum's motion to be awarded ownership of the 1879 oil painting, "Paysage Bords de Seine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Guest blog post by Mary Carole McCauley/The Baltimore Sun The Baltimore Museum of Art announced Wednesday that it will reopen its historic entrance to visitors on Nov. 23, 2014, in celebration of the museum's 100th anniversary. The elegant portico roof designed in 1929 by the great American architect John Russell Pope is supported by six Ionic columns. The entrance, which is reached at the top of a flight of stairs, seems to float above the surrounding terrain. The exterior lighting is being updated, and after the renovation, the stairs will be used as a meeting place for visitors.
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