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By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | February 5, 2001
When the $26 million Maryland Museum of African American History and Culture opens in downtown Baltimore in the next several years, people won't have any trouble finding it. It will be the only predominantly black building near the Inner Harbor - a sharp contrast to others all around. Actually, the museum's exterior will feature all four colors of the Maryland flag - red, yellow, black and white. But the largest and most prominent wall will be almost entirely clad in black granite, and so will most of two other walls.
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By Edward Gents, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2012
When the country's largest museum devoted to African-American history and culture opens in Washington, Maryland people and places will get a healthy share of the limelight. A two-story log house built by freed slaves from Montgomery County, dubbed the Freedom House, is one of the largest single objects planned for display inside the $500 million museum, for which ground was broken Wednesday. Other Maryland-related objects include a silk shawl given to abolitionist Harriet Tubman by Britain's Queen Victoria, a hymn book used by Tubman and a first edition of abolitionist Frederick Douglass' autobiography.
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NEWS
October 16, 1997
Philip Ravenhill,52, chief curator at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African Art for the past 10 years, died of a heart attack Monday in Washington.An anthropologist with an interest in the visual arts, he joined the National Museum of African Art in 1987 and played a major role in selecting and recommending works for the museum to acquire.Adil Carcani,75, prime minister of Albania's last Stalinist government, died in Tirana, Albania, Monday after suffering a cerebral hemorrhage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | April 5, 2009
The history of the American Negro, the educator W.E.B. DuBois wrote in 1903, is the history of strife between opposing forces. "One ever feels his twoness - an American, a Negro; two warring souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body," DuBois wrote in The Souls of Black Folk. DuBois' thoughts are worth bearing in mind as one contemplates the designs proposed for Washington's next major museum, the Smithsonian's $500 million National Museum of African American History and Culture.
NEWS
March 17, 1993
'Homicide' star to discuss his book at African Art Youth GuildThe Maryland Museum of African Art will present actor Yaphet Kotto of television's "Homicide" at a meeting of the African Art Youth Guild from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Sunday at 5430 Vantage Point Road.Mr. Kotto will discuss his new book, "Royalty."The meeting is open to the public.Information: 730-7105.POLICE* Harpers Choice 5400 block of Cedar Lane: Someone smashed glass in a door at the Abbott House, and unlocked the door between 10:30 p.m. Thursday and 7:20 a.m. Friday.
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 15, 1996
Route 175, downtown Columbia's main thoroughfare, will be the gateway for a four-day jazz festival that starts tomorrow. The Maryland Museum of African Art Jazz Club will present the Baltimore-Washington Jazzfest over four days through Sunday at nine predominantly west Columbia venues. Organizers are calling it "Jazz is Alive on Route 175."Some like their jazz hot and others like it cool, but festival organizers say the music will cater to all kinds of tastes -- from swing, to be-bop to contemporary jazz.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby | January 20, 2002
In the '70s and '80s, the South African government systematically destroyed District Six, a multiracial community near Capetown, to create a "white area." Artist Sue Williamson visited the community in 1981, on the eve of the destruction of the last homes; the result was an installation called "The Last Supper." Twelve years later, Williamson revisited District Six, rebuilt as a white community. From bits of debris gathered on her return trip, she created "The Last Supper Revisited," now on view through Jan. 27 at the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art in Washington.
NEWS
By Clarice Scriber | January 31, 1991
Buried deep inside the Oakland neighborhood of Columbia resides a little-known treasure -- the Maryland Museum of African Art. One of a handful of American museums devoted exclusively to the exhibition of African art, this decade-old institution brings the African aesthetic alive to Marylanders who might not otherwise know it.From Gambia in the west to Ghana in the east, traditional African artifacts in the museum and gift shop depict the beauty and mystery...
NEWS
By HOLLAND COTTER and HOLLAND COTTER,New York Times News Service | August 5, 2007
African art has it all: beauty, brio, inventiveness, moral gravity, emotional depth, practicality, sensuality and humor. It's hot and cool, high and low, chastening and consoling, endlessly varied, surprising always. So why do our big museums still give us so few African shows? And why, when they do, are those shows so often packaged the same way? Third-tier Western artists get solo retrospectives; entire African cultures are squeezed into art-of-a-continent surveys. Many such surveys are collection samplers, the only thematic thread being the taste or money of a single owner or institution.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | October 30, 2007
Philip Freelon, one of the lead architects of the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture in Baltimore, will play a key role in shaping the even-larger African-American museum planned for the Mall in Washington. A team made up of Freelon's company, the Freelon Group of Research Triangle Park, N.C., and Davis Brody Bond of New York City has been selected to begin planning the project, which is expected to be the largest African-American museum in the country, a director of the National Museum of African American History and Culture said yesterday.
NEWS
By From Baltimore Sun news services | January 30, 2009
Mickey Rourke won't wrestle pro Chris Jericho A spokeswoman for actor Mickey Rourke says he won't be taking his role as a professional wrestler into a real-life ring after all. Paula Woods told the Associated Press that Rourke will not wrestle WWE superstar Chris Jericho at Wrestlemania 25 in April. Rourke, who plays pro wrestler Randy "The Ram" Robinson in the film The Wrestler, said Sunday at the Screen Actors Guild awards that he would toss Jericho "around the ring like tossed salad."
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | December 16, 2007
What 2-year-old gets Little Richard to perform at his birthday party? A two-year-old known as the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture. A two-year-old whose founding chair was renowned attorney and former judge George L. Russell Jr. And hundreds turned out at Cockeysville's Valley Mansion to celebrate both the museum and the man at the 2007 Annual Gala. "This is an exceptional night. It's a long time coming for George Russell. He's a giant in this community.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | October 30, 2007
Philip Freelon, one of the lead architects of the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture in Baltimore, will play a key role in shaping the even-larger African-American museum planned for the Mall in Washington. A team made up of Freelon's company, the Freelon Group of Research Triangle Park, N.C., and Davis Brody Bond of New York City has been selected to begin planning the project, which is expected to be the largest African-American museum in the country, a director of the National Museum of African American History and Culture said yesterday.
NEWS
By HOLLAND COTTER and HOLLAND COTTER,New York Times News Service | August 5, 2007
African art has it all: beauty, brio, inventiveness, moral gravity, emotional depth, practicality, sensuality and humor. It's hot and cool, high and low, chastening and consoling, endlessly varied, surprising always. So why do our big museums still give us so few African shows? And why, when they do, are those shows so often packaged the same way? Third-tier Western artists get solo retrospectives; entire African cultures are squeezed into art-of-a-continent surveys. Many such surveys are collection samplers, the only thematic thread being the taste or money of a single owner or institution.
NEWS
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | February 5, 2006
BY VIRTUE OF ITS WASHINGTON location and federal backing, the National Museum of African American History and Culture will have the opportunity and the mandate to tell a more sweeping story about the African-American experience than regional museums devoted to the same subject. The selection of a site on the National Mall, made official last week, will go a long way toward giving the institution the visibility and clout it needs to raise funds, collect artifacts and complete the building that will enable it to carry out its mission.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2005
More than 350 years have passed since the first enslaved Africans, taken forcibly from their homelands and sold to people in a land thousands of miles away, set foot in Maryland. Beginning this weekend, their stories and the stories of their descendants - the men and women of African heritage who have lived, toiled, suffered, thrived and died in a land sometimes called the Free State - will be told in a gleaming new $34 million museum on the eastern edge of Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Named for a pioneering black businessman and philanthropist, the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture, at 830 E. Pratt St., will open officially tomorrow.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2001
In the Region Bibelot files suit against Donna's, says rent payments missed Bibelot, the Baltimore-based bookseller in bankruptcy with $20 million in debt, is suing its tenant, Donna's Coffee Bar and Cafe, for $140,000, alleging breach of contract. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Baltimore, claims that Donna's missed rent payments and failed to pay late-payment interest for its restaurants in Bibelot bookstores. Donna's co-owner Alan Hirsch, who plans to continue operating the restaurants in Baltimore, Pikesville and Timonium, countered that Bibelot breached the lease by changing store hours after the March bankruptcy.
NEWS
By From Baltimore Sun news services | January 30, 2009
Mickey Rourke won't wrestle pro Chris Jericho A spokeswoman for actor Mickey Rourke says he won't be taking his role as a professional wrestler into a real-life ring after all. Paula Woods told the Associated Press that Rourke will not wrestle WWE superstar Chris Jericho at Wrestlemania 25 in April. Rourke, who plays pro wrestler Randy "The Ram" Robinson in the film The Wrestler, said Sunday at the Screen Actors Guild awards that he would toss Jericho "around the ring like tossed salad."
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2005
City tourism officials are using this month's scheduled opening of a museum spotlighting black history and culture to push Baltimore as a destination of choice for African-American tourists. With an eye on the planned opening June 25 of the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture, tourism officials increased their spending on advertising in predominantly black media by more than 66 percent over last year, to $224,900 from $134,800, said Nancy Hinds, spokeswoman for the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2005
Baltimore's long-awaited Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture, initially scheduled to debut last fall, is scheduled to open to the public June 25, museum executives said yesterday. The 82,000-square-foot, $34 million museum will open with a weekend of festivities, including a June 24 concert featuring Johnny Mathis, a ribbon-cutting and a host of family-oriented events. While many details remain undecided, some suggestions include wrapping the building in ribbon or holding a parade that would include representatives from Baltimore and Maryland's 23 counties.
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